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Full text of "School of Pharmacy Catalog 1975-1986"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/pharmacy86unse 



SCHOOL 

£<?S OF 

PHARMACY 




BULLETIN 1975/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
AT BALTIMORE 



Students of all races, colors, and creeds are equally admis- 
sible to the School of Pharmacy. It is the objective of the 
School to enroll students with diversified backgrounds in 
order to make the educational experience more meaningful 
for each individual as well as to provide pharmacists to all 
segments of the community. 



The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract between the 
student and the University of Maryland. Changes are effected from time to time in the general 
regulations and in the academic requirements. There are established procedures for making changes, 
procedures which protect the institution's integrity and the individual student's interest and welfare. 
When the actions of a student are judged by competent authority, using established procedure, to 
be detrimental to the interests of the University community, that person may be required to with- 
draw from the University. 






UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904) 



Catalog and 127th announcement 
1975-1976 



Volume 50 January, 1975 Number 1 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

636 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



Contents 

Academic Calendar 1974-75 3 

The School 

Aims and Objectives 5 

History 6 

Health Sciences Library 7 

Accreditation 7 

Degrees 7 

Correspondence 8 

Academic Programs 

Pre-Professional Program 9 

Pre-Professional Scholarships 10 

Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 11 

Application Procedures and Admissions Procedures 11 

Determination of In-State Status 12 

Fees and Expenses 13 

The Doctor of Pharmacy Program 14 

Financial Aid 15 

Graduate Program 18 

Tuition and Fees 19 

Professorships, Graduate Fellowships and Lectureships 19 

Assistantships 21 

Institutional Pharmacy Residency 21 

Academic Regulations 23 

Registration and Licensure Requirements of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy 26 

Student Life 

Housing 29 

Student Organizations 29 

Student Health 30 

Honors and Awards 31 

Professional Curriculum 

Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 36 

Doctor of Pharmacy Program 40 

Courses of Instruction 43 

Board of Regents 54 

Officers of the University of Maryland at Baltimore 54 

Officers and Faculty of the School of Pharmacy 55 

Academic Calendar 1975-76 60 



School of Pharmacy I 3 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
1974-75 



August 


26-27 




28 




29 


September 


2 


October 


25 


November 


28- 


December 


1 ( inc 


December 


20 



FALL SEMESTER 

Undergraduate and Graduate Student Registration 

Orientation 

Instruction Begins: Undergraduate and Graduate Program 

Labor Day — Holiday 

Didactic Sessions End (Fifth Year Students) 

Thanksgiving Recess 

Semester Ends: Undergraduate and Graduate Students 



WINTER SESSION 

December 12-13 Fourth and Fifth Year and Graduate Student Registration 

January 2 Instruction Begins 

3 Registration: New Students and Late Registration 

15 Martin Luther King's Birthday — Holiday 

28 Sessions End 



January 


29 




30 


February 


3-5 




6 




17 


March 


27 


March 


28- 


April 


3 (inc 


May 


23 




23 




29 




30 



SPRING SEMESTER 

Undergraduate Registration 
Undergraduate Instruction Begins 
Graduate Registration 
Graduate Instruction Begins 
Washington's Birthday, Holiday 
Didactic Sessions End ( Sec. A. — 5th yr. ) 

Spring Recess 

Didactic Sessions End (Sec. B — 5th yr. ) 

Semester Ends ( Third, Fourth and Fifth Year 

Commencement 

Memorial Day — Holiday 



4 I University of Maryland 




School of Pharmacy / 5 

THE SCHOOL 



AIMS AND OBJECTIVES 
OF THE SCHOOL 
OF PHARMACY 

As the only school of pharmacy in Maryland 
and as part of the State University, the 
University of Maryland School of Pharmacy 
accepts definite responsibilities for under- 
graduate, graduate and continuing educa- 
tion of pharmacists and those interested in 
the pharmaceutical sciences, and the con- 
duct of original research to advance scien- 
tific and professional knowledge. Graduates 
of the School serve as community, hospital 
and industrial pharmacists and their educa- 
tional background qualifies them for pro- 
fessional service in educational and govern- 
mental regulatory or environmental control 
agencies. Pharmacy graduates are uniquely 
qualified to pursue advanced study in the 
bio-medical and other health-care related 
sciences. Recent developments suggest that 
the pharmacist will become a patient-ori- 
ented drug expert. The School accepts this 
concept of an emerging new role of the 
pharmacist and the curriculum is designed 
to enable the graduate to take a more 
meaningful part in health care at the insti- 
tutional and community level. 

In meeting its teaching obligations, the 
School provides a curriculum and faculty 
capable of offering students an educational 
experience beyond training for the practice 
of pharmacy. In addition to acquiring the 
facts and techniques for pharmaceutical 
practice, graduates are able to employ the 



new advances in the medical sciences as 
they relate to the recent trends to meet 
the growing needs for health care. 

The new role of the pharmacist requires 
training not only in chemistry, physical 
chemical properties, stability and pharma- 
ceutical nature of drugs, but advanced 
training in clinical pharmacy and pharma- 
cology. The School of Pharmacy has mod- 
ernized its curriculum to permit its gradu- 
ates to play an important part with the 
physician in drug selection and monitoring 
of drug administration through a course of 
patient therapy, with early recognition of 
potential adverse drug effects. 

The aims- and objectives of the clinical 
program in pharmaceutical education in the 
School include the opportunity for inter- 
action with other students and professional 
people in the Schools of Medicine, Den- 
tistry, Nursing, Social Work and Commu- 
nity Planning, and Law. This interaction 
will enhance the opportunities for devel- 
opment of the informational role of the 
pharmacist to bring him closer to the 
physician as a recognized source of de- 
pendable information about drugs and 
therapeutic agents. Familiarity with the 
literature and methods of information re- 
trieval and distribution are considered in- 
dispensible to a modern practitioner of 
pharmacy. 

The School accepts its responsibility for 
recruiting and training programs for minor- 
ity groups or disadvantaged students to 
bring them to the educational level required 



6 I University of Maryland 



for the practice of pharmacy. Without low- 
ering admission standards or modifying the 
educational requirements, students of these 
groups within our society can participate 
in the educational processes in order that 
they can take their professional place in 
providing health care services. 

The University of Maryland School of 
Pharmacy has had a long tradition of pro- 
viding outstanding graduate programs and 
recognizes its obligation to continually 
strengthen and modify them on the basis of 
the needs of the scientific community and 
society. A strong graduate program is essen- 
tial to attracting outstanding faculty and 
to their continuing development as scien- 
tists and teachers. In addition, a strong 
graduate program fulfills a basic goal of the 
university in terms of elucidating new 
knowledge through various types of basic 
and applied research and supplying gradu- 
ate level scientists to government, industry 
and education. 

One of the major strengths of graduate 
programs in the various departments of 
the School of Pharmacy is the interrelativity 
of course work and research interests. Inter- 
disciplinary approaches to graduate edu- 
cation and research are and will continue 
to be stressed. Taking cognizance of the 
present concerns of graduate education, in 
terms of quality and quantity, the School 
of Pharmacy will continue to emphasize 
programs of limited size but high quality. 

Inherent in the activities of the School 
is the obligation to serve as the focal point 
of leadership for the profession of pharmacy 
in Maryland, and provide expertise to the 
community in related fields. The school is 
continuing to meet its public responsibilities 
as an information source, training profes- 
sionals, and operating a drug abuse educa- 
tion program, and a poison information 
center. In all these areas, it is not only 
fulfilling the needs of the citizens of the 
State but it is contributing to knowledge 
in the healing arts. 



HISTORY 

The first suggestion of a College of Phar- 
macy in Baltimore emanated from William 
F. Fisher, M.D., who established a phar- 
macy in the city about 1834. He was Pro- 
fessor of Botany in the School of Arts and 
Sciences, University of Maryland (Balti- 
more) and in 1837 was made Professor of 
Chemistry in the School of Medicine. Of 
Dr. Fisher's "Plan" we know nothing further 
than that he had formed one and that it 
met with favor among his medical col- 
leagues (a sudden illness prevented his 
participation in its execution ) . Also, in 1837, 
a convention of Eastern Shore physicians 
in Easton, Maryland made a demand on the 
General Assembly of Maryland for the 
establishment of a college of pharmacy. 

The Maryland College of Pharmacy, the 
oldest pharmacy school in the South, was 
organized in the City of Baltimore on July 
20, 1840, by a progressive group of Balti- 
more physicians (several were associated 
with the University of Maryland) and 
apothecaries to provide systematic instruc- 
tion in pharmacy and related sciences. The 
College, incorporated on January 27, 1841, 
gave its first lectures in November. 

During a brief association (1844-1847) 
of the old Maryland College of Pharmacy 
with the old, privately-owned and operated 
University of Maryland in Baltimore City 
(northeast corner of Lombard and Greene 
Streets ) , the first professorship of pharmacy 
in the United States was established. David 
Stewart, M.D., an alumnus of the School 
of Medicine ( 1844 ) was elected Professor 
of Pharmacy (1844-1846). 

From 1848-1903, the old College operated 
as an independent institution at various lo- 
cations in the city. In 1904, the Maryland 
College of Pharmacy became the Depart- 
ment of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland (Baltimore). In 1920, the Balti- 
more professional schools ( University of 
Maryland) merged with Maryland State 



School of Pharmacy / 7 



College (College Park) to form the State 
University. 

From the very beginning, the school has 
made many noteworthy contributions to the 
advancement of pharmacy. In addition to 
the first separate professorship in the theory 
and practice of pharmacy (1844), some 
other firsts include the establishment of a 
chair of analytical chemistry ( 1872 ) and 
an obligatory course in analytical chemistry 
for the pharmacy student. 

Alpheus Phineas Sharp, one of the first 
graduates from the newly-opened Maryland 
College of Pharmacy, read the first scien- 
tific paper before the American Pharma- 
ceutical Association in New York City 
(1855). Merck, Sharp & Dohme can trace 
its origin to the opening of his apothecary 
shop in Baltimore. 

In 1870, the college called the first con- 
vention of representatives of pharmacy 
schools to formulate uniform standards for 
the graduation of students. The convention 
was held in Baltimore and was the fore- 
runner of the American Association of Col- 
leges of Pharmacy. Many of the early phar- 
maceutical laws enacted by the legislature 
of the State of Maryland were initiated and 
fostered by the School. 

The school was one of the first in America 
to give a special course in prescription com- 
pounding, consisting of both lectures and 
laboratory work and the first to add a sepa- 
rate chair of commercial pharmacy and 
dispensing (1900). 

Graduate courses were first outlined in 
1928 and this inaugurated an era of high 
caliber graduate work which added much 
to the development and prestige of the 
school. 

This school was among the first schools 
of pharmacy to have a full-time pharma- 
cology department (1930) and the first 
laboratory in a pharmacy school for instruc- 
tion in biochemical assays. 

The first accreditation conference of phar- 
macy schools was held at the University of 
Maryland in 1932. This established the 



American Council for Pharmaceutical Edu- 
cation. 

The dual efforts of the School of Phar- 
macy and the Maryland Board of Pharmacy 
resulted in 1970 in a major change in the 
traditional pharmacy curriculum and intern- 
ship requirements. Maryland became the 
first state in the nation to eliminate the un- 
structured internship program and replace 
it with a professional experience program 
that was incorporated in the school's cur- 
riculum. 



HEALTH SCIENCES 
LIBRARY 

The Health Sciences Library, which serves 
the School of Pharmacy as well as the 
Schools of Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing and 
Social Work and Community Planning, con- 
tains more than 147,000 bound volumes 
and regularly receives 2,800 scientific peri- 
odicals and annual publications. 

Students have access to the time-honored 
collections of the Enoch Pratt, the Peabody 
Libraries, the Medical and Chirurgical 
Faculty and The Johns Hopkins University. 
The libraries are within convenient dis- 
tances of the School. Students also have 
access to the art collections at the Walters 
Art Gallery and the Baltimore Museum of 
Art. 



ACCREDITATION 

The School of Pharmacy is accredited by 
the American Council on Pharmaceutical 
Education. The School holds membership 
in the American Association of Colleges of 
Pharmacy. 



DEGREES 

The School of Pharmacy offers courses 
leading to the following degrees: Bachelor 
of Science in Pharmacy, Doctor of Phar- 



8 I University of Maryland 



macy, Master of Science, and Doctor of 
Philosophy. The general procedures to be 
followed by undergraduate students are 
set forth in the following paragraphs. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy will be conferred upon students 
who have successfully completed the pre- 
professional program and the three year 
professional program as outlined later in 
this bulletin. 

The Doctor of Pharmacy degree will be 
conferred upon students who have success- 
fully completed the pre-professional pro- 
gram, the first two years of the Bachelor of 
Science in Pharmacy program and the two 
years of the Pharm.D. program outlined 
on pages 40-41 of this bulletin. 

Candidates for advanced degrees must 
register in the Graduate School of the Uni- 
versity. For detailed information, see the 
catalog of the Graduate School. 



CORRESPONDENCE 

i 

All correspondence referring to entrance 
into the pre-professional program of the 
School should be directed to the accredited 
junior or senior college having pre-profes- 



sional programs. In the case of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland campuses, correspondence 
should be directed to the following: 

College Park 

Director of Admissions 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742 

University of Maryland 
Baltimore County Campus 

Office of Admission and Begistration 

University of Maryland, 
Baltimore County 

Dorm 2 

5401 Wilkens Avenue 

Baltimore, Maryland 21228 

University of Maryland 
Eastern Shore Campus 

Director of Admissions 

University of Maryland, 
Eastern Shore 

Boom 311, Maryland Hall 

Princess Anne, Maryland 21853 

All correspondence relative to entrance 
into the professional programs should be 
addressed to the School of Pharmacy, Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 636 W. Lombard 
Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 




School of Plxar inacij / 9 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL 
PROGRAM 

The pre-professional curriculum is designed 
to provide the student with those courses 
that satisfy his needs for a more liberal 
education as well as the scientific prerequi- 
site courses for entrance into the profes- 
sional program. These courses can be taken 
at the University of Maryland, College 
Park, Baltimore County or Eastern Shore 
campuses, or at any other accredited uni- 
versity, senior or junior college. To insure 
maximum transferability of credits, the 
University has articulated pre-professional 
programs with the community and senior 
colleges of the state. The specific course 
lists, unique to each school, are available 
from the School of Pharmacy, Dean's Office. 
In general, the course requirements are: 



Required Courses 

English 

Math (Precalculus or 


Analysis 


Credits 
6 


sequence ) 
Zoology or Biology 
General Chemistry 




6-7 
4 
8 


Organic Chemistry 
Physics 




8-10 

8 



Elective Courses 
Humanities 1 
Social Sciences 2 
Free electives 



6 

5-8 

17-20 



For admission, a minimum of 60 hours 
of credit exclusive of physical education, 
military science or similar courses is re- 
quired for the completion of the course 
requirements. 

RECOMMENDED HIGH 
SCHOOL PREPARATION 

The high school program should total at 
least 16 units, including 4 units of English, 
2 units of college preparatory mathematics, 
at least 1 unit of biology, chemistry or 
physics and history or social science. Addi- 
tional units of math and science are 
recommended. 

FINANCIAL AID 
(PRE-PROFESSIONAL) 

All requests for information concerning 
scholarships and loans in the pre-profes- 



40-43 



1 English, journalism, fine arts, classics, modern 
language, music, philosophy, speech. 

2 Anthropology, Afro-American Studies, econom- 
ics, geography, history, political science, psychol- 
ogy, sociology. 



JO / University of Maryland 



sional program at College Park, UMBC or 
UMES should be directed to the following 
offices : 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL SCHOLARSHIPS 
(College Park and UMBC) 

College Park 
Director, Student Aid 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742 

UMBC 

Director of Financial Aid 

UMBC 

5401 Wilkens Avenue 
Baltimore, Maryland 21228 

UMES 

Office of Student Financial Aid 

Business Office 

UMES 

Princess Anne, Maryland 21853 

Alumni Association of the School of Phar- 
macy Scholarships 1 The Alumni Associ- 
ation of the School of Pharmacy of the 
University of Maryland makes available 
annually scholarships to qualified pre-pro- 
fessional pharmacy students on the basis 
of worthiness, moral character, scholastic 
achievement and the need for financial 
assistance. These scholarships are open only 
to residents of the State of Maryland. Each 
scholarship not exceeding $500.00 per aca- 
demic year is applied in partial defrayment 
of fees and expenses at College Park. 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 
Scholarships 1 The Maryland Pharmaceuti- 
cal Association makes available annually 
scholarships to pre-professional pharmacy 
students on the basis of worthiness, moral 



1 These scholarships are awarded by the Com- 
mittee on Scholarships and Grants-in-Aid of the 
University of Maryland in cooperation with the 
Scholarship Committee of the Alumni Association 
of the School of Pharmacy and the Maryland Phar- 
maceutical Association. 



character, scholastic achievement and the 
need for financial assistance. Each scholar- 
ship not exceeding $500.00 per academic 
year is used in partial defrayment of fees 
and expenses at College Park. These schol- 
arships are open only to residents of the 
State of Maryland. 

Read's Drug Stores Foundation Scholar- 
ships 1 The Read's Drug Stores Foundation 
contributes annually several scholarships to 
pre-professional pharmacy students on the 
basis of worthiness, scholastic achievement, 
moral character and the need for financial 
assistance. Each scholarship not exceeding 
$500.00 per academic year is applied to de- 
fray partially the fees and expenses at Col- 
lege Park, Maryland. Recipients must have 
been residents of the State of Maryland for 
at least one year prior to the awarding of 
the scholarship. 

William J. Lowry-Alex Weiner Memorial 
Scholarship Fund 1 In memory of Dr. 
William J. Lowry, prominent alumnus of 
the Maryland College of Pharmacy, Class 
of 1896, and in 1926 a prime motivator in 
the reorganization and reactivation of the 
Alumni Association of the School of Phar- 
macy, University of Maryland and in 
memory of Alex Weiner, alumnus of the 
School of Pharmacy faculty, Mrs. William 
J. Lowry and friends and associates of Alex 
Weiner respectively, have provided funds 
to endow an annual scholarship grant. This 
joint scholarship is available to a qualified 
pre-professional pharmacy student enrolled 
at UMBC. The recipient of this grant award 
is selected on the basis of financial need, 
character and academic achievement. 

UMES Scholarship The School of Phar- 
macy makes available annually a $500.00 
scholarship to partially defray fees and 
expenses at the UMES for pre-professional 
students. The recipient of this grant award 
is selected on the basis of financial need, 
character and academic achievement. 



School of PJiarmacy I 11 




PROFESSIONAL 
PROGRAMS 

School of Pharmacy 
Baltimore Campus 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
IN PHARMACY 

Application Procedures 

Candidates seeking admission to the School 
of Pharmacy in Baltimore should write to 
the Dean's Office, University of Maryland, 
636 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, Mary- 
land, 21201. Applicants wishing advice on 
any problem relative to their application 
should communicate with the above office. 

Admission to the Professional Programs 
at Baltimore 

Students of all races, colors and creeds are 
equally admissible. It is the objective of the 
University of Maryland, Baltimore City 
Campus to enroll students with diversified 
backgrounds in order to make the educa- 
tional experience more meaningful for each 
student. 



Prerequisites for Application Consideration 
Applicants must present evidence of having 
successfully completed the required pre- 
professional program, or be enrolled in the 
final semester leading to completion of that 
program. In addition, applicants must have 
taken the Pharmacy College Admissions 
Test (PCAT) and had the test results sub- 
mitted along with the other records re- 
quired by the application. 

The minimum scholastic quality point 
average for application consideration is 
2.25. 

Application Deadlines 

All applications must be received by the 
Admissions Office by April 1st and all sup- 
portive records necessary for completion 
of the total application received by May 
1st. It is the responsibility of the applicant 
to insure that all these records are filed with 
the Admissions Office. 

Application Selection Procedures 

An admissions committee consisting of 
faculty members and representatives of the 
student body consider all applications meet- 
ing the required standards. The committee 
considers the applicant's academic achieve- 
ment, extracurricular activities, personal 
characteristics as determined by interviews 
by the committee members, and the scores 
on the Pharmacy College Admissions Test 
(PCAT). Academic achievement and/or 
high scores in the PCAT do not in them- 
selves ensure acceptance. Also of concern 
to the committee are the professional and 
social awareness, communication skills, in- 
tegrity, maturity and motivation of the 
applicant. It should be pointed out to appli- 
cants that while a minimal QPA of 2.25 is 
required for application consideration, the 
average QPA of entering students is ap- 
proximately 3.0. That fact, coupled with 
the multiple applications for each available 
position in the entering class give these 
applicants with QPA's below 2.5 extremely 
low probabilities for admission. 



12 I University of Maryland 



DETERMINATION OF IN- 
STATE STATUS FOR 
ADMISSION, TUITION AND 
CHARGE DIFFERENTIAL 
PURPOSES* 

An initial determination of in-state status 
for admission, tuition, and charge differen- 
tial purposes will be made by the University 
at the time a student's application for ad- 
mission is under consideration. The deter- 
mination made at that time, and any deter- 
mination made thereafter, shall prevail in 
each semester until the determination is 
successfully challenged prior to the last 
day available for registration for the forth- 
coming semester. A determination regard- 
ing in-state status may be changed for any 
subsequent semester if circumstances, as 
later defined, warrant redetermination. 

General Policy 

1. It is the policy of the University of Mary- 
land to grant in-state status for admission, 
tuition and charge differential purposes to 
United States citizens, and to immigrant 
aliens lawfully admitted for permanent resi- 
dence in accordance with the laws of the 
United States, in the following cases: 

a. Where a student is financially de- 
pendent upon a parent, parents, or 
spouse domiciled in Maryland for at 
least six consecutive months prior to 
the last day available for registration 
for the forthcoming semester. 

b. Where a student is financially inde- 
pendent for at least the preceding 
twelve months, and provided the stu- 
dent has maintained his domicile in 
Maryland for at least six consecutive 
months immediately prior to the last 
day available for registration for the 
forthcoming semester. 



* A complete statement of this policy is available 
from the Office of Admissions, Room 132, Howard 
Hall, 660 W. Redwood Street, Raltimore, Mary- 
land 21201. 



c. Where a student is a spouse or a de- 
pendent child of a full-time employee 
of the University. 

d. Where a student who is a member of 
the Armed Forces of the United States 
is stationed on active duty in Mary- 
land for at least six consecutive months 
immediately prior to the last day avail- 
able for registration for the forthcom- 
ing semester, unless such student has 
been assigned for educational purposes 
to attend the University of Maryland. 

e. Where a student is a full-time em- 
ployee of the University of Maryland. 

2. It is the policy of the University of 
Maryland to attribute out-of-state status for 
admission, tuition, and charge differential 
purposes in all other cases. 

3. Each campus of the University will 
be responsible for making the in-state de- 
termination for the prespective or enrolled 
student. 

4. In-state status is lost at any time a 
financially independent student established 
a domicile outside the State of Maryland. 
If the parent(s) or other persons through 
whom the student has attained in-state 
status establishes a domicile in another 
state, the student shall be assessed out-of- 
state tuition and charges six months after 
the out-of-state move occurs. 

Appeals 

A student or applicant who disagrees with 
his classification may request a personal 
interview with the Director of Admissions 
and Registration or his designee at which 
time the student will have an opportunity 
to present any and all evidence he may 
have bearing on his classification and to 
answer any questions which have been 
raised about his status. 

If the decision is adverse to him, a stu- 
dent may further file a written appeal to 
the Office of the President of the University. 
The decision of the President of the Uni- 
versity or his designee shall be final. 

The word "domicile" as used in this 



School of Pharmacy I 13 

regulation shall mean the permanent place one domicile may be maintained at a given 
of abode. For the purpose of this rule, only time. 



FEES AND EXPENSES 

Baltimore Campus 
1974-75 Academic Year 

Per Semester 

Tuition— In-State $ 275.00 

Out-of-State _ _ 855.00 

Tuition — Part-time undergraduate per credit (8 credits or less) 31.00 

Instructional Resources Fee (Full-time) 15.00 

Instructional Resources Fee (Part-time) 7.50 

Supporting Facilities Fee (Full-time) 30.00 

Supporting Facilities Fee (Part-time) 6.00 

Student Activities Fee (Full and Part-time) 10.00 

Student Health Fee (Full-time) 5.00 

Student Health Fee (Part-time) 2.00 

Health Insurance ( Blue Cross ) * 

One Person 42.30 

Two Persons 89.88 

Family 119.04 

Clinical Clerkship Fee (5th year only) 50.00 

Dormitory Fee 273.50 

° Student Health Care Program Health insurance is required of all full-time professional schools ( 9 
or more semester hours) in addition to the Student Health Fee. Students with equivalent insurance 
coverage must provide proof of such membership to his Dean at the time of registration and obtain a hos- 
pital insurance waiver. 

The University of Maryland at Baltimore, Health Care Program for its student body consists of the 
following: Blue Cross, Blue Shield, Diagnostic and Major Medical coverage. Additional information con- 
cerning the program may be obtained from the Student Health Office. 

Other Fees and Expenses 

Application Fee (non-returnable) $ 15.00 

Books and Supplies, approximately 100.00-175.00 

Breakage — Students are required to pay for all breakage in excess of 
$5.00 per year 

Change in Registration Fee (after first week) 5.00 

Deposit upon acceptance for admission (non-returnable) 50.00 

Graduation Fee (to be paid in February of the Fifth Year) 15.00 

Late Registration Fee 20.00 

Matriculation Fee (New Students) 15.00 

Special Examination Fee 5.00 



14 I University of Maryland 



The University reserves the right to make 
such changes in fees and other changes as 
may be found necessary, although every 
effort will be made to keep the cost to the 
student as low as possible. 

THE PROFESSIONAL 
EXPERIENCE PROGRAM 

The Professional Experience Program 
(PEP) of the University of Maryland 
School of Pharmacy is designed to prepare 
a student for the professional practice of 
pharmacy by means of a structured program 
of externship training, supervised by the 
School of Pharmacy and approved by the 
State Board of Pharmacy. The student- 
extern receives no pay for the time spent in 
practice but does receive academic credit 
and must fulfill specific education require- 



ments during the Professional Experience 
Program (PEP). 



THE DOCTOR OF 
PHARMACY PROGRAM 

The Board of Begents of the University of 
Maryland and the Maryland Council on 
Higher Education have approved the 
Doctor of Pharmacy Program proposed by 
the faculty of the School of Pharmacy. This 
six-year program is designed to complement 
and enhance, not replace, the baccalaureate 
program, and allows the student as recom- 
mended by the American Council on Phar- 
maceutical Education, and the American 
Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, to 
receive the Pharm.D. as a first professional 
degree. 




Scfiool of Pharmacy I 15 



A primary function of the graduate of 
this program will be to perform a clinical 
therapeutic service. This will include pro- 
viding to other health professionals infor- 
mation on the therapeutic use of drugs, 
adverse drug reactions, drug interactions, 
and toxicity of drugs; recommending drugs 
of choice; counselling of patients with re- 
spect to drugs; and performing a consul- 
tative function in the areas of clinical signs 
and measurements relating to therapeutic 
response. The graduate will be capable of 
other roles including that of an educator in 
pharmacy and other health professions 
programs. 

Pharmacy students who will have com- 
pleted the fourth-year of a five-year pro- 
gram in an accredited school of pharmacy 
and individuals who have been awarded 
the B.S. or advanced degrees in pharmacy 
may apply for admission to the Doctor of 
Pharmacy program. 

Prior to admission to the program, each 
applicant should complete, or plan to com- 
plete a pre-pharmacy and professional pro- 
gram equivalent to the first four years of 
Maryland's Pharm. D. program. 

In general, a 3.0 average (B ) in all courses 
in the professional program will be a mini- 
mum requirement. 

Personal interviews will be required of 
all qualified applicants and tests, letters of 
recommendation, etc. required if deemed 
necessary by the Pharm. D. Admissions 
Committee. 

Because the initial class size will be rela- 
tively small, only current students and re- 
cent graduates of Maryland's School of 
Pharmacy will be eligible for admission for 
the Fall term of 1975. 

FINANCIAL AID- 
SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 

Professional Program 
Baltimore Campus 

All requests for information concerning 
scholarships should be addressed to Dr. C. 



T. Ichniowski, School of Pharmacy, Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 636 West Lombard Street, 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

Alumni Association School of Pharmacy 
Scholarships The Alumni Association of 
the School of Pharmacy of the University 
of Maryland makes available annually 
scholarships worth $100 per semester to 
qualified students who have maintained a 
superior scholastic average and who are 
in need of financial assistance to complete 
their education. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical 
Education Scholarships The American 
Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education 
makes available scholarships worth not less 
than $100 per semester to qualified students 
of the Third, Fourth and Fifth Years. 

The Charles Caspari, Jr., Memorial Schol- 
arship In memory of Professor Charles 
Caspari, Jr., former dean of the School of 
Pharmacy, a number of his friends and 
alumni have made an endowment for a 
scholarship worth $100 annually. 

The H. J. (Jack) Custis, Jr., Memorial 
Scholarship Fund In memory of H. J. 
(Jack) Custis, Jr., Class of 1951, a fund has 
been established for the purpose of award- 
ing scholarships on the basis of reasonable 
need and academic ability to students in 
the professional program on the Baltimore 
Campus of the School of Pharmacy. Stu- 
dents eligible for the Custis Memorial 
Scholarship shall be residents of one of the 
nine Eastern Shore, Maryland Counties. 
The amount of each Custis Memorial schol- 
arship shall not exceed $300 in any one 
year. The recipient of each scholarship and 
the amount of each scholarship awarded 
shall be determined by the Dean of the 
School of Pharmacy and the School's Finan- 
cial Aid committee with the president of 
the Eastern Shore Pharmaceutical Society 



18 I University of Maryland 




GRADUATE PROGRAM 

The School of Pharmacy offers, through the 
Graduate School of the University of Mary- 
land, programs leading to the Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees 
in Medicinal Chemistry, Pharmacognosy, 
Pharmacology and Toxicology and Phar- 
macy. There is also a Graduate Residency 
Program in Hospital Pharmacy leading to a 
Master of Science degree and a Certificate 
of Residency in Hospital Pharmacy. 

The facilities for research and graduate 
instruction consist of specialized laborato- 
ries containing a wide range of modern 
equipment. Major equipment includes a 
gas chromatograph coupled to a mass 
spectrometer, nuclear magnetic resonance 
spectrometers, Magnaferm Fermentor and 
Rioflofermentor, plant tissue culture and 
biotransformation equipment, instrumented 
rotary and single punch tablet machines, 
complete aerosol equipment, equipment for 
radioactive counting and synthesis of radio- 
active compounds, in addition to other 



standard research equipment. The Health 
Sciences Library located on the Campus 
contains a wide selection of specialized 
books and research journals, and a Health 
Sciences Computer Center is also located 
on Campus. 

Most of the faculty at the School of 
Pharmacy are actively engaged in research 
and are well qualified to direct research in 
many areas including neuropharmacology, 
biochemical pharmacology, toxicology, syn- 
thesis and structure activity relationships 
of pharmacologically active compounds, 
pharmaceutical analysis, radiopharmaceuti- 
cals, isolation and structure elucidation of 
natural occurring compounds, Biophar- 
maceutics, physical pharmacy, industrial 
pharmacy, and institutional pharmacy. 

Candidates for advanced degrees must 
register in the Graduate School of the 
University. For detailed information, write: 
Chairman, Graduate Committee, School of 
Pharmacy, 636 West Lombard Street, Bal- 
timore, Maryland 21201. 



School of Pharmacy / 19 

TUITION AND FEES 
FOR GRADUATE PROGRAM 

Matriculation Fee (New Students) $ 15.00 

Tuition— Full-Time (In-State) 

Tuition— Full-Time ( Out-of-State ) 

Tuition — Part-Time, per credit (In-State) 47.00 

Tuition — Part-Time, per credit (Out-of-State) 72.00 

Instructional Resources Fee (Full-time) — 

Supporting Facilities Fee (Full-Time) 30.00 

Supporting Facilities Fee (Part-Time) 6.00 

Student Activities (Full and Part-Time) 

Student Health Fee (Full-Time) 5.00 

Student Health Fee (Part-Time) 2.00 

Health Insurance ( Blue Cross ) * 

One Person 42.30 

Two Persons 89.88 

Family 119.04 

Dormitory Fee 273.50 

Graduation Fee (January Candidates) 

Masters Degree 15.00 

Doctoral Degree 60.00 

Continuous Registration Fee 10.00 

Late Registration Fee 20.00 

Change Fee 5.00 



Student Health Care Program Health insurance is required of all full-time professional schools and 
Social Work students (9 or more semester hours) in addition to the Student Health Fee. Enrollment for 
all other graduate students is optional. Students with equivalent insurance coverage must provide proof 
of such membership to his Dean at the time of registration and obtain a hospital insurance waiver. 

The University of Maryland at Baltimore, Health Care Program for its student body consists of the 
following: Blue Cross, Blue Shield, Diagnostic and Major Medical coverage. Additional information con- 
cerning this program may be obtained from the Student Health Office. 

•° For billing purposes, full-time Masters degree students in the School of Social Work and Commu- 
nity Planning registering for 9 or more credits are billed a fixed tuition rate, all other graduate students 
are billed per credit hour. Full-time registration is for 9 or more credits. Maximum credit registration is 
15 credits. 



20 I University of Maryland 



PROFESSORSHIPS, GRADUATE 
FELLOWSHIPS AND 
LECTURESHIPS 

The Emerson Professorship of Pharma- 
cology Captain Isaac E. Emerson, of 
Baltimore, gave to the School of Pharmacy 
in 1927 a sum of money to establish a 
professorship of pharmacology. The first 
appointment was made in 1930 when Dr. 
Marvin R. Thompson was designated Emer- 
son Professor of Pharmacology. The chair 
was subsequently held by the late Dr. 
Clifford W. Chapman. Dr. Casimir T. 
Ichniowski, the present incumbent, was ap- 
pointed June 15, 1951. 

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical 
Education Fellowships The American 
Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education 
offers annual fellowships of up to $1800 for 
single persons or up to $2400 for married 
individuals who are promising graduate 
students desirous of doing research in phar- 
maceutical sciences; students may also ap- 
ply for an additional allowance up to $600 
for tuition, fees and supplies. These fellow- 
ships are open only to citizens of the United 
States. Address applications directly to the 
American Foundation for Pharmaceutical 
Education, Radburn Plaza Building, 14-25 
Plaza Road, Fair Lawn, New Jersey 07410, 
between February 15 and March 15 for 
consideration for the forthcoming semester. 

The H. A. B. Dunning Research Fellow- 
ship The late Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, a 
distinguished alumnus of the School of 
Pharmacy, former associate professor of 
chemistry and prominent manufacturing 
pharmacist of Baltimore, bequeathed a sum 
of money to endow a research fellowship in 
pharmaceutical chemistry. This fellowship, 
previously supported annually since 1930 
by contributions from Dr. Dunning, is open 
to promising graduate students interested 
in pharmaceutical chemistry. 



Centennial Research Fund Fellowships 
At the celebration of the hundredth anni- 
versary of the founding of the School of 
Pharmacy, a sum of money was collected 
to provide two fellowships for research 
studies in the following fields: Pharmacy, 
pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacology, 
microbiology, and pharmacognosy. 

The selection of candidates for these 
fellowships will be made by the faculty 
assembly with the approval of the Dean. 

The Andrew G. DuMez Memorial Lec- 
tureship The Andrew G. DuMez Memo- 
rial Lectureship was endowed by Mrs. 
Andrew G. DuMez as a memorial to her 
late husband, Dr. Andrew G. DuMez, dean 
of the University of Maryland School of 
Pharmacy from 1926-1948. The recipient of 
the lectureship is selected by a joint com- 
mittee of the members of the faculty and 
student body of the School of Pharmacy, 
and is a distinguished leader in pharmacy 
or the related health professions. The lec- 
tureship is held at the beginning of the 
academic school year. 

ASSISTANTSHIPS 

Graduate assistantships, covering tuition 
and laboratory fees and carrying a stipend 
of $3,000 or $4035 per year for a ten or 
twelve month appointment, are available 
to qualified students giving laboratory and 
teaching services to the department in 
which they serve. This service will consist 
of assisting in the undergraduate labs and 
teaching services. Such assistants can usu- 
ally carry two-thirds of the normal graduate 
work. The stipend for Teaching Assistants 
is $3300 for the second year (or beyond) 
and $3800 for those who have been ad- 
mitted to candidacy for the doctorate. 
Applications for assistantships should be 
made directly to the department in which 
the applicant will study. 



School of Pharmacy / 21 




INSTITUTIONAL 
PHARMACY RESIDENCY 

The University of Maryland School of 
Pharmacy offers a combined Graduate 
Residency Program in Institutional Phar- 
macy leading to the Master of Science de- 
gree and a Certificate of Residency in 
Institutional Pharmacy. Appointments to 
the residency are for a period of two 
academic years beginning each July 1. Dur- 
ing the academic year, the resident divides 
his time between the hospital and graduate 
study. Full time training in the hospital is 
required during the summers. 

Applicants must be graduates of accred- 
ited colleges or schools of pharmacy and 
have all prerequisites for admission to the 
Graduate School. 

The School of Pharmacy currently co- 
operates with three hospitals, i.e., the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Hospital, Maryland 



General Hospital and The Johns Hopkins 
Hospital. Each hospital offers a yearly 
stipend: 

U. of Md. Md. Gen. Hopkins 

1st year 9,535° 8,500° ° 10,500 

2nd year 10,663° 9,250°° 11,200 

For application, please contact the Direc- 
tor, Institutional Pharmacy Programs. In 
turn, the Graduate School and all Precep- 
tors participating in the program will be 
notified and applicants will be contacted 
directly. 

Applications should be submitted as early 
as possible in the academic year as only a 
limited number of applicants can be ac- 
cepted. 



* Tuition and laboratory fees are waived at this 
institution. Parking and uniforms are included. 

00 Tuition refunded. Meals, parking, uniforms, 
laundry, Blue Cross and Blue Shield are included. 




A 



School of Pharmacy / 23 

ACADEMIC 
REGULATIONS 



GRADING SYSTEM 

The School uses the standard University of 
Maryland grading system: 



Grade 



Interpretation Point Value 



A 


Excellent 


4 


B 


Good 


3 


C 


Fair 


2 


D 


Poor but Passing 


1 


F 


Failure 





I 


Incomplete 


Replaced by 
definite grade 
when course 
requirements 
have been 
met. 



Standing in scholarship is based upon the 
grade-point average for the semester's 
work. This average is found by multiplying 
the grade received by the number of credit 
hours the course carries, and then dividing 
by the number of credit hours. 

When, for any reason, a course is re- 
peated, the final mark is used. 

In computing scholastic averages only the 
grades earned in those courses taken in 
residence at the University of Maryland are 
considered. 



EXAMINATIONS 

Written and oral quizzes are given through- 
out the semester at the discretion of the 
instructor. Final examinations are held at 
the end of each semester as scheduled on 
the calendar printed in this catalog. 

Students unable to appear for final ex- 
aminations must report to the Dean im- 
mediately. When the absence is justifiable, 
the Dean will grant permission for a de- 
ferred examination. 



ACADEMIC WARNINGS 

Academic warnings are sent to students 
whose work in a particular course is suffi- 
ciently poor as to cause serious doubt of 
his ability to pass that course. The Dean's 
Office will mail the warnings to the student 
at any time during the first eight weeks of 
class. 

Each class has an academic advisor who 
is responsible for certain administrative 
duties concerning the class. In addition, 
each student is assigned to an academic 
counsellor who counsels him on his aca- 
demic standing. Copies of academic warn- 
ings are sent to the appropriate counsellor 
and students are strongly advised to seek 
advice from him. 



24 I University of Maryland 



INCOMPLETE WORK 

The mark of I (Incomplete) is exceptional. 
It is to be given only to a student whose 
work in a course has been qualitatively 
satisfactory, when, because of illness or 
other circumstances beyond his control, he 
has been unable to complete the require- 
ment. Whenever the mark I is used the 
instructor enters on the class card a reason 
of the character stated above with an 
estimate of the quality of the student's 
work. In cases when this mark is given the 
student must complete the work assigned 
by the instructor by the end of the next 
semester in which that subject is again 
offered or the mark I becomes F. 

All I marks must be completed before 
the student will be permitted to enter the 
Fifth Year of the program. 

REMOVAL OF 
D OR F GRADE 

If a course is retaken at the University of 
Maryland because of an original mark of 
D or F, the final mark will be substituted 
for the mark already recorded. Although 
the final mark received in the course will 
be used in determining credit for promo- 
tion and graduation, it does not apply to 
honors and awards. See applicable section 
under "Honors and Awards." 

If the student is authorized by the Dean 
to repeat the course, or its equivalent, at 
another university or college, the regula- 
tions applicable to transfer of credit apply. 
Credit is given if the course is completed 
with a grade of C (2.0) or higher; transfer 
credit is not used for computing grade 
averages. 

A student receiving an F grade in any 
course and if not successful in raising his 
grade after repeating the course once, will 
be required to withdraw from the School 
of Pharmacy. In unusual cases, a student 
may be permitted with the written permis- 
sion of the Dean and the head of the de- 



partment giving the course to repeat the 
course for the second time. Such permission 
can be given to the student for only one 
course. 



REGULATIONS FOR 
PROMOTION AND 
PROBATION 

All students are expected to maintain a 
cumulative grade average of not less than 
C (2.0). Any student who fails to maintain 
this average will be placed on probation 
during the next semester. Students must 
have a cumulative average of not less than 
C (2.000) for entry into the fifth year; the 
average must be maintained at 2.0 or above 
during the fifth year for a student to be- 
come eligible for graduation. 

Students who fail one or more courses 
will be subject to being placed on probation 
or academically dismissed, dependent upon 
an academic review of their record by the 
Faculty. 

Any student who has been on probation 
for one semester and then obtains a proba- 
tion average for a second semester will have 
the option of staying in school either on a 
full or a reduced academic load (see be- 
low). If the student elects to remain on full 
load and then obtains a probation grade 
point average for a third semester, he will 
be automatically dropped at the end of that 
semester. 

Any student whose academic record dur- 
ing one semester is so bad as to cause 
serious doubts as to his ability to complete 
the program may be dismissed at the dis- 
cretion of the Faculty, even if no F grades 
appear on his record. 



REDUCED LOAD POLICIES 

Students on a reduced load may take no 
more than two semesters to complete the 
equivalent of one semester on a full load. 



School of Pharmacy / 25 




An average of C (2.000) must be main- 
tained in the courses a student to taking on 
reduced load. Failure to maintain this 
average in any one semester will result in 
academic dismissal. 

Students are not allowed to enter or 
complete their fifth year on a reduced load, 
but may take fifth year elective courses 
during their fourth year. 



REGULATIONS FOR 
READMISSION OF 
STUDENTS DROPPED 
FOR POOR ACADEMIC 
STANDING 

Appeals against academic dismissal will be 
considered by the Committee for Student 
Promotions and Academic Status. A student 
who has been dropped for poor academic 






standing may appeal in writing to the 
Chairman of this committee. Should the 
appeal be dismissed, the student may take 
the appeal further by writing to the Dean 
of the School of Pharmacy. 

Any student who is reinstated will be 
placed on probation for that semester. Any 
student who has been dismissed for poor 
academic standing may be readmitted only 
once. 

Students wishing to be considered for 
reinstatement should submit a written re- 
quest to the Dean. 

REGULATIONS FOR 
REVIEW 

In the application of the foregoing rules 
and regulations the Faculty Assembly of 
the School of Pharmacy shall act as the 
final Board of Review. Any student may 



26 I University of Maryland 



apply in writing for a reconsideration of 
his particular case. 



TRANSCRIPTS OF 
RECORDS 

Students or alumni desiring transcript of 
scholastic records may obtain them from 
the Registrar upon written request, pro- 
vided the student's financial obligation to 
the University has been satisfied. 

WITHDRAWALS FROM 
THE SCHOOL OF 
PHARMACY AT 
BALTIMORE 

If a student desires or is compelled to with- 
draw from the University for any cause at 
any time during the academic year, he 
should secure an application for withdrawal 
from the Dean's Office, obtain the proper 
signature as indicated on the form and file 
it in the Registrar's Office. Withdrawal is 
not official as far as refunds and grades are 
concerned, until the form is filed in the 
Office of the Registrar. 

Minors may withdraw only with the 
written consent of parent or guardian. 

A student withdrawing from the Uni- 
versity during the first eight weeks of class 
should be given a grade of "WX" in his 
courses. A student withdrawing after this 
time shall receive a grade of "WF" in each 
course in which his work has not been 
passing. A student withdrawing after the 
last day of instruction shall be given a grade 
of "F" in any course in which he has not 
been doing passing work. 

CHANGE IN 
REGISTRATION 

(Drop and/or Add Courses) 

A student may drop a course without an 
"F" grade during the first three weeks of 



classes with the approval of the student's 
advisor and Dean. A student may drop a 
course without an "F" grade after the third 
week of classes only upon written approval 
of the Dean. Such authorization shall be 
granted by the Dean only under extraordi- 
nary circumstances; unsatisfactory scholar- 
ship in itself will not be considered an 
extraordinary circumstance. 

Changes in registration are not official 
until the form is filed in the Office of the 
Registrar. 

A fee of $5.00 is charged for changes 
made after the first week of classes. 

Students withdrawing from the Univer- 
sity will receive a refund of all charges, less 
the application and matriculation fee in 
accordance with the following schedule: 

Period from date instruction begins 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Third week 60% 

Fourth week 40% 

Fifth week 20% 

After five weeks 



REGISTRATION AND 
LICENSURE 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE 
MARYLAND BOARD OF 
PHARMACY 

Students enrolling in the School of Phar- 
macy shall, within 30 days, file with the 
Secretary of the Maryland Roard of Phar- 
macy an application for registration as a 
student of pharmacy. The fee for this is 
one dollar. The students are required to 
submit sworn statements of all internship 
experiences to the Roard upon their re- 
quest. The Roard recognizes the six months 
professional experience program of the 
School as satisfying their internship require- 
ments. 

Any person of good moral character who 
has attained the age of twenty-one years, 
who shall present satisfactory evidence to 



School of Pharmacy / 27 



the Maryland Board of Pharmacy that he 
or she has had at least four years standard 
high school training or its equivalent, and 
is a graduate of a reputable school of col- 
lege of pharmacy approved by said Board 
and accredited by the American Council 
on Pharmaceutical Education and the 
Board shall adopt the approved list as 
published on July 1 of each year, subject to 
amendment, and who after examination by 
the said Board be by it deemed competent, 
shall be registered as a pharmacist and be 



given a certificate of such registration, 
provided, however, that an internship pro- 
gram to be regulated by said Board be 
served. Such person shall make application 
to the secretary of said Board, at least ten 
days before any stated meeting of the 
Board and shall pay to the said Board fee 
of forty dollars. 

For further information, please contact 
the Secretary of the Maryland Board of 
Pharmacy, 610 North Howard Street, Balti- 
more, Maryland 21201. 



School of Pharmacy / 29 

STUDENT LIFE 



HOUSING 

Housing accommodations are available on 
the Baltimore Campus, 621 West Lombard 
Street. For particulars write: 

Ms. Elaine Kacmarik, Manager 
The Baltimore Union 
621 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



DISMISSAL 

The University reserves the right to request 
at any time the withdrawal of a student 
who cannot or does not maintain the re- 
quired standard of scholarship or profes- 
sional ability; whose continuance in the 
University would be detrimental to his or 
her health, or the health of others; or whose 
conduct is not satisfactory to the authorities 
of the University. When the actions of a 
student are judged by competent authority, 
using established procedure, to be detri- 
mental to the interests of the University 
community, that person may be required 
to withdraw from the University. 



PARKING 

The expansion program for the Baltimore 
campus placed a premium on space for 
parking on University lots. Student use of 
parking facilities on a temporary basis in 
certain designated University areas is con- 
tingent upon the availability of space. 



STUDENT 
ORGANIZATIONS 

( Baltimore Campus ) 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 
ALLIANCE 

The Student Government Alliance of the 
School of Pharmacy is an organization of 
undergraduate students established for the 
purpose of aiding in the internal adminis- 
tration of the School for organizing all 
extracurricular programs and activities or 
the student body and for coordinating these 
programs and activities with those of the 
faculty and administration to foster mutual 
understanding and cooperation. The Execu- 
tive Council is composed of the president 
of the Student Government Alliance, presi- 
dents of the respective classes and one 
delegate elected from each undergraduate 
class. 

AMERICAN PHARMACEUTICAL 
ASSOCIATION AND MARYLAND 
PHARMACEUTICAL 
ASSOCIATION 
STUDENT CHAPTER 

The purpose of the American Pharmaceu- 
tical Association and the Maryland Phar- 
maceutical Association Student Chapter is 
to encourage in the broadest and more 
liberal manner the advancement of phar- 
macy as a science and as a profession in 
accordance with the objectives stated in 
the Constitution of these two Associations, 
especially in fostering education in matters 
involving pharmacy in all of its branches 



30 I University of Maryland 



and its application and aiding in promoting 
the public health and welfare. 

STUDENT NATIONAL 
PHARMACEUTICAL 
ASSOCIATION, 
UMAB CHAPTER 

The purposes of this organization, being 
formed during 1974-75, are to help the 
minority student maintain the expected 
academic level; provide the minority stu- 
dent with an organization that can deal 
with problems facing pharmacy and phar- 
macists in this country; plan, organize, 
supplement, coordinate, and execute com- 
prehensive programs to improve the health, 
educational, and social environment of 
minority groups in Maryland. Although its 
membership is not limited to minority 
students, the SNPhA chapter hopes to pro- 
vide the health oriented minority student 
with greater opportunity to achieve greater 
self-awareness and a larger representation 
in the School of Pharmacy and to make the 
community more aware of the minority 
groups health problems. 

STUDENT HEALTH 

The Baltimore Campus of the University 
maintains a Student Health Service for a 



fee of $10.00 per annum, payable at regis- 
tration in September. A student's wife or 
child, or other members of his family, are 
not eligible for health care service unless 
the wife, too, is a student and has paid the 
fee for herself. At the beginning of the 
entering year, each student will be given 
a physical examination. 

The Student Health Service facility is 
located on the first floor of Howard Hall 
(660 West Redwood Street), and is open 
from 8:30 am until 4:30 pm, Monday 
through Friday. When the office is closed, 
students may report to the emergency room 
of the University of Maryland Hospital, if 
absolutely necessary. 

If this is a true emergency the Health 
Service will pay the emergency room fee. 
Otherwise, the student will be billed. 

All students are required to carry Blue 
Cross hospitalization insurance, or its equiv- 
alent. In addition, it is recommended that 
all students be covered by Blue Shield, or 
its equivalent, to cover physicians' and 
surgeons' fees. 

Additional information regarding the 
Student Health Service may be obtained 
in the Office of Administration of the 
School of Pharmacy. 




School of Pharmacy / 31 

HONORS AND 
AWARDS 



UNIVERSITY 
SCHOLARSHIP HONORS 

Final honors for excellence in scholarship 
are awarded to not more than one-fifth of 
the graduating class in each college, in- 
cluding the School of Pharmacy. The honors 
designations are listed in the commence- 
ment program and are recorded on the 
recipient's diploma. 

To be eligible for honors, pharmacy 
students must complete at least two aca- 
demic years of resident work at Baltimore 
applicable to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Pharmacy with an average of B 
(3.0) or higher. Those in the first tenth of 
the class will graduate with High Honors 
and those in the second tenth of the class, 
with Honors. 



THE DEAN'S HONOR LIST 

The Dean publishes at the end of each 
semester a list of those students who have 
maintained an average of "B" or better 
during the semester. Students whose names 
appear on the list both semesters receive 
the School's Academic Medal at the School 
of Pharmacy Convocations. 

In computing the grade point standing 
for the Dean's Honor Roll, if a student 
repeats more than one course in any year, 
both grades earned for these courses will 
be averaged in determining grade point 
standing. 



RHO CHI HONORARY 

PHARMACEUTICAL 

SOCIETY 

Omicron Chapter of Rho Chi, national 
honorary pharmaceutical society, was es- 
tablished at the University of Maryland in 
1930. Charters for chapters of this organiza- 
tions are granted only to groups in schools 
or colleges who are members in good stand- 
ing of the American Association of Colleges 
of Pharmacy. Eligibility for membership in 
the Society is based on high attainment in 
scholarship, character, personality and 
leadership. 



THE SCHOOL OF 
PHARMACY GOLD MEDAL 

A gold medal is awarded annually to the 
candidate for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Pharmacy who has attained the 
highest general average, provided that this 
average is not below the grade of "B." 
Certificates of Honor are awarded to the 
three students having the next highest 
general averages, provided these averages 
do not fall below the grade of "B." 

Honorable mention is made annually of 
the first three students of the fourth year 
class having the highest general averages, 
provided these averages do not fall below 
the grade of "B." 

Only courses taken at the School of 
Pharmacy at Baltimore are considered in 
awarding these honors. 



32 I University of Maryland 



THE WILLIAM SIMON 
MEMORIAL PRIZE 

In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, 
for 30 years a professor of Chemistry in the 
School of Pharmacy, a gold medal is 
awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly 
to a candidate for the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Pharmacy who has done 
superior work in the field of practical and 
analytical chemistry. The recipient must 
stand high in all subjects. In recommending 
a student for the prize, the professor of 
chemistry is guided in his judgment of the 
student's ability by observation and per- 
sonal contact as well as by grades. 

THE ANDREW G. 
DUMEZ MEDAL 

In memory of Dr. Andrew G. DuMez, late 
dean and professor of pharmacy at the 
School of Pharmacy, Mrs. Andrew G. Du- 
Mez has provided a gold medal to be 
awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly 
to a candidate for the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Pharmacy for superior pro- 
ficiency in pharmacy. 

THE L. S. WILLIAMS 
PRACTICAL PHARMACY 
PRIZE 

The late L. S. Williams left a trust fund, 
the income of which is awarded annually 
by the Faculty Assembly of the School of 
Pharmacy to the Student having the high- 
est general average throughout the course 
in practical and dispensing pharmacy. 

THE CONRAD L. WICH 
PHARMACOGNOSY PRIZE 

In appreciation of assistance which the 
Maryland College of Pharmacy extended to 
him as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich 
provided a fund, the income from which 
is awarded annually by the Faculty As- 
sembly to the fifth year student who has 
done exceptional work throughout the 
course in pharmacognosy. 



THE WAGNER 
PHARMACEUTICAL 
JURISPRUDENCE PRIZE 

In memory of her late husband, Mr. Manuel 
B. Wagner, and her late son, Mr. Howard 
J. Wagner, both alumni of the School of 
Pharmacy, Mrs. Sadie S. Wagner and her 
daughter, Mrs. Phyllis Wagner Brill, have 
provided a fund, the income of which is 
awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly 
to a fifth year student for meritorious 
achievement in pharmaceutical jurispru- 
dence. 

ALPHA ZETA OMEGA 
FRATERNITY PRIZE 

The Kappa Chapter and the Maryland 
Alumni Chapter of the Alpha Zeta Omega 
Fraternity provide a prize to be awarded 
annually to the fifth year student chosen 
by the Faculty Assembly for proficiency in 
pharmacology. 

EPSILON ALUMNAE 
CHAPTER. LAMBDA 
KAPPA SIGMA 
SORORITY PRIZE 

The Epsilon Alunnae Chapter of the 
Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority provides 
annually a prize which is awarded to the 
fifth year student selected by the Faculty 
Assembly for outstanding proficiency in 
pharmacy administration. 

JOHN F. WANNENWETSCH 
MEMORIAL PRIZE 

In memory of her late brother, Dr. John F. 
Wannenwetsch, a distinguished alumnus of 
the School of Pharmacy, Miss Mary H. 
Wannenwetsch has provided a fund, the 
income of which is to be used for a prize 
to be awarded to the graduating student 
majoring in general pharmacy who has 
exhibited exceptional performance and 
promise in the practice of community 
pharmacy. 



School of Pharmacij / 33 

EXTRA CURRICULAR MARYLAND SOCIETY OF 

AWARDS HOSPITAL PHARMACISTS 

Students who have given freely of their 

time for the betterment of the School in The Maryland Society of Hospital Phar- 

extracurricular activities receive extracur- macists provides an award to the fifth year 

ricular keys at the School of Pharmacy student who shows superior aptitude in the 

Convocations. area of hospital pharmacy. 



School of Pharmacy / 35 

PROFESSIONAL 
CURRICULUM 



ACADEMIC SESSIONS 

The School calendar operates on a three 
term basis. The Fall term is four months in 
length and is completed prior to the 
Christmas recess. The Winter term is one 
month (January) in length. Its purpose is 
to allow students to avail themselves of 
tutorial services or elective courses on the 
Professional or UMBC campuses of the 
University. The Spring term, four months 
in length, begins during the first week in 
February. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE 
PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 

B.S. PROGRAM 

The three year professional program as 
offered on the Baltimore campus has been 
divided into two parts; the first two years 
of the program being a basic science 
sequence, and the final year primarily 
clinical in design. By dividing the program 
in this manner it is hoped that students, 
upon completion of the two year basic 
science program, will make career option 
selections which will enable them to move 
into the final professional year to receive a 



B.S. in Pharmacy and fulfill requirements 
for licensure, or move into a proposed 
Doctor of Pharmacy program. 

The clinical year consists of six months 
of professional experience or clinical clerk- 
ship ( 14 credits ) plus 7 credits of required 
course work and 11 credits of professional 
electives. The required course work in- 
cludes courses in therapeutics, pharmacy 
practice, and clinical toxicology. The six 
months of professional experience is divided 
into three months of required time plus 
three months of elective time. The three 
month required clerkship is divided equally 
between community pharmacy, institutional 
pharmacy, and therapeutics and patient 
care. The final three months are elective in 
that area that the student desires to follow 
as a career. The community practice seg- 
ment will be served in a community phar- 
macy under a preceptor who has faculty 
rank as a clinical instructor in the School. 
This pharmacist is selected by the School 
and his practice must achieve certain re- 
quirements to be accepted. The student 
follows a structured program in the pre- 
ceptor's practice, and his performance is 
evaluated by both the preceptor and the 
school. The institutional practice centers 
around distributive functions in hospitals 



36 I University of Maryland 



ranging from the University of Maryland 
Hospital and the Johns Hopkins Hospital 
to community hospitals throughout the 
State. The segment of therapeutics and 
patient care is hospital experience time in 
patient care areas. Student will be involved 
in developing drug histories of patients, 
overseeing drug administration to the pa- 
tient, noting adverse drug reactions, going 
on rounds with medical staff, providing 
drug information to the physician, and 
other specialized conference activities. This 
program is under the supervision of the 
clinical pharmacy service which has been 
established in the University Hospital. 
Other patient care areas would involve the 
counseling of patients in the out-patient 
clinic, the dental clinic, and other patient 
care facilities in Baltimore. Completion of 
the professional experience program will be 
accepted by the Maryland Board of Phar- 
macy as meeting the internship require- 
ments necessary for licensure. 



PHARM.D. PROGRAM 

(Fall 1975) 

The Pharm. D. program is six years in 
length and, in general, parallels the first 
four years of the baccalaureate curriculum. 
Students admitted to the final two years of 
the program must have completed the pre- 
professional requirements and the first two 
professional years of the baccalaureate 
curriculum or its equivalent and applied 
calculus. The final years of the Pharm. D. 
curriculum are designed to allow the gradu- 
ate of this program to perform a clinical 
therapeutic service. This will include pro- 
viding to other health professionals drug 
information on the therapeutic use of drugs, 
adverse drug reactions, drug interactions, 
and toxicity of drugs; recommending drugs 
of choice; counseling of patients with re- 
spect to drugs, and performing a consulta- 
tive function in the areas of clinical signs 
and measurements relating to therapeutic 
response. 



PROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY 
FIBST PROFESSIONAL YEAR 

Title and Number of Course 

FALL SESSION 

MCHM 331 Quantitative Pharmaceutical Analysis 

MCHM 431 Biochemistry I 

PCOL 331 Anatomy and Physiology I 

PHAR 331 Introduction to Pharmacy & Health Care 

PHAR 333 Basic Pharmaceutics I 

WINTER SESSION 

No courses offered 

SPRING SESSION 



MCHM 


432 


PCOG 


332 


PCOL 


332 


PHAR 


334 


PADM 


332 



Biochemistry II 
Pharmaceutical Microbiology I 
Anatomy and Physiology II 
Basic Pharmaceutics II 
Drug Marketing 



Lee. 
3 
3 
3 

1 
3 



Hours/week 

Lab Credit 

3 4 

3 

3 4 

1 

3 4 



16 



3 
3 
4 
4 
3 

T7 



School of Pharmacy / 37 



SECOND PROFESSIONAL YEAR 

FALL SESSION 

PADM 342 Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence 3-3 

PCOG 343 Pharmaceutical Microbiology II 2-2 

PCOG 441 General Pharmacognosy I 3-3 

Principles of Drug Action I: 

MCHM 441 Chemistry of Medicinal Products I 3-3 

PCOL 441 Pharmacodynamics I 3 3 4 

PHAR 441 Riopharmaceutics 3-3 



18 

WINTER SESSION 

Optional Elective: 

PCOG 440 Community and Environmental Health 8-2 

SPRING SESSION 

PCOG 442 General Pharmacognosy II 2 3 3 

PADM 340 Social Sciences in Pharmacy 2-2 

PHAR 344 Intro, to Drug Prod, and Dispensing Var. Var. 1 

PHAR 346 Pathophysiology 3-3 

Principles of Drug Action II: 

MCHM 442 Chemistry of Medicinal Products II 2-2 

PCOL 442 Pharmacodynamics II 3-3 

Electives: (Select One) 

PHAR 342 Applied Calculus 4 - 4 

PADM 344 Pharmacy Management I 3-3 
(Dept) 448 Special Projects 3 

17 or 18 



38 I University of Maryland 



THIRD PROFESSIONAL YEAR 

SUMMER SESSION (June-August) 

Professional Experience (Clinical Clerkship) 

PHAR 360 Community Practice I 2 

PHAR 361 Institutional Practice I 2 



FALL SESSION 

Required Courses 

PHAR 461 Therapeutics 6-3 

PHAR 450 Pharmacy Practice 4 - 2 

PCOL 451 Clinical Toxicology 4 - 2 

Electives ( Select one ) 

PHAR 454 Institutional Pharmacy I 4 - 2 

PADM 351 Community Pharmacy Management II 4-2 

(Dept) 448 Special Projects (Var 2-3) 

9 or 10 

Professional Experience (Clinical Clerkship) 

N ovember- January (Select two courses in 3-month period) 

Therapeutics and Patient Care I - - 4 

Community Practice II - - 2 

Institutional Practice II - - 2 

Therapeutics and Patient Care I - - 2 

Special Studies - - 2 

4 or 6 
Total credits for Summer and Fall Session 17-19 

WINTER SESSION (January) 

Option Elective 

PCOG 440 Community and Environmental Health 8-2 

SPRING SESSION 

Elective (select minimum of 9 credits) 



PHAR 


362 


PHAR 


368 


PHAR 


369 


PHAR 


378 


PHAR 


363 



School of Pharmacy / 39 



SECTION 

PHAR 351 

PHAR 353 

PHAR 451 

PHAR 452 

PHAR 455 

PHAR 462 

PADM 352 

PADM 354 

PCOG 452 

PCOL 452 

MCHM 420 

MCHM 454 

PHAR 353 

MCHM 448 

PADM 448 

PCOG 448 

PCOL 448 

PHAR 448 



A (February-March) 
Parapharmaceuticals 
Non-Prescription Drugs 
Adv. Pharm. Formulation & Compounding 
Adv. Phar. Formulation & Compounding Lab 
Institutional Pharmacy II 
Pharmacy & the Health Care System 
Community Pharmacy Management III 
Drug Abuse Education 
Antibiotics 

Principles of Toxicology 

Instrumental Methods of Pharmaceutical Analysis 
Physical Chemistry II 

Non Prescription Drugs and Self-Medication 
Special Projects 
Special Projects 
Special Projects 
Special Projects 
Special Projects 



PHAR 


352 


PHAR 


353 


PHAR 


451 


PHAR 


452 


PHAR 


453 


PHAR 


456 


PADM 


352 


PADM 


452 


PCOG 


452 


PCOG 


454 


PCOL 


352 


PHAR 


460 



SECTION B (April-May) 

PHAR 351 Parapharmaceuticals 
History of Pharmacy 
Non-Prescription Drugs 
Adv. Pharm. Formulation & Comp. 
Adv. Pharm. Formulation & Comp. Lab 
Cosmetics and Dermatological Prep. 
Cosmetics and Dermatological Prep. Lab 
Community Pharmacy Management III 
Institutional Pharmacy Management 
Antibiotics 

Diagnostic & Clinical Microbiology 
Contemporary Non-Medical Drug Use and Abuse 
Pharmacy and Therapeutics colloquium 

Professional Experience (Clinical Clerkship) 

Section A (April-May) Section B (February-March) 

Select two courses 

PHAR 362 Therapeutics and Patient Care I 

PHAR 368 Community Practice II 
Institutional Practice II 
Therapeutics and Patient Care II 
Special Studies 

Total Credits for Spring Term 
Minimum total credits for fifth year 
Minimum total requirements for completion of R.S. 
Program (3 years ) — 100 credits 



PHAR 
PHAR 
PHAR 



369 
378 
363 



4 


- 


2 


4 


- 


2 


4 


- 


2 


- 


6 


1 


4 


- 


2 


4 


- 


2 


4 


- 


2 


Var. 


- 


1 to 


4 


- 


2 


4 


6 


3 


4 


6 


3 


6 


- 


3 


4 


- 


2 


- 


Var. 


1-3 


- 


Var. 


1-3 


- 


Var. 


1-3 


- 


Var. 


1-3 


— 


Var. 


1-3 


4 




2 


2 


- 


1 


4 


- 


2 


4 


- 


2 


- 


6 


1 


4 


- 


2 


- 


6 


1 


4 


- 


2 


6 


- 


3 


2 


- 


4 


4 


6 


3 


4 


- 


2 


2 


— 


1 



4 
2 
2 
2 
2 

or 6 

13-15 
32 



40 I University of Maryland 



DOCTOR OF PHARMACY PROGRAM 



FIRST AND SECOND PROFESSIONAL YEARS 

The first two professional years of the curriculum are the same for both the doctoral and 
baccalaureate programs, except for one course. Those students that expect to apply for the 
doctoral program must elect PHAR 342, Applied Calculus, in the Spring Session of the 
Second Professional Year. 



THIRD PROFESSIONAL YEAR 

Summer Session (June-August) 
PHAR 360 Community Practice 
PHAR 361 Institutional Practice I 



Credits 

2 
2 



Fall Session 


PHAR 


461 


PCOL 


457 


PHAR 


602 


PDIA 


520 


PCOL 


470 


PHAR 


362 


PHAR 


471 



Therapeutics (Sept.-Oct. ) 
Clinical Toxicology (Sept.-Oct. 
Advanced Biopharmaceutics 
Physical Diagnosis 
Drug Action Seminar 
Clinical Clerkship I ( Nov. ) 
Clinical Clerkship II (Dec.) 

Total credits 



3 
2 
3 
1 
1 
4 
3 



17 



Winter Term (January) 

PHAR 472 Clinical Clerkship II 



Spring Session 




PDIA 520 


Physical Diagnosis 


PCOL 471 


Drug Action Seminar II 


PADM 470 


Health Education Seminar 


PHAR 473 


Clinical Clerkship II 


Elective" 






Total Credits 




Total Third Professional Year Credits 



1 
1 

2 
12 

2 

T8~ 

42 



School of Pharmacy / 41 



FOURTH PROFESSIONAL YEAR 

Summer Session (June -August) 
PHAR 369 Institutional Practice II 
Total Credits 



Fall Session 

PCOL 475 

PHAR 

PHAR 

PCOL 

PHAR 



480 

483 

472 
474 



Clinical Pharmacokinetics Seminar 
Clinical Therapeutics Seminar I 
Clinical Teaching Seminar I 
Drug Action Seminar III 
Clinical Clerkship III 

Total credits 



1 

1 

1 

1 

12 



16 



Winter Session (January) 
PHAR 475 Clinical Clerkship III 
Total Credits 



Spring Session 

PHAR 481 Clinical Therapeutics Seminar II 

PHAR 484 Clinical Teaching Seminar II 

PCOL 473 Drug Action Seminar IV 

PHAR 485 Advanced Pharmaceutics 

PHAR 476 Clinical Clerkship III 

Electives" 

Total credits 

Total credits for Fourth Professional Year 

Minimum number of credits to complete 
Doctor of Pharmacy Program 



1 
1 
1 
2 
12 
3 



19 

42 

153 



" Electives may be selected from those courses offered as electives in the Final Professional year of the 
B.S. in Pharmacy program and will be selected by the students in consultation with their advisement and 
counselling committees. 



School of Pharinacy / 43 

COURSES OF 
INSTRUCTION 



MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY 
(MCHM) 

Professor: Zenker (Chairman) 

Associate Professors: Krikorian, Leslie, Wright 

Assistant Professors: Callery, Loberg, van der 

Hoeven 
Adjunct Staff: Fales 

MCHM 331. QUANTITATIVE PHAR- 
MACEUTICAL ANALYSIS (4) 
Fall Term, three lectures, one laboratory. A 
study of the principles of quantitative analysis 
with special emphasis on techniques applicable 
to the separation and analysis of compounds 
and products of pharmaceutical interest. 



FOR ADVANCED 
UNDERGRADUATES AND 
GRADUATES 

MCHM 420. INSTRUMENTAL 

METHODS OF PHARMACEUTICAL 
ANALYSIS (3) 
Two lectures, one laboratory, spring term. Pre- 
requisites: Organic Chemistry, Quantitative 
Analysis. A survey of electrometric, spectro- 
scopic, and chromatographic methods of chem- 
ical analysis as applied especially to the 
analysis of materials of pharmaceutical interest. 
Basic principles and applications of the various 
techniques will be stressed so that the student 



will gain an appreciation of the scope and 
utility of the methods discussed. 

MCHM 431. 432. BIOCHEMISTRY I AND 

II (3, 3) 
Fall term, three lectures; Spring term, two 
lectures, one laboratory. Prerequisite: 1 year 
of organic chemistry Physical and chemical 
properties of the components of living systems 
and of the metabolic processes in health and 
disease. 

MCHM 441, 442. CHEMISTRY OF 

MEDICINAL PRODUCTS I AND II 
(3, 2) 
Fall term, three lectures; spring term, two 
lectures. Prerequisite: 1 year organic chem- 
istry. A survey of chemical properties, structure 
activity relationships, and metabolism of or- 
ganic medicinal products. 

MCHM 448. SPECIAL PROJECTS 

(Var. 1-3) 
Independent investigations in the field of 
Medicinal Chemistry, consisting of library and 
laboratory or field research, seminars and x or 
other assignments appropriate to the problem 
being investigated. 

MCHM 454. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II 

(3) 
Spring term. Six lectures per week for two 
months. Prerequisite: Calculus. An introduc- 
tion to chemical kinetics molecular structure. 



44 I University of Maryland 



FOR GRADUATES 

MCHM 741. PHYSICAL ORGANIC 

BASIS OF MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY 

(3) 
Three lectures, fall term. Prerequisite: Physical 
Chemistry, intermediate Organic Chemistry. A 
discussion of atomic structure, bonding, res- 
onance, kinetics and mechanisms or organic 
reactions; sterochemistry and conformation 
analysis. 

MCHM 769. TOPICS IN STRUCTURE 

ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS (2) 
Two lectures, spring term, odd years. Pre- 
requisites: MCHM 441, 442, 741. Discussions 
of drug-receptor interactions, and of the known 
chemical factors which mediate drug action, 
including a discussion of the current quantita- 
tive concepts of structure activity relationships 
in Medicinal Chemistry. 

MCHM 773. BIOLOGICAL KINETICS 

(2) 
Fall term, even years. Prerequisite: MCHM 
454. Kinetics of complex systems applicable to 
drug distribution, medicinal and metabolic 
systems. Derivation of equations, mathematical 
models and application of experimental data 
to equations and models. 

MCHM 781. ENZYME AND METABOLIC 

INHIBITORS (2) 
Two lectures, fall term, odd years. Prerequisite: 
MCHM 431, 432. A discussion of the design, 
the mode of action at the enzymatic level, and 
the metabolism of biochemical analogs. 

MCHM 783. ENZYME AND METABOLIC 

INHIBITORS LABORATORY (1) 
One laboratory (can only be taken concur- 
rently with MCHM 781), fall term, odd years. 
Laboratory experiments or projects illustrating 
basic techniques in enzyme methodology, in- 
cluding enzyme inhibition in vitro and in vivo. 

MCHM 730. SEMINAR (1) 
Each semester. Required of students majoring 
in Medicinal Chemistry. Reports of progress 
and survey of recent developments in chem- 
istry. 



MCHM 799. THESIS RESEARCH 
Masters Level. Variable Credit. Staff. 

MCHM 899. DISSERTATION RESEARCH 
Doctoral Level. Variable Credit. Staff. 



PHARMACOGNOSY (PCOG) 

Professors: Blomster (Chairman) 
Assistant Professors: Rosier, Skarbek 
Adjunct Staff: Shay; Worthley 



PCOG 332. PHARMACEUTICAL 

MICROBIOLOGY I (3) 
Spring term, two lectures and one laboratory. 
Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry and MCHM 
431. This course is designed specifically for 
pharmacy students and include introductory 
studies on the practical and theoretical con- 
siderations of bacteria, molds, yeasts, viruses 
and rickettsiae, sterilization, immunity, epidem- 
iology and disease production. 

PCOG 343. Pharmaceutical Microbiology II 

(2) 
Fall term, two lectures. Prerequisite: Phar- 
macognosy 332. A study of the transmission, 
treatment, diagnosis, prevention, and etiological 
agent of diseases caused by pathogenic bac- 
teria, viruses, molds, yeasts and rickettsiae. 
Part of the course is devoted to the study of 
medical parasitology, pathology and parasitic 
infections. 

PCOG 411, 412. PLANT ANATOMY 

(4,4) 
Two lectures and two laboratories. Prerequi- 
sites: Permission of the instructor. Lectures and 
laboratory work covering advanced plant anat- 
omy with special emphasis placed on the struc- 
ture of roots, stems and leaves of vascular 
plants. 

PCOC 421, 422. TAXONOMY OF THE 

HIGHER PLANTS (2, 2) 
One lecture and one laboratory. Given in 
alternate years. Prerequisites : Permission of the 
instructor. A study of the kinds of seed plants 
and ferns, their classifications, and field work 
in local flora. Instruction will be given in the 
preparation of an herbarium. 



School of Pharmacy / 45 



PCOG 440. COMMUNITY AND EN- 
VIRONMENTAL HEALTH (2) 
Eight lectures/week/one month term; winter 
term. Prerequisites: Permission of the instruc- 
tor. A study of the public health facilities in 
the community; their relationship to the prac- 
tices of the allied health sciences and their 
impact on health care, and the disease state 
as well as the role of ecosystems in the health 
care package. The application of statistical and 
epidemiological methods to health problems 
will be illustrated through lectures and dem- 
onstrations. 

PCOG 441. PHARMACOGNOSY, 

GENERAL I (3) 
Fall term, three lectures. Prerequisites: Or- 
ganic Chemistry, MCHM 431, 432. A study of 
drugs from natural sources with emphasis on 
the therapeutic, chemical and physical proper- 
ties of purified phytoconstituents and discus- 
sion of their economic and sociological im- 
portance and practical application in pharmacy. 
Nomenclature, history, source, extraction, iden- 
tification and biosynthesis of carbohydrates, 
glycosides, tannins, volatile oils, lipids and 
enzymes are considered. 

PCOG 442. PHARMACOGNOSY, 

GENERAL II (3) 
Spring term, two lectures and one laboratory. 
A continuation of Pharmacognosy 441, to in- 
clude alkaloids, resins, hallucinogenic plants, 
harmful plants and certain aspects of allergy 
and allergenic plants. An intensive study of 
antibiotics and immunizing biological, discus- 
sion their utilization and relationship to ap- 
propriate infections and pathological diseases, 
is presented. 

PCOG 448. Special PROJECTS (Var. 1-3) 
Independent investigations in the field of Phar- 
macognosy, consisting of library and laboratory 
or field research, seminars, and/or other assign- 
ments appropriate to the problem being in- 
vestigated. 

PCOG 452. ANTIBIOTICS (2) 
Four lectures/week/two months; spring term. 
Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. The 
study of antibiotic substances, history, meth- 
ods of detection, production, biosynthesis, 
mechanism of action, extraction and assay to- 



gether with the chemical, pharmaceutical, and 
chemotherapeutic properties of these com- 
pounds. 

PCOG 454. DIAGNOSTIC AND CLIN- 
ICAL MICROBIOLOGY (3) 
Four lectures and two-two-hour laboratory 
periods/week/for two months; spring term. 
Prerequisites: Pharmacognosy 442 or special 
permission of the instructor. Theory and tech- 
niques involved in clinical and diagnostic ap- 
plied microbiology, particularly in routine 
serology, diagnostic microbiology, immunoelec- 
trophoresis, with quality control of parenteral 
solutions and other pharmaceutical prepara- 
tions with emphasis on sterility methods in 
the unidose concept. 

FOR GRADUATES 

PCOG 811, 812. ADV. STUDY OF VEG- 
ETABLE POWDERS (4, 4) 
Two lectures and two laboratories. Prerequi- 
sites: Permission of the Instructor. A study of 
powdered vegetable drugs and spices from the 
structural and micro-chemical standpoints, in- 
cluding practice in identification and detection 
of adulterants. Given in alternate years. 

PCOG 841, 842. ADV. PHARMACOG- 
NOSY (4, 4) 
Two lectures and two laboratories. Prerequi- 
sites: Permission of the instructor. An in-depth 
study of compounds obtained from natural 
sources and a discussion of modern methods 
and theories that are useful in the identifica- 
tion of the more important phytoconstitutents. 

PCOG 799. THESIS RESEARCH 
Masters level. Variable credit. Staff. 

PCOG 899. DISSERTATION RESEARCH 
Doctoral level. Variable credit. Staff. 



PHARMACOLOGY AND 
TOXICOLOGY (PCOL) 

Professors: Ichniowski, Khazan (Chairman). 

Kinnard 
Associate Professors: Buterbaugh 
Assistant Professors: Adir, Brown, Hattan, 

Louis-Ferdinand, Moreton 



46 I University of Maryland 



Adjunct Staff: Professor Carr; Associate 
Professor Freimuth, Associate Professor 
Kupferberg, Assistant Professor Barrett 

PCOL 331, 332. ANATOMY AND 
PHYSIOLOGY I AND II (4, 4) 
Three lectures and one laboratory. Fall and 
spring terms. A comprehensive study of struc- 
tural and functional relationships in the human 
body with special emphasis on aspects of 
disease processes and sites of drug action. 



FOR ADVANCED 
UNDERGRADUATES AND 
GRADUATES 

PCOL 441, 442. PHARMACODYNAMICS 

I AND II (4, 3) 
Three lectures and one laboratory, fall term; 
three lectures second semester. A comprehen- 
sive study of pharmacodynamics leading to the 
rational therapeutic application of drugs. 

PCOL 448. SPECIAL PROJECTS 

(Var. 1-3) 
Independent investigations in the field of 
Pharmacology, consisting of library and lab- 
oratory or field research, seminars, and/or other 
assignments appropriate to the problem being 
investigated. 

PCOL 451. CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY 

(2) 
Fall term, four lectures /week for two months. 
Deals with the clinical classes of poisoning 
and includes pharmacological principles in 
treatment of acute poisoning, mechanism of 
toxic actions of drugs and household products 
and responsibilities of poison control officers. 

PCOL 452. PRINCIPLES OF TOXI- 
COLOGY (3) 
Spring term, four lectures/week for two 
months, with conferences and laboratory proj- 
ects equivalent to one laboratory. Deals with 
basic principles of investigative toxicology and 
includes toxic effects on organ, cell and 
enzyme systems, forensic toxicology and tox- 
icity of classes of compounds. 



FOR DOCTOR OF 
PHARMACY STUDENTS 

PCOL 470, 471, 472, 473. DRUG AC- 
TION SEMINAR I-IV (1, 1, 1, 1) 
One session per week. The course will be pre- 
sented in each semester and will have a topic 
schedule which repeats itself every two years. 
The course is an interdisciplinary seminar de- 
signed to present a wide variety of funda- 
mental and applied aspects of the effect of 
drugs on the biological systems at a level of 
sophistication commensurate with that of the 
Pharm.D. student. The primary objective is to 
improve the student's ability, when observing 
an altered therapeutic response or when at- 
tempting to predict an alteration in advance, to 
utilize his basic science knowledge in thinking 
about the following determinants of drug ac- 
tivity: dosage form and route of administration, 
dose and dose regimen, absorption, distribu- 
tion, metabolism, excretion, receptor-drug in- 
teractions, drug-drug interactions, interactions 
with other substances, effects of disease, and 
miscellaneous patient and drug variables. 

PCOL 475. CLINICAL PHARMACO- 
KINETICS SEMINAR (1) 
One session per week. This seminar course is 
to provide students with a knowledge of the 
application of pharmacokinetic principles to 
clinical situations. Students will learn to 
kinetically analyze specific patients with an 
emphasis on how pathophysiologic processes 
and drugs influence the kinetics of therapeutic 
agents. 

FOR GRADUATES 

PCOL 601, 602. ADV. TOXICOLOGY 

(3,4) 
Prerequisites: Biochemistry (MCHM 431, 
432), Physiology (PCOL 331, 332) or equiva- 
lent and consent of the instructor. Lectures 
with conferences and laboratory experiments 
dealing with the mechanism of toxicity. A two 
semester course, either semester may be taken 
separately. PCOL 601 (Fall) Clinical and En- 
vironmental Toxicology deals with the clinical 
classes of poisoning and includes the phar- 
macological principles in the treatment of 
acute poisoning, mechanism of toxic action, 
toxic interactions, safety testing, chemical 



School of Pharmacy / 47 



carcinogenesis, teratogenesis, mutagenesis and 
pesticides. The conferences and laboratories 
concern the biochemical methods utilized in 
investigation of drug interactions. PCOL 602 
(Spring) Principles of Investigative Toxicology 
deals with basic principles of investigative 
toxicology which includes toxic effects on 
organ, cell and enzyme systems; forensic 
toxicology and the toxicity of classes of com- 
pounds. The laboratories cover the biochemical 
methods utilized in investigative toxicology. 

PCOL 643, 644. PHARMACODYNAMICS 

I AND II (5, 4) 
Comprises the lectures of PCOL 441 and 442 
together with weekly conferences and a term 
paper. Prerequisites: Anatomy and Physiology 
(PCOL 331, 332) and Biochemistry (MCHM 
431 and 432) or equivalent and consent of 
the course director. 

PCOL 707. PRINCIPLES OF BIO- 
CHEMICAL PHARMACOLOGY (3) 
Offered in alternate years. Two lectures, one 
laboratory weekly. Prerequisites: PCOL 441, 




442, MCHM 431, 432 or equivalent and con- 
sent of the instructor. A theoretical and prac- 
tical approach to the study of the cellular and 
sub-cellular actions of drugs and the relation- 
ship of these actions to the pharmacological 
properties of medicinal agents in the intact 
organism. 

PCOL 747. PHYSIOLOGICAL DISPOSI- 
TION OF DRUGS (3) 
Offered in alternate years. Two hours of lec- 
ture weekly and laboratory projects equivalent 
to one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: 
Physiology (PCOL 331, 332 or equivalent), 
Calculus and consent of the instructor. A de- 
tailed study of the principles of drug transport, 
distribution, biotransformation, binding and ex- 
cretion with emphasis on quantitative aspects 
and measurement of these processes. 

PCOL 829 A-D. ADV. PHARMACO- 
DYNAMICS (3) 
A coordinated series of four (4) one semester 
courses involving two (2) hours of lecture 
weekly together with conferences and special 
laboratory exercises. Offered in alternate years. 
Prerequisite: PCOL 441, 442 or equivalent. 
A-Neuropharmacology. B-Autonomic Pharma- 
cology. C-Cardiovascular Pharmacology. D- 
Renal and Endocrine Pharmacology. 

PCOL 858, 859. SPECIAL STUDIES IN 

PHARMACODYNAMICS (2-4) 
Each semester. Prerequisite: PCOL 441, 442 
or equivalent. Laboratories and conferences. 
Credit according to the amount of work under- 
taken after consultation with the instructor. 

PCOL 889. SEMINAR (1) 
Each semester. Prerequisites: Consent of the 
department staff member designated as re- 
sponsible for seminar. Reports on current 
literature or research in progress. 

PCOL 799. THESIS RESEARCH 
Masters Level. Variable Credit. Staff. 

PCOL 899. DISSERTATION RESEARCH 
Doctoral Level. Variable credit. Staff. 



48 I University of Maryland 



PHARMACY (PHAR) 

Professors: Shangraw (Chairman), Lamy 
Associate Professors: Allen, Augsburger 
Assistant Professors: Hodes, Oderda, Wiser, 

Roffman, Richman, Tobias 
Instructors: Fuller, Hoopes, Hoppe, 

Edmondson, Michocki, Fedder 
Adjunct Staff: Yolles, Heller, Sewell 
Clinical Staff: Kowalewski, Spieer, Woodward, 
Fox, Rapoport, Birmingham, Booth, 
Burkhart, Derewicz, Fortner, Goldner, Kerr, 
Patrick, Riley, Snyder, Standiford, Biasini, 
Brodeur, Connelly, Abarbanel, Bialek, 
Block, Campbell, Catlett, Cohen, Conrad, 
Cragg, Culp, Dechter, DeMichaelis, 
Dorsch, Elliott, Freiman, Glassband, 
Greenhouse, Henderson, Klein, Lee, 
Lubman, Lykos, Hospodavis, Mintz, 
Morgenroth, Newcomb, Oed, Padussis, 
Parker, Pilquist, Poklis, Powell, Price, 
Rogalski, Roth, Rubin, Sand, Schiff, 
Sherman, Sacki, Swartz, Tinelli, Yousem, 
Weinstein, White, Jaffe, Jaskulski, Johnson, 
Kight, Koller, Lichter, Rosenstein, Rumrill, 
Shaw, Smith, Title, Seidman, Goldner 



PHAR 331. INTRODUCTION TO PHAR- 
MACY AND HEALTH CARE (1) 
Third year, Fall term, one lecture. An orienta- 
tion program designed to acquaint students 
with the role of pharmacy together with the 
other members of the health professions in 
the delivery of health care services — past, 
present and future. 

PHAR 333, 334. BASIC PHARMACEU- 
TICS I and II (4, 4) 
Third year, three lectures and one laboratory. 
A study of the basic technology involved in 
small and large scale production of pharma- 
ceutical dosage forms (first semester: solid 
and semi-solid dosage forms; second semester: 
solutions and liquid disperse systems). It is 
also designed to increase the understanding of 
physical-chemical principles involved in phar- 
maceutical systems and the application of such 
knowledge to the problems involved in drug 
formulation, preparation, distribution, stability 
and pharmacological action. 



PHAR 344. INTRODUCTION TO DRUG 
PRODUCTS AND DISPENSING (1) 
Spring term, lecture and laboratory (var.). A 
presentation of the important dosage forms of 
commercial drug products in each pharma- 
cological classification including the procedures 
involved in the storage, dispensing, record- 
keeping and the provision of relevant drug 
information. 

PHAR 346. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY (3) 
This course will enable students, by generally 
considering broad concepts of diseased physio- 
logic processes, to relate them to specific 
disease states and to the rationale for thera- 
peutic correction. Emphasis at all times will 
be on disease processes rather than on the 
specifics of a given disease state. 

PHAR 351. PARAPHARMACEUTICALS 

(2) 
Spring term, four lectures week for two 
months. A discussion of prescription acces- 
sories and related items to enable the phar- 
macist to act as consultant to members of the 
health care team and his patients. Emphasis 
will be placed on design, composition, proper 
use and contraindications. 

PHAR 352. HISTORY OF PHARMACY (1) 

Spring term, two lectures/week for two 
months. A survey of the history of pharmacy 
with emphasis on those aspects more pertinent 
to the practice of pharmacy in the United 
States and Maryland. 

PHAR 353. NON-PRESCRIPTION DRUGS 

(2) 
A comprehensive course dealing with self- 
medication and over-the-counter drugs. Among 
the topics discussed are the socio-historical 
aspects of self-medication, the regulation of 
non-prescription drugs, the manufacture and 
distribution of OTC drugs, the advertising of 
OTC drugs, and the therapeutic categories 
and pharmacology of OTC drugs. 

PHAR 360. COMMUNITY PRACTICE I 

(2) 
Summer. A required four week professional 
experience program designed to acquaint the 
pharmacy student with basic concepts of 
community practice. 



School of Pharmacij / 49 



PHAR 361. INSTITUTIONAL PRACTICE 

I (2) 

Summer. A required four week professional 
experience program designed to acquaint the 
pharmacy student with basic concepts of in- 
stitutional practice. 

PHAR 362. THERAPEUTICS AND 

PATIENT CARE I (4) 
A required four week professional experience 
program designed to acquaint the pharmacy 
student with disease states and related thera- 
peutics by involvement in hospital patient care. 

PHAR 363. SPECIAL STUDIES (2) 
By permission of Pharmacy Department. An 
elective four week professional experience in 
a specialized health care service or related area. 

PHAR 368. COMMUNITY PRACTICE II 

(2-6) 
2 credits 4 weeks. Advanced professional ex- 
perience in community practice. 

PHAR 369. INSTITUTIONAL PRACTICE 

II (2-6) 

2 credits/4 weeks. Advanced professional ex- 
perience in institutional practice. 

PHAR 378. THERAPEUTICS AND 

PATIENT CARE II (2-6) 
2 credits/4 weeks. Advanced professional ex- 
perience in therapeutics. 



FOR ADVANCED 
UNDERGRADUATES AND 
GRADUATES 

PHAR 441. BIOPHARMACEUTICS (3) 
Fall term. A study of the physical, chemical 
and biological factors which influence drug 
action with an emphasis on the choice of 
dosage forms and formulation to optimize 
therapeutic effect. 

PHAR 450. PHARMACY PRACTICE (2) 
Fall term, four lectures or discussions/week 
for two months. A presentation of the essential 
components of specialized areas of study as 
they apply to pharmacy practice, including an 
analysis of the health professions and the 
health care system, methods of drug distribu- 



tion and control, radiopharmaceuticals, sterile 
dosage forms, parapharmaceuticals, non-pre- 
scription drugs, cosmetics, drug stability pack- 
aging and administration. 

PHAR 448. SPECIAL PROJECTS 

(Var. 1-3) 
Independent investigations in the field of 
Pharmacy, consisting of library and laboratory 
or field research, seminars and /or other assign- 
ments appropriate to the problem being in- 
vestigated. 

PHAR 451. ADV. PHARMACEUTICAL 
FORMULATIONS AND COMPOUND- 
ING (2) 
Spring term, four lectures week for two 
months. A study of the ingredients and tech- 
niques involved in the extemporaneous or 
small scale bulk compounding of pharmaceu- 
tical formulations utilized in community and 
hospital pharmacy. 

PHAR 452. ADV. PHARMACEUTICAL 
FORMULATIONS AND COMPOUND- 
ING LABORATORY (1) 

Spring term, laboratory. 

PHAR 453. COSMETICS AND DERMA- 

TOLOGICAL PREPARATIONS (2) 
A presentation of the essential components of 
specialized areas of cosmetics and cosmetic- 
like preparations used in pharmacy. The course 
is designed to familiarize students with in- 
gredients and processes involved in the formu- 
lation, manufacture, and quality control of 
cosmetics. Lectures and topics on the funda- 
mentals of cosmetic law and government regu- 
lations of importance to pharmacists. Field 
trips to the Noxell Corporation to acquaint the 
pharmacy student with the manufacturing 
operation on a commercial scale. 

PHAR 454. INSTITUTIONAL PHAR- 
MACY I (2) 
Fall term, four lectures /week for two months. 
Fundamentals of institutional pharmacy prac- 
tice and administration with emphasis on hos- 
pital and nursing homes. Includes physical 
facilities, standards, purchasing, formulary, 
recordkeeping, drug distribution and control 
systems. 



50 I University of Maryland 



PHAR 455. INSTITUTIONAL PHAR- 
MACY II (2) 
Spring term, four lectures/ week for two 
months. A study of the administrative organi- 
zation of health care institutions and interrela- 
tionship of various units with the pharmacy. 
Includes, in depth, individual study of one 
particular aspect of institutional pharmacy 
practice. 

PHAR 456. COSMETICS AND DERMA- 
TOLOGICAL PREPARATIONS LAB- 
ORATORY (1) 

Spring term, laboratory. 

PHAR 460. PHARMACY AND THERA- 
PEUTICS COLLOQUIUM (1) 
Spring term, two hour/ week for two months. 
Discussions of case studies from professional 
experience program and current developments 
in pharmacy. 

PHAR 461. THERAPEUTICS (3) 
Fall term, 6 hours/week for two months. A 
course designed to present basic principles of 
rational drug therapy within the context of 
various pathophysiologic processes which the 
student has already learned. Concurrently, 
salient points in the evaluation of therapeutic 
literature will be discussed. 

PHAR 462. PHARMACY AND THE 

HEALTH CARE SYSTEM (2) 
Spring term, four lectures/week for two 
months. (Undergraduates with permission of 
the instructor) A course designed to familiarize 
pharmacists with the total health care environ- 
ment; to introduce applicable, analytical and 
technical skills, such as systems analysis and 
computer science; to identify the various social, 
political, economic and professional pressures 
which are influencing developments in health 
care and to increase the pharmacist's apprecia- 
tion of the changes affecting the health care 
system. 

FOR DOCTOR OF 
PHARMACY STUDENTS 

PHAR 471, 472, 473. CLINICAL CLERK- 
SHIP II (3 Credits/ Month) 
Students will work closely with the Clinical 
Pharmacy staff in the areas where clinical 



services exist and would be given some direct 
responsibility in patient-care services and in 
directing undergraduate students in their basic 
clerkships. Emphasis in these experiences 
would be placed on solving specific therapeutic 
problems, gaining clinical experience in the 
practical problems encountered in therapeutics, 
and gaining experience in providing drag in- 
formation. 

PHAR 474, 475, 476. CLINICAL CLERK- 
SHIP III (3 Credits/ Month) 
Clerkships for advanced (4th year) students 
designed to improve the depth of their clinical 
skills and to allow for initial selection of 
areas of specialty. 

PHAR 480, 481. CLINICAL THERA- 
PEUTICS SEMINAR I, II (1,1) 
One session per week. A seminar designed to 
provide the student with experience in analyz- 
ing specific patient therapeutic problems 
through formal patient presentation and anal- 
ysis seminars conducted by members of the 
Clinical Pharmacy Division and Medical Per- 
sonnel. 




School of Pharmacy / 51 



PHAR 483, 484. CLINICAL TEACHING 

SEMINAR I, II (1, 1) 
One session per week. A seminar course de- 
signed to analyze the various clinical teaching 
techniques and their application. Discussion 
will center on the application of the problem 
oriented medical record to clinical teaching, 
the problem oriented educational audit, prob- 
lems encountered in clinical teaching, methods 
of orienting students to the clinical environ- 
ment and a discussion of group dynamics in 
relation to communication skills and interper- 
sonal relationships. 

PHAR 485. ADV. PHARMACEUTICS (2) 
Two lectures per week. A study of specialized 
formulations and dosage forms. Topics in- 
clude: drug stability, drug packaging and de- 
vices, sterile dosage forms, radiopharmaceu- 
ticals, etc. 



FOR GRADUATES 

PHAR 602. ADVANCED BIOPHARMA- 

CEUTICS (3) 
Three lectures, given in alternate years. Pre- 
requisite: PHAR 441, PCOL 441, 442 and 
calculus. With the consent of the instructor 
some or all of these prerequisites may be 
waived. A clinically oriented in-depth study 
of the factors affecting the time-course of 
drugs with emphasis on the implication and 
qualification of these factors in the disease 
state. 



of these prerequisites may be waived. A study 
of drug stability as affected by environment 
and containers with emphasis on the physical 
and chemical properties of both the drugs and 
the component parts of the container as well 
as the practical problems of drug packaging, 
storage and clinical effectiveness. 

PHAR 701. THEORETICAL ASPECTS OF 

LIQUID DOSAGE FORMS (3) 
Three lectures, fall term, given in alternate 
years. Prerequisites: PHAR 333, 334 and an 
acceptable course in physical chemistry. With 
the consent of the instructor some or all of 
these prerequisites may be waived. The ap- 
plication of fundamental physicochemical 
concepts of solution theory, colloids, rehology, 
and surface chemistry in order to gain an 
understanding of liquid dosage forms. 

PHAR 702. THEORETICAL ASPECTS OF 

SOLID DOSAGE FORMS (3) 
Three lectures, spring term, given in alternate 
years. Prerequisites: PHAR 333, 334 and an 
acceptable course in physical chemistry. With 
the consent of the instructor some or all of 
these prerequisites may be waived. A survey 
of the fundamentals relevant to the perform- 
ance and processing of solid dosage forms. As 
most pharmaceuticals are prepared from pow- 
ders, special emphasis is given to means of 
identifying, measuring and controlling those 
properties that determine the processing char- 
acteristics of powdered materials. 



PHAR 610. PHARMACEUTICAL FORMU- 
LATION AND UNIT PROCESSES (3) 
Three lectures, fall term, given in alternate 
years. Prerequisites: PHAR 333 and 334. With 
the consent of the instructor some or all of 
these prerequisites may be waived. A study 
of the processes and equipment involved in 
the large-scale manufacture of pharmaceuticals, 
including a discussion of control procedures, 
new drug applications, patents, and the Federal 
Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 

PHAR 612. DRUG STABILITY AND 
PACKAGING TECHNOLOGY (3) 
Three lectures, spring term, given in alternate 
years. Prerequisites: PHAR 333, 334 and 441. 
With the consent of the instructor some or all 



PHAR 703. INDUSTRIAL PHARMACY 

LABORATORY (2) 
Two laboratories, given in alternate years. Pre- 
requisites: Consent of the instructor. Labora- 
tory practice in the preparation of useful and 
important pharmaceuticals in large quantity, 
including the observance of Federal "Good 
Manufacturing Practices." 

PHAR 705, 706. SPECIAL TOPICS IN 

PHARMACEUTICS (2, 2) 
Two laboratories. A study of the special prob- 
lems involved in the design, manufacturing 
and distribution of pharmaceutical products, 
including stabilization, preservation, optimiza- 
tion of drug availability, packaging and drug 
utilization. 



52 I University of Maryland 



PHAR 708. PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT 

LABORATORY (2-4) 
Each semester, laboratories and conferences as 
needed. Credit according to the amount of 
work undertaken after consultation with the 
instructor. Prerequisites: Consent of the in- 
structor. The development of new pharmaceu- 
tical or cosmetic preparations from concept 
through marketing. 

PHAR 709. PHARMACEUTICAL 

SEMINAR (1) 
Each semester. Required of students majoring 
in pharmacy. Reports of progress in research 
and surveys of recent developments in phar- 
macy. 

PHAR 801. PHYSICAL PHARMACY (3) 
Prerequisite: One year of college level physical 
chemistry. A study of pharmaceutical systems 



using the fundamentals of physical chemistry. 
In particular, the course aims to provide the 
graduate student with a deeper understanding 
of some fundamental concepts of thermody- 
namics. In addition, basic concepts of chemical 
kinetics will be introduced with applications 
to the deconposition of medicinal agents. 

PHAR 803, 804. PRODUCT DEVELOP- 
MENT (2, 2) 
Two laboratories. Prerequisites: PHAR 453, 
701, 702, 703, 704. A study of the development 
of new pharmaceutical preparations and cos- 
metics suitable for marketing. 

PHAR 799. THESIS RESEARCH 
Masters Level. Variable credit. Staff. 

PHAR 899. DISSERTATION RESEARCH 
Doctoral Level. Variable credit. Staff. 




School of Pharmacy / 53 



PHARMACY 

ADMINISTRATION 

(PADM) 

Professor: D. A. Knapp (Chairman) 
Associate Professor: Leavitt 
Assistant Professors: Fonaroff, Palumbo 
Lecturers: Fader, Kaufman 
Adjunct Staff: D. E. Knapp, Engel, Jang, 
McKelvey, West 

PADM 332. DRUG MARKETING (3) 
Spring term, three lectures. A study of the 
pharmaceutical industry and the distribution of 
drug products and pharmaceutical services. 
Special emphasis is placed on the patient and 
on the institutions involved in supplying health 
care to the patient. 

PADM 340. SOCIAL SCIENCES IN 

IN PHARMACY (2) 
Spring term, two lectures. A study of the 
application of the principles of the social 
sciences to patient care and health care sys- 
tems. 

PADM 342. PHARMACEUTICAL 

JURISPRUDENCE (3) 
Fall term, three lectures. Fundamentals of law 
of importance to pharmacists; federal and 
state laws and regulations pertaining to the 
sale of drugs, narcotics, poison and pharma- 
ceutical preparations. 

PADM 344. PHARMACY MANAGEMENT 

I (3) 
Spring term, three lectures. A study of the 
generation and utilization of accounting in- 
formation in the management of a community 
or institutional practice. 

PADM 351, 352. COMMUNITY PHAR- 
MACY MANAGEMENT II, III (2, 2) 
Fall and spring terms, four lectures /week for 
two months. Prerequisite: PADM 344. A study 
of the management problems of community 
pharmacy, including organization, staffing, di- 
recting, planning and control. 

PADM 354. DRUG ABUSE EDUCATION 

(1-3) 
Spring term. Practice and training in the dis- 
semination of drug information, especially drug 
abuse information to the public. 



PADM 448. SPECIAL PROJECTS 

(Var. 1-3) 
Independent investigations in the field of Phar- 
macy Administration, consisting of library and 
laboratory or field research, seminars, and/ or 
other assignments appropriate to the problem 
being investigated. 

PADM 452. INSTITUTIONAL PHAR- 
MACY MANAGEMENT (3) 
Spring term, six lectures/week for two months. 
A study of the application of management 
principles to the institutional environment with 
emphasis on the management systems ap- 
plicable to the hospital and extended care 
facility pharmacy. 

FOR DOCTOR OF 
PHARMACY STUDENTS 

PADM 470. HEALTH EDUCATION 

SEMINAR (2) 
Two sessions per week. The objective of this 
course is to provide the student with the 
knowledge needed to be an effective health 
educator to the patient and a therapeutic 
consultant to other health professionals. A 
partial listing of the knowledge base to be 
conveyed in the course includes: Attitudes, 
beliefs, and actions influencing health deci- 
sions; determinants of change in health-related 
behavior; interview skills for professional and 
patient communication; diagnosis of social, 
physical and behavioral potentials for carrying 
out personal health measures; Educational 
Diagnosis of methods to aid patient therapy; 
Selection of appropriate health education 
measures. 

NON-DEPARTMENTAL 
COURSES 

PHAR 342. APPLIED CALCULUS (4) 
Spring term, four lectures. An introduction to 
elements of differential and integral calculus as 
preparation for elementary physical chemistry 
and the pharmaceutical sciences. 

PHAR 457, 458. SPECIAL PROBLEMS 

I AND II (Var.) 
By permission of department. Independent 
investigation in the several pharmaceutical 
sciences, consisting of library and laboratory 
research and seminars. 



54 I University of Maryland 



BOARD OF REGENTS AND 
MARYLAND STATE BOARD 
OF AGRICULTURE 

CHAIRMAN 

Dr. Louis L. Kaplan 

3505 Fallstaff Road, Raltimore, Maryland 21215 

VICE-CHAIRMAN 

Richard W. Case 

Smith, Somerville and Case, 17th floor, One Charles 

Center, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

SECRETARY 

B. Herbert Brown 

4401 Roland Ave, Baltimore, Maryland 21210 

TREASURER 

Mr. F. Grove Miller 

Rt. 1, Box 133, North East, Maryland 21901 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 

Dr. Samuel Hoover 

507 Chadwick Road, Timonium, Maryland 21093 

ASSISTANT TREASURER 
Mrs. Mary H. Broadwater 
606 Orchard Road, Hagerstown, Maryland 21740 

Mr. Wm. Connelly 

1912 Saratoga Drive, Adelphi, Maryland 20783 

George C. Fry 
Cecilton, Maryland 21913 

Hon. Young D. Hance 

Secretary of Agriculture 

State Department of Agriculture 

Parole Plaza Office Building, Annapolis, Maryland 

21401 

Edward V. Hurley 

Commission on Human Relations, Mount Vernon 

Building, 701 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Maryland 

21202 

Mr. James S. Jacobs 

Suite 1106, Student Union Building, University of 

Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 

Hugh A. McMullen 

Geppert and McMullen, 21 Prospect Square, 

Cumberland, Maryland 21502 

Mr. L. Mercer Smith 

5113 Falls Road, Baltimore, Maryland 21210 

Joseph Tydings 

Donzansky, Dickey, Tydings, Quint and Gordon, 
1010 Bender Building, 1120 Connecticut Avenue, 
N.W., Washington, D.C. 20003 

Dr. Emerson C. Walden 

4200 Edmondson Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland 

21229 



OFFICERS OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF 
MARYLAND AT 
BALTIMORE 

PRESIDENT OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Wilson H. Elkins — B.A., University of Texas, 

1932; M.S., 1932; B.Litt., Oxford University, 1936; 

D.Phil., 1936. 

CHANCELLOR OF THE UNIVERSITY 

OF MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE 

Albin O. Kuhn — B.S., University of Maryland, 

1938; M.S., 1939; Ph.D., 1948. 

THE PRINCIPAL 
ACADEMIC OFFICERS 

THE PRINCIPAL ACADEMIC OFFICERS 
Errol L. Reese, Acting Dean, School of Dentistry, 
B.S., Fairmont State College, 1960; D.D.S., W. 
Virginia University, 1963; M.S., University of 
Detroit, 1968. 

Michael J. Kelly, Dean, School of Law, B.A., 
Princeton University, 1959; Ph.D., Cambridge 
University, 1964; L.L.B., Yale University, 1967. 

John M. Dennis, Dean, School of Medicine, B.S., 
University of Maryland, 1943; M.D., 1945. 

Marion I. Murphy, Dean, School of Nursing, B.S., 
University of Minnesota, 1936; M.P.H., University 
of Michigan, 1946; Ph.D., 1959. 

William J. Kinnard, Jr., Dean, School of Phar- 
macy, B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1953; M.S., 
1955; Ph.D., Purdue University, 1957. 

Dandzl Thursz, Dean, School of Social Work and 
Community Planning, B.S., Queens College, 1948; 
M.S.W., Catholic University, 1955; D.S.W., 1959. 

John D. Young, Jr., Acting Director, University 
of Maryland Hospital, B.A. Bridgewater College, 
1938; M.D., University of Maryland, 1941. 



OFFICERS FOR CENTRAL 
AND ADMINISTRATIVE 
SERVICES 

ASSISTANT TO THE CHANCELLOR 

W. Jackson Stenger, B.A., Washington College, 

1949; M.A., Georgetown University, 1959; Ph.D., 

1965. 

ASSISTANT TO THE CHANCELLOR 
Roy Borom, B.A., Wooster College, 1949; 
M.S.S.A., Western Reserve University School of 
Applied Social Sciences, 1951. 



School of Pharmacy / 55 



DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
Robert C. Brown, B.A., University of Maryland, 
1963. 

DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS AND 

REGISTRATIONS 

Wayne A. Smith, B.S., University of Maryland, 

1962. 

DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL 

Ronald J. Baril, B.S., Bridgewater State College. 

DIRECTOR OF PHYSICAL PLANT 

Robert L. Walton, B.S., University of Maryland, 

1938. 

DIRECTOR OF STUDENT HEALTH 
Wilfred H. Townshend, B.S., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1936; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1940. 

DIRECTOR, UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
Walter T. Brown, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1964; M.Ed., American University, 1971. 

LIBRARIAN AND ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 
OF LIBRARY SCIENCES 

Hilda E. Moore, B.A., Randolph-Macon Womens 
College, 1936; B.S., Emory University Library 
School, 1937. 

ACTING DIRECTOR, CENTER FOR 

EDUCATIONAL COMPUTING 

DEVELOPMENT 

Linda Bradley, A.B., Goucher College, 1969. 



UNIVERSITY OF 
MARYLAND CENTRAL 
ADMINISTRATION 

PRESIDENT 

Wilson H. Elkins — B.A., University of Texas, 
1932; M.S., 1932; B.Litt., Oxford University, 1936; 
D.Phil., 1936. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 
R. Lee Hornbake — B.S., California State College, 
Pennsylvania, 1934; M.A., Ohio State University, 
1936; Ph.D., 1942. 

VICE-PRESIDENT FOR 
GENERAL ADMISSIONS 

Donald W. O'Connell — B.A., Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1937; M.A., 1938; Ph.D., 1953. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR 
GRADUATE STUDIES AND RESEARCH 
Michael J. Pelczar, Jr. — B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D., State Univer- 
sity of Iowa, 1941. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR 
AGRICULTURAL AFFAIRS 

Frank L. Bentz, Jr. — B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1942; Ph.D., 1952. 



OFFICERS OF THE SCHOOL 
OF PHARMACY 

Wilson H. Elkins, President 

B.A., University of Texas, 1932; M.A., 1932; 
B.Litt., Oxford University, 1936; D.Phil., 1936. 

Albin O. Kuhn, Chancellor of the University of 
Maryland at Baltimore 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; 
Ph.D., 1948. 

William J. Kinnard, Jr., Dean and Professor of 
Pharmacology and Toxicology 
B.S. in Pharmacy, University of Pittsburgh, 1953; 
M.S., 1955; Ph.D., Purdue University, 1957. 

Dean E. Leavitt, Assistant Dean for Student Af- 
fairs and Associate Professor of Pharmacy Ad- 
ministration 

B.S. in Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 1954; 
M.S., 1957; M.B.A., 1964; Ph.D., Purdue Uni- 
versity, 1968. 

Julian L. Morgan, Administrative Assistant to the 
Dean 
B.A., Benedict College, Columbia, S.C., 1964. 

Henry G. Seidman, Director of Continuing Edu- 
cation 
Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1930. 

Casimir T. Ichniowski, Director of Student Finan- 
cial Aid and Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 
and Toxicology 

Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1929; B.S. in 
Pharmacy, 1930; M.S., 1932; Ph.D., 1936. 

Michael W. Skinner, Director of Minority Affairs 
B.A., Morgan State College, 1968. 



FACULTY (1974-75) 

EMERITUS 

Noel E. Foss, Dean Emeritus 

Ph.G. and B.S. in Pharmacy, South Dakota State 
University, 1929; M.S., University of Maryland, 
1932; Ph.D., 1933. 

PROFESSORS 

Ralph N. Blomster, Professor of Pharmacognosy 
B.S. in Pharmacy, Massachusetts College of 
Pharmacy, 1953; M.S., University of Pittsburgh, 
1958; Ph.D., University of Connecticut, 1963. 

Naim Khazan, Professor of Pharmacology and 
Toxicology 

Ph.G., College of Pharmacy and Chemistry, 
Baghdad, Iraq, 1943; Ph.D., Hebrew University, 
Israel, 1960. 

David A. Knapp, Professor of Pharmacy Adminis- 
tration 

B.S. in Pharmacy, Purdue University, 1960; 
M.S., 1962; Ph.D., 1965. 

Peter P. Lamy, Professor of Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharmacy, Philadelphia College of Phar- 
macy and Science, 1956; M.S., 1958; Ph.D., 
1964. 



56 I University of Maryland 



Ralph F. Shangraw, Professor of Pharmacy 
B.S. in Pharmacy, Massachusetts College of 
Pharmacy, 1952; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., University 
of Michigan, 1959. 

Nicolas Zenker, Professor of Medicinal Chemistry 
C.D.SC.CH., University of Louvain (Belgium), 
1948; M.A., University of California, 1953; 
Ph.D., 1958. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 

Benjamin F. Allen, Associate Professor of Phar- 
macy 

B.S. in Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 1937; 

Ph.D., 1949. 
Larry L. Augsburger, Associate Professor of 

Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 1962; 

M.S., 1965; Ph.D., 1967. 
Gary G. Buterbaugh, Associate Professor of Phar- 
macology and Toxicology 

B.S., Chemistry, Iowa State University, 1965; 

M.S., University of Iowa, 1967; Ph.D., 1969. 
S. Edward Krikorian, Associate Professor of 

Medicinal Chemistry 

B.Sc. in Chemistry, Brown University, 1951; 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 

1967. 
James Leslie, Associate Professor of Medicinal 

Chemistry 

B.Sc, Queens University, Belfast, Northern Ire- 
land, 1956; Ph.D., 1959. 
Jeremy Wright, Associate Professor of Medicinal 

Chemistry 

B.S., University of Manchester, England, 1961; 

Ph.D., Chelsea College, University of London, 

England, 1965. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Joseph S. Adir, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 
and Pharmacology and Toxicology 
M.Pharm., Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel, 
1961; Ph.D., State University of New York, 1972. 

David R. Brown, Assistant Professor of Pharma- 
cology and Toxicology 

B.S., Cornell University, 1958; M.S., University 
of California (Berkeley), 1967; D.Sc, Harvard 
University, 1970. 

Patrick S. Callery, Assistant Professor of Medic- 
inal Chemistry 

B.S., University of Utah, 1968; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of California (San Francisco), 1973. 

Arlene Fonaroff, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 
Administration 

B.A., University of California, 1965; M.P.H., 
1967; M.Phil., George Washington University, 
1972; Ph.D., 1973. 

David G. Hattan, Assistant Professor of Pharma- 
cology and Toxicology 

A. A., Independence Community College, 1962; 
B.Sc. in Pharmacy, University of Kansas, 1965; 
Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1973. 

Benjamin Hodes, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 
B.S., Union University, 1960; M.S., University of 
Michigan, 1971; Ph.D., 1972. 



Michael D. Loberg, Assistant Professor of Phar- 
macy and Medicinal Chemistry 
B.S., Trinity College, 1969; M.S., Washington 
University, 1972; Ph.D., 1973. 

Robert T. Louis-Ferdinand, Assistant Professor 
of Pharmacology and Toxicology 
B.S., St. Francis College, 1959; M.S., University 
of Rhode Island, 1969; Ph.D., 1970. 

J. Edward Moreton, Assistant Professor of Phar- 
macology and Toxicology 

B.S., University of Mississippi, 1966; Ph.D., 
1971. 

Francis B. Palumbo, Assistant Professor of Phar- 
macy Administration 

B.S., Medical College of South Carolina, 1968; 
M.S., Health Care Administration, University of 
Mississippi, 1973; Ph.D., University of Missis- 
sippi, 1974. 

Gary M. Oderda, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 
and Director, Maryland Poison Information 
Center 
Pharm.D., University of California, 1972. 

David M. Richman, Assistant Professor of Phar- 
macy 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1960; M.S., 1963; 
Ph.D., 1966. 

David S. Roffman, Assistant Professor of Phar- 
macy 

B.S., in Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 1970; 
M.S., 1973. 

Karl-Heinz A. Rosler, Assistant Professor of 
Pharmacognosy 

Pharmazeutisches Staatsexamen, University of 
Munich, Germany, 1956; Dr. Rer. nat, 1960. 

Jerry D. Skarbek, Assistant Professor of Pharma- 
cognosy 

B.S. in Pharmacy, University of Michigan, 1969; 
Ph.D., University of Washington, 1974. 

Dianne E. Tobias, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 
Pharm.D., University of California, 1971. 

Theodore H. van der Hoeven, Assistant Professor 
of Medicinal Chemistry 

B.S. Brooklyn College, 1965; Ph.D., Columbia 
University, 1971. 

Thomas H. Wiser, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 
B.S., University of Minnesota, 1971; Pharm.D., 
1973. 

INSTRUCTORS 

William H. Edmondson, Instructor in Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 1966. 
Tim S. Fuller, Instructor in Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharmacy, University of Washington, 

1969; M.S., Ohio State University, 1974. 
Ruth E. Hoppe, Instructor in Pharmacy 

B.S., Michigan State University, 1965; M.D., 

University of Michigan, 1969. 
John M. Hoopes, Instructor in Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharmacy, Ohio Northern University; 

Pharm.D., Duquesne University, 1973. 
Robert J. Michocki, Instructor in Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 1971; 

M.S., 1974. 



School of Pharmacy / 57 



ASSOCIATES 

Anthony C. Tommasello, Associate in Pharmacy 
B.S. in Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 1973. 

LECTURERS 

John F. Fader, II, Lecturer in Pharmacy Admin- 
istration 

B.S. in Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 1950; 
LL.B., 1953. 

Joseph S. Kaufman, Lecturer in Pharmacy Ad- 
ministration 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1950; LL.B., 1953. 

ADJUNCT STAFF 

PROFESSORS 

C. Jelleff Carr, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacol- 
ogy and Toxicology 

Henry M. Fales, Ph.D., Professor of Medicinal 
Chemistry 

Donald E. Shay, Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology 

Elmer G. Worthley, Ph.D., Professor of Plxar- 
macognosy 

Seymour Yolles, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacy 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Henry C. Freimuth, M.D., Associate Professor of 

Pharmacology and Toxicology 
William M. Heller, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 

Pharmacy 
Deanne Knapp, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 

Pharmacy Administration 
Harvey J. Kupferberg, Ph.D., Associate Professor 

of Pharmacology and Toxicology 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Charles P. Barrett, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
Pharmacology and Toxicology 

Ralph Engel, B.S., J.D., Assistant Professor in 
Pharmacy Administration 

Lee T. Grady, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Medic- 
inal Chemistry 

Raymond Jang, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Phar- 
macy Administration 

Winifred Sewell, B.S., Assistant Professor of 
Pharmacy 

Sheila West, Pharm.D., Assistant Professor of 
Pharmacy Administration 

INSTRUCTORS 

Cornelius P. McKelvey, M.S., Instructor of 
Pharmacy Administration 

CLINICAL STAFF 

PROFESSORS 

Edward J. Kowalewski, M.D., Clinical Professor 
of Pharmacy 

William S. Spicer, Jr., M.D., Professor of Phar- 
macy 

Theodore E. Woodward, M.D., Clinical Professor 
of Pharmacy 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Samuel L. Fox, M.D., Clinical Associate Professor 

of Pharmacy 
Morton L. Rapoport, M.D., Clinical Associate 

Professor of Pharmacy 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Patrick Birmingham, B.S., Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Pharmacy 

Rachel Z. Booth, R.N., M.S., Clinical Assistant 
Professor of Pharmacy 

Vincent dePaul Burkhart, M.S., Clinical Assist- 
ant Professor of Pharmacy 

Henry J. Derewicz, M.S., Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Pharmacy 

Clarence L. Fortner, M.S., Clinical Assistant 
Professor of Pharmacy 

Ronald Goldner, M.D., Clinical Assistant Profes- 
sor of Pharmacy 

Robert A. Kerr, Pharm.D., Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Pharmacy 

Thomas E. Patrick, B.S., Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Pharmacy 

Arthur N. Riley, M.S., Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Pharmacy 

Robert E. Snyder, B.S., Clinical Assistant Profes- 
sor of Pliarmacy 

Harold G. Standiford, M.D., Clinical Assistant 
Professor of Pharmacy 

INSTRUCTORS (Institutional Preceptors) 

Adolph P. Biasini, B.S., Clinical Instructor of 
Pharmacy 

Richard J. Brodeur, B.S., Clinical Instructor in 
Pharmacy 

Mary W. Connelly, B.S., Clinical Instructor of 
Pharmacy 

William C. Harris, J.D., Clinical Instructor of 
Pharmacy 

William E. Jaffe, B.S., Clinical Instructor of 
Pharmacy 

Alan J. Jaskulski, B.S., Clinical Instructor of 
Pharmacy 

Kent T. Johnson, B.S., Clinical Instructor of 
Pharmacy 

Charles Kight, B.S., Clinical Instructor of Phar- 
macy 

Frank Koller, Pharm.D., Clinical Instructor of 
Pharmacy 

Sam Lighter, B.S., Clinical Instructor of Phar- 
macy 

Sol Rosenstein, B.S., Clinical Instructor of Phar- 
macy 

Richard Rumrill, Pharm.D., Clinical Instructor of 
Pharmacy 

June H. Shaw, B.S., Clinical Instructor of Phar- 
macy 

Paul Smith, B.S., Clinical Instructor of Pharmacy 

Irwin Title, B.S., Clinical Instructor of Pharmacy 

INSTRUCTORS (Community Preceptors) 

Morton Abarbanel, B.S., Clinical Instructor in 
Pharmacy 

Samuel Bialek, B.S., Clinical Instructor in Phar- 
macy 

Jerome Block, B.S., Clinical Instructor in Phar- 
macy 

Morris Bookoff, B.S., Clinical Instructor in Phar- 
macy 



58 I University of Maryland 



Robert H. Campbell, B.S., Clinical Instructor in 
Pharmacy 

Leon R. Catlett, B.S., Clinical Instructor in 
Pharmacy 

Gerald I. Cohen, B.S., Clinical Instructor in 
Pharmacy 

John W. Conrad, Jr., B.S., Clinical Instructor in 
Pharmacy 

James P. Cragg, Jr., B.S., Clinical Instructor in 
Pharmacy 

James B. Culp, Jr., B.S., Clinical Instructor in 
Pharmacy 

Jerry Deckter, B.S., Clinical Instructor in Phar- 
macy 

Patricia DeMichaelis, B.S., Clinical Instructor 
in Pharmacy 

Joseph U. Dorsch, B.S., Clinical Instructor in 
Pfiarmacy 

Donald B. Elliott, B.S., Clinical Instructor in 
Pharmacy 

Paul Freiman, B.S., Clinical Instructor in Phar- 
macy 

Herman Classband, B.S., Clinical Instructor in 
Pharmacy 

Harold H. Greenhouse, B.S., Clinical Instructor 
in Pharmacy 

Robert W. Henderson, B.S., Clinical Instructor 
in Pharmacy 

Stephen Hospodavis, B.S., Clinical Instructor in 
Pharmacy 

I. Dennis Klein, B.S., Clinical Instructor in Phar- 
macy 



Mary Lee, B.S., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 

Ronald Lubman, B.S., Clinical Instructor in Phar- 
macy 

Nicholas Lykos, B.S., Clinical Instructor in Phar- 
macy 

Martin B. Mintz, B.S., Clinical Instructor in 
Pharmacy 

Victor H. Morcenroth, Jr., B.S., Clinical In- 
structor in Pharmacy 

John Newcomb, B.S., Clinical Instructor in Phar- 
macy 

Marvin L. Oed, B.S., Clinical Instructor in Phar- 
macy 

Anthony G. Padussis, B.S., Clinical Instructor in 
Pharmacy 

Richard D. Parker, Jr., B.S., Clinical Instructor 
in Pfiarmacy 

Richard M. Pilquist, B.S., Clinical Instructor in 
Pharmacy 

J. Edward Poklis, B.S., Clinical Instructor in 
Pharmacy 

Charles Powell, B.S., Clinical Instructor in Phar- 
macy 

Chester L. Price, B.S., Clinical Instructor in 
Pharmacy 

Edward B. Roth, B.S., Clinical Instructor in Phar- 
macy 

Melvin N. Rubin, B.S., Clinical Instructor in 
Pharmacy 

Kurt Sacki, B.S., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 

Jim Sand, B.S., Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 




School of Pharmacy I 59 



Howard Schiff, B.S., Clinical Instructor in Phar- 
macy 

Howard Sherman, B.S., Clinical Instructor in 
Pharmacy 

Irving E. Swartz, B.S., Clinical Instructor in 
Pharmacy 

Vito Tinelli, Jr., B.S., Clinical Instructor in 
Pharmacy 

Bernard White, B.S., Clinical Instructor in Phar- 
macy 

Michael Weinstein, B.S., Clinical Instructor in 
Piiarmacy 

Jonas Yousem, B.S., Clinical Instructor in Phar- 
macy 

GBADUATE ASSISTANTS 

Viviana Amzel, Assistant in Medicinal Chemistry 
B.S., Universidad de Central Venezuela, 1963. 

Juanita Anders, Assistant in Pharmacology and 
Toxicology 

Carroll D. Arnett, Assistant in Medicinal Chem- 
istry 
A.B., in Chemistry, Duke University, 1968. 

David P. Beach, Assistant in Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharmacy, Albany College of Pharmacy, 
1973. 

William C. Faith, Assistant in Medicinal Chem- 
istry 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1973. 

Vasilios C. Frankos, Assistant in Pharmacology 
and Toxicology 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1970; M.S., 1973. 



Jeffrey D. Caber, Assistant in Pliarmacology and 

Toxicology 

B.A., Emory University, 1974. 
Bonald J. Cerson, Assistant in Pharmacology and 

Toxicology 

B.A., State University of New York, 1974. 
Bonnie J. Kane, Assistant in Pharmacology and 

Toxicology 

B.S., Salisbury State College, 1974. 
David W. McCourt, Assistant in Medicinal Chem- 
istry 

B.S., Boanoke College, 1974. 
Atul M. Mehta, Assistant in Pharmacy 

B.S., Shivaji University, India, 1972. 
Keith S. Botenberg, Assistant in Pharmacy 

B. A., University of California, (Berkeley), 1973. 
Manoj N. Shah, Assistant in Pharmacy 

B.S., L.M. College of Pharmacy, India, 1972. 
Larry E. Small, Assistant in Pharmacy 

B.S., Union University, 1971. 
Frank Vocci, Assistant in Pharmacology and 

Toxicology 

B.S., Loyola College, 1971. 
David H. Woodside, Assistant in Pharmacology 

B.S., Univ. of Pennsylvania, 1972. 

FELLOWS 

C. Bichard Crooks, H.A. B. Dunning Fellow 

B.S. in Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 1969. 
Barbara E. Dorsch, AFPE Fellow 

B.S. in Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 1972. 
Edythe D. London, Emerson Fellow 

B.S., George Washington University, 1969; M.S., 

Towson State College, 1973. 



60 I University of Maryland 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

1975-76 



AUGUST 


25-26 




27 




28 


SEPTEMBER 


1 


OCTOBER 


24 


NOVEMBER 


27-30 




(inc.) 


DECEMBER 


19 



FALL SEMESTER 

Undergraduate and Graduate Student Registration 

Orientation 

Instruction begins: Undergraduate and Graduate Programs 

Labor Day — Holiday 

Didactic Sessions End ( Fifth Year Students ) 

Thanksgiving Recess 

Semester Ends: Undergraduate and Granduate Students 



WINTER SEMESTER 



DECEMBER 


11-12 


Registration 


JANUARY 


5 


Instruction begins 


JANUARY 


15 


Martin Luther King, Jr., Birthday — Holiday 


JANUARY 


30 


Sessions Ends 



FEBRUARY 


4-6 




9 




16 


APRIL 


2 


APRIL 


16-19 


MAY 


27 




30 


TUNE 


3 



SPRING SEMESTER 

Undergraduate and Graduate Student Registration 

Instruction begins 

Washington's Birthday — Holiday 

Didactic Session Ends (Section A-Fifth Year) 

Spring Recess 

Semester Ends 

Didactic Session Ends (Section B-Fifth Year) 

Memorial Day — Holiday 

Commencement 



The seven separate circles represent the six schools — dentis- 
try, law, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, social work and com- 
munity planning — and the University Hospital. The interlock- 
ing pattern they form represents the total identity of the 
University of Maryland at Baltimore. 



School of Pharmacy 

University of Maryland 

Baltimore, Maryland 

21201 



SCHOOL OF 
PHARMACY 
1977-1979 

University of Maryland | 
at Baltimore ^ 




UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904 



1977-1979 

CATALOGUE AND 

128th ANNOUNCEMENT 



Volume 51 

Number 1 

January, 1977 



CONTENTS 



Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy Program 

Aims and Objectives / 5 
Application Procedure and Admission / 9 

Fees and Expenses /11 

Curriculum /15 

Courses of Instruction /20 

Employment Prospectus /23 

Faculty /24 

Pharm.D. Program 

Goals and Competency Objectives /27 

Admissions Requirements /28 

Curriculum /29 

Faculty /31 

Courses of Instruction /32 

Fees and Expenses /35 

Graduate Program 

Medicinal Chemistry /39 
Pharmacology and Toxicology /42 

Pharmacy /45 

Institutional Pharmacy /50 

Pharmacognosy /51 

Campus Map /55 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
IN PHARMACY 
PROGRAM 



The University of Maryland seeks to provide equal educational opportunities without 
regard to race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, or handicap. This policy 
extends to employment, admission, and all programs and activities supported by the 
university. 

The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract 
between the student and the University of Maryland. Changes are effected from time 
to time in the general regulations and in the academic requirements. There are 
established procedures for making changes, procedures which protect the institu- 
tion's integrity and the individual student's interest and welfare. When the actions of a 
student are judged by competent authority, using established procedure, to be 
detrimental to the interests of the university community, that person may be required 
to withdraw from the university. 




AIMS AND OBJECTIVES 

OF THE SCHOOL 

OF PHARMACY 

As the only school of pharmacy in Maryland and as part of the state university, the 
University of Maryland School of Pharmacy accepts definite responsibilities for 
undergraduate, graduate and continuing education of pharmacists and those 
interested in the pharmaceutical sciences, and the conduct of original research to 
advance scientific and professional knowledge. Graduates of the school serve as 
community, hospital and industrial pharmacists and their educational background 
qualifies them for professional service in educational and governmental regulatory or 
environmental control agencies. Pharmacy graduates are uniquely qualified to pursue 
advanced study in the bio-medical and other health-care related sciences. Recent 
developments suggest that the pharmacist will become a patient-oriented drug expert. 
The school accepts this concept of an emerging new role of the pharmacist and the 
curriculum is designed to enable the graduate to take a more meaningful part in health 
care at the institutional and community level. 

In meeting its teaching obligations, the school provides a curriculum and faculty 
capable of offering students an educational experience beyond training for the 
practice of pharmacy. In addition to acquiring the facts and techniques for 
pharmaceutical practice, graduates are able to employ the new advances in the 
medical science as they relate to the recent trends to meet the growing needs for 
health care. 

The new role of the pharmacist required training not only in chemistry, physical 
chemical properties, stability and pharmaceutical nature of drugs, but advanced 
training in clinical pharmacy and pharmacology. The School of Pharmacy has 
modernized its curriculum to permit its graduates to play an important part with the 
physician in drug selection and monitoring patient therapy, with early recognition of 
potential adverse drug effects. 

The aims and objectives of the clinical program in pharmaceutical education in the 
school include the opportunity for interaction with other students and professional 
people in the Schools of Medicine, Dentistry, Nursing, Social Work and Community 
Planning, and Law. This interaction will enhance the opportunities for development of 
the informational role of the pharmacist to bring him closer to the physician as a 
recognized source of dependable information about drugs and therapeutic agents. 
Familiarity with the literature and methods of information retrieval and distribution are 
considered indispensible to a modern practitioner of pharmacy. 

The school accepts its responsibility for recruiting and training programs for minority 
groups or disadvantaged students to bring them to the educational level required for 
the practice of pharmacy. Without lowering admission standards or modifying the 
educational requirements, students of these groups within our society can participate 
in the educational processes in order that they can take their professional place in 
providing health care services. 

The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy has had a long tradition of providing 
outstanding graduate programs and recognizes its obligation to continually strengthen 
and modify them on the basis of the needs of the scientific community and society. A 
strong graduate program is essential to attracting outstanding faculty and to their 
continuing development as scientists and teachers. In addition, a strong graduate 
program fulfills a basic goal of the university in terms of elucidating new knowledge 
through various types of basic and applied research and supplying graduate level 
scientists to government, industry and education. 



One of the major strengths of graduate programs in the various departments of the 
School of Pharmacy is the interrelativity of course work and research interests. 
Interdisciplinary approaches to graduate education and research are and will continue 
to be stressed. Taking cognizance of the present concerns of graduate education, in 
terms of quality and quantity, the School of Pharmacy will continue to emphasize 
programs of limited size but high auality. 

Inherent in the activities of the school is the obligation to serve as the focal point of 
leadership for the profession of pharmacy in Maryland, and provide expertise to the 
community in related fields. The school is continuing to meet its public responsi- 
bilities as an information source, training professionals, and operating a drug abuse 
education program, and a poison information center. In all these areas, it is not only 
fulfilling the needs of the citizens of the state but it is contributing to knowledge in the 
healing arts. 

HISTORY 

The first suggestion of a college of pharmacy in Baltimore emanated from William F. 
Fisher, M.D., who established a pharmacy in the city about 1834. He was professor of 
botany in the School of Arts and Sciences, University of Maryland (Baltimore) and in 
1837 was made professor of chemistry in the School of Medicine. Of Dr. Fisher's "plan" 
we know nothing further than that he had formed one and that it met with favor among 
his medical colleagues (a sudden illness prevented his participation in its 1837 
execution). Also, in 1837, a convention of Eastern Shore physicians in Easton, Maryland 
made a demand on the General Assembly of Maryland for the establishment of a 
college of pharmacy. 

The Maryland College of Pharmacy, the oldest pharmacy school in the South, was 
organized in the City of Baltimore on July 20, 1840, by a progressive group of Baltimore 
physicians (several were associated with the University of Maryland) and apothecaries 
to provide systematic instruction in pharmacy and related sciences. The college, 
incorporated on January 27, 1841, gave its first lectures in November. 

During a brief association (1844-1847) of the old Maryland College of Pharmacy with 
the old, privately-owned and operated University of Maryland in Baltimore City 
(northeast corner of Lombard and Greene Streets), the first professorship of pharmacy 
in the United States was established. David Stewart, M.D., an alumnus of the School of 
Medicine (1844) was elected professor of pharmacy (1844-1846). 

From 1848-1903, the old college operated as an independent institution at various 
locations in the city. In 1904, the Maryland College of Pharmacy became the 
Department of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland (Baltimore). In 1920, the 
Baltimore professional schools (University of Maryland) merged with Maryland State 
College (College Park) to form the state university. 

From the very beginning, the school has made many noteworthy contributions to the 
advancement of pharmacy. In addition to the first separate professorship in the theory 
and practice of pharmacy (1844), some other firsts include the establishment of a chair 
of analytical chemistry (1872) and an obligatory course in analytical chemistry for the 
pharmacy student. 

Alpheus Phineas Sharp, one of the first graduates from the newly-opened Maryland 
College of Pharmacy, read the first scientific paper before the American Pharma- 
ceutical Association in New York City (1855). Merck, Sharp & Dohme can trace its 
origin to the opening of his apothecary shop in Baltimore. 

In 1870, the college called the first convention of representatives of pharmacy schools 
to formulate uniform standards for the graduation of students. The convention was 
held in Baltimore and was the forerunner of the American Association of Colleges of 



Pharmacy. Many of the early pharmaceutical laws enacted by the legislature of the 
State of Maryland were initiated and fostered by the school. 

The school was one of the first in America to give a special course in prescription 
compounding, consisting of both lectures and laboratory work and the first to add a 
separate chair of commercial pharmacy and dispensing (1900). 

Graduate courses were first outlined in 1928 and this inaugurated an era of high caliber 
graduate work which added much to the development and prestige of the school. 

The school was among the first schools of pharmacy to have a full-time pharmacology 
department (1930) and the first laboratory in a pharmacy school for instruction in 
biochemical assays. 

The first accreditation conference of pharmacy schools was held at the University 
of Maryland in 1932. This established the American Council for Pharmaceutical 
Education. 

The dual efforts of the School of Pharmacy and the Maryland Board of Pharmacy 
resulted in 1970 in a major change in the traditional pharmacy curriculum and 
internship requirements. Maryland became the first state in the nation to eliminate the 
unstructured internship program and replace it with a professional experience 
program that was incorporated in the school's curriculum. 

ACCREDITATION 

The School of Pharmacy is accredited by the American Council on Pharmaceutical 
Education. The school holds membership in the American Association of Colleges 
of Pharmacy. 

DEGREES 

The School of Pharmacy offers courses leading to the following degrees: Bachelor of 
Science in Pharmacy, Doctor of Pharmacy, Master of Science, and Doctor of 
Philosophy. The general procedures to be followed by undergraduate students are set 
forth in the following paragraphs. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy will be conferred upon students who 
have successfully completed the pre-professional program and the three-year 
professional program as outlined later in this bulletin. 




The Doctor of Pharmacy degree will be conferred upon students who have successfully 
completed the pre-professional program, the first two years of the Bachelor of Science 
in Pharmacy program and the two years of the Pharm.D. program. The school 
publishes a separate bulletin on the Pharm.D. and graduate programs. 

Candidates for advanced degrees must register in the Graduate School of the 
university. For detailed information, see the catalog of the Graduate School. 

STUDENT HEALTH 

The Baltimore Campus of the university maintains a Student Health Service for a fee of 
$10.00 per annum, payable at registration in September. A student's wife or child, or 
other members of his family, are not eligible for health care service unless the wife, too, 
is a student and has paid the fee for herself. At the beginning of the entering year, each 
student will be given a physical examination. 

The Student Health Service facility is located on the first floor of Howard Hall (660 West 
Redwood Street), and is open from 8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. 
When the office is closed, students may report to the emergency room of 
the University of Maryland Hospital, if absolutely necessary. 

If this is a true emergency, the health service will pay the emergency room fee. 
Otherwise, the student will be billed. 

All students are required to carry Blue Cross hospitalization insurance or its equivalent. 
In addition, it is recommended that all students be covered by Blue Shield, or its 
equivalent, to cover physicians' and surgeons' fees. 

Additional information regarding the Student Health Service may be obtained in the 
Office of Administration of the School of Pharmacy. 

CORRESPONDENCE 

All correspondence referring to entrance into the pre-professional program of the 
school should be directed to the accredited junior or senior college having pre- 
professional programs. In the case of the University of Maryland campuses, 
correspondence should be directed to the following: 

College Park 

Director of Admissions 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742 

University of Maryland 
Baltimore County Campus 

Office of Admission and Registration 

University of Maryland, Baltimore County 

Dorm 2 

5401 Wilkens Avenue 

Baltimore, Maryland 21228 

University of Maryland 
Eastern Shore Campus 

Director of Admissions 

University of Maryland, Eastern Shore 

Room 311, Maryland Hall 

Princess Anne, Maryland 21853 

All correspondence relative to entrance into the professional programs should be 
addressed to the School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 636 West Lombard 
Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 



APPLICATION PROCEDURE 
AND ADMISSION 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
IN PHARMACY 

School of Pharmacy 
Baltimore Campus 

APPLICATION PROCEDURES 

Candidates seeking admission to the School of Pharmacy in Baltimore should write to 
the Dean's Office, University of Maryland, 636 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland 21201. Applicants wishing advice on any problem relative to their application 
should communicate with the above office. 

ADMISSION TO THE PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS AT BALTIMORE 

Students of all races, colors and creeds are equally admissible. It is the objective of the 
University of Maryland, Baltimore City Campus to enroll students with diversified 
backgrounds in order to make the educational experience more meaningful for 
each student. 

PREREQUISITES FOR APPLICATION CONSIDERATION 

Applicants must present evidence of having successfully completed the required pre- 
professional program, or be enrolled in the final semester leading to completion of 
that program. In addition, applicants must have taken the Pharmacy College 
Admissions Test (PCAT) and had the test results submitted along with the other records 
required by the applicant. The minimum scholastic quality point average for 
application consideration is 2.25. 

APPLICATION DEADLINES 

All applications must be received by the Admissions Office by April 1st and all 
supportive records necessary for completion of the total application received by May 
1st. It is the responsibility of the applicant to insure that all these records are filed with 
the Admissions Office. 

APPLICATION SELECTION PROCEDURES 

An admissions committee consisting of faculty members and representatives of the 
student body consider all applications meeting the required standards. The committee 
considers the applicant's academic achievement, extracurricular activities, personal 
characteristics as determined by interviews by the committee members, and the scores 
on the Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT). Academic achievement and/or high 
scores in the PCAT do not in themselves ensure acceptance. Also of concern to the 
committee are the professional and social awareness, communication skills, integrity, 
maturity and motivation of the applicant. It should be pointed out to applicants that 
while a minimal QPA of 2.25 is required for application consideration, the average QPA 
of entering students is approximately 3.0. The fact, coupled with the multiple 
applications for each available position in the entering class, gives these applicants 
with QPA's below 2.5 extremely low probabilities for admission. 

DETERMINATION OF IN-STATE STATUS FOR ADMISSION, 
TUITION AND CHARGE DIFFERENTIAL PURPOSES* 

An initial determination of in-state status for admission, tuition and charge differential 
purposes will be made by the university at the time a student's application for admis- 



sion is under consideration. The determination made at that time and any 
determination made thereafter shall prevail in each semester until the determination is 
successfully challenged prior to the last day available for registration for the forth- 
coming semester. A determination regarding in-state status may be changed for any 
subsequent semester if circumstances, as later defined, warrant redetermination. 

GENERAL POLICY 

1. It is the policy of the University of Maryland to grant in-state status for admission, 
tuition and charge differential purposes to United States citizens and to immigrant 
aliens lawfully admitted for permanent residence in accordance with the laws of the 
United States, in the following cases: 

a. Where a student is financially dependent upon a parent, parents or spouse 
domiciled in Maryland for at least six consecutive months prior to the last day 
available for registration for the forthcoming semester. 

b. Where a student is financially independent for at least the preceding 12 months, 
and provided the student has maintained his domicile in Maryland for at least six 
consecutive months immediately prior to the last day available for registration for 
the forthcoming semester. 

c. Where a student is a spouse or a dependent child of a full-time employee of the 
university. 

d. Where a student who is a member of the Armed Forces of the United States is 
stationed on active duty in Maryland for at least six consecutive months 
immediately prior to the last day available for registration for the forthcoming 
semester, unless such student has been assigned for educational purposes to 
attend the University of Maryland. 

e. Where a student is a full-time employee of the University of Maryland. 

2. It is the policy of the University of Maryland to attribute out-of-state status for 
admission, tuition and charge differential purposes in all other cases. 

3. Each campus of the university will be responsible for making the in-state 
determination for the prospective or enrolled student. 

4. In-state status is lost at any time a financially independent student established a 
domicile outside the State of Maryland. If the parent(s) or other persons through 
whom the student has attained in-state status establishes a domicile in another state, 
the student shall be assessed out-of-state tuition and charges six months after the out- 
of-state move occurs. 

APPEALS 

A student or applicant who disagrees with his classification may request a personal 
interview with the Director of Admissions and Registrations or his designee at which 
time the student will have an opportunity to present any and all evidence he may have 
bearing on his classification and to answer any questions which have been raised about 
his status. 

If the decision is adverse to him, a student may further file a written appeal to the Office 
of the President of the university. The decision of the president of the university or his 
designee shall be final. 

The word "domicile" as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent place 
of abode. For the purpose of this rule, only one domicile may be maintained at a 
given time. 



* A complete statement of this policy is available from the Office of Admissions, 
Room 132, Howard Hall, 660 West Redwood Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 



10 



FEES 
AND EXPENSES 



BALTIMORE CAMPUS 
1976-77 Academic Year 

Per Semester 

Tuition — In-State $ 375.00 

Out-of-State 1090.00 

Tuition — Part-time undergraduate per credit (8 credits or less) 34.00 

Instructional Resources Fee (Full-time) 15.00 

Instructional Resources Fee (Part-time) 7.50 

Supporting Facilities Fee (Full-time) 30.00 

Supporting Facilities Fee (Part-time) 6.00 

Student Activities Fee (Full and Part-time) 10.00 

Student Health Fee (Full-time) 5.00 

Student Health Fee (Part-time) 2.00 

Health Insurance (Blue Cross)* 

One Person 65.88 

Two Persons 135.06 

Family 177.54 

Clinical Clerkship Fee (5th year only) 50.00 

Dormitory Fee 339.50 



* Student Health Care Program. Health insurance is required of all full-time pro- 
fessional schools (nine or more semester hours) in addition to the Student Health Fee. 
A student with equivalent insurance coverage must provide proof of such member- 
ship to his dean at the time of registration and obtain a hospital insurance waiver. 

The University of Maryland at Baltimore, Health Care Program for its student body 
consists of the following: Blue Cross, Blue Shield, Diagnostic and Major Medical 
coverage. Additional information concerning the program may be obtained from the 
Student Health Office. 

OTHER FEES AND EXPENSES 

Application Fee (non-returnable) $ 15.00 

Books and Supplies, approximately 150.00-225.00 

Breakage — Students are required to pay for all breakage in excess of $5.00 per year 

Change in Registration Fee (after first week) 5.00 

Deposit upon acceptance for admission (non-returnable) 50.00 

Graduation Fee (to be paid in February of the Fifth Year) 15.00 

Late Registration Fee 20.00 

Matriculation Fee (New Students) 15.00 

Special Examination Fee 5.00 

Professional Liability Insurance Fee 8.50 



* 



The university reserves the right to make such changes in fees and other changes as 
may be found necessary, although every effort will be made to keep the cost to the 
student as low as possible. 

* during P.E.P. and clinical experience 



11 



THE PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE PROGRAM 

The Professional Experience Program (PEP) of the University of Maryland School of 
Pharmacy is designed to prepare a student for the professional practice of pharmacy by 
means of a structured program of externship training, supervised by the School of 
Pharmacy and approved by the State Board of Pharmacy. The student-extern receives 
no pay for the time spent in practice but does receive academic credit and must fulfill 
specific education requirements during the Professional Experience Program (PEP). 

THE DOCTOR OF PHARMACY PROGRAM 

The Board of Regents of the University of Maryland and the Maryland Council on 
Higher Education have approved the Doctor of Pharmacy program proposed by the 
faculty of the School of Pharmacy. This six-year program is designed to complement 
and enhance, not replace, the baccalaureate program, and allows the student, as 
recommended by the American Council on Pharmaceutical Education and the 
American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, to receive the Pharm.D. as a first 
professional degree. 

A primary function of the graduate of this program will be to perform a clincial 
therapeutic service. This will include providing to other health professionals 
information on the therapeutic use of drugs, adverse drug reactions, drug interactions, 
and toxicity of drugs; recommending drugs of choice; counselling of patients with 
respect to drugs; and performing a consultative function in the areas of clinical signs 
and measurements relating to therapeutic response. The graduate will be capable of 
other roles including that of an educator in pharmacy and other health professions 
programs. 

Pharmacy students who will have completed the fourth year of a five-year program 
in an accredited school of pharmacy and individuals who have been awarded the 
B.S. or advanced degrees in pharmacy may apply for admission to the Doctor of 
Pharmacy program. 

Prior to admission to the program, each applicant should complete, or plan to 
complete a pre-pharmacy and professional program equivalent to the first four years 
of Maryland's B.S. in Pharmacy program. 

In general, a 3.0 average (B) in all courses in the professional program will be a 
minimum requirement. 

Personal interviews will be required of all qualified applicants and tests, letters of 
recommendation etc. required if deemed necessary by the Pharm.D. Admissions 
Committee. 

Persons interested in the Pharm.D. program can request additional information from 
the Dean's Office of the School of Pharmacy. 

GRADUATE PROGRAM 

The School of Pharmacy offers, through the Graduate School of the University of 
Maryland, a program leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees in medicinal chemistry, pharmacognosy, pharmacology and toxicology and 
pharmacy. There is also a Graduate Residency Program in Hospital Pharmacy leading to 
a Master of Science degree and a Certificate of Residency in Hospital Pharmacy. 

Students interested in more information concerning the graduate program are invited 
to request it from the school. 

STUDENT HEALTH 

The Baltimore Campus of the university maintains a Student Health Service for a fee of 



12 



$10.00 per annum, payable at registration in September. A student's wife or child, or 
other members of his family, are not eligible for health care service unless the wife, too, 
is a student and has paid the fee for herself. At the beginning of the entering year, each 
student will be given a physical examination. 

The Student Health Service facility is located on the first floor of Howard Hall (660 West 
Redwood Street), and is open from 8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. 
When the office is closed, students may report to the emergency room of 
the University of Maryland Hospital, if absolutely necessary. 

If this is a true emergency, the health service will pay the emergency room fee. 
Otherwise, the student will be billed. 

All students are required to carry Blue Cross hospitalization insurance or its equivalent. 
In addition, it is recommended that all students be covered by Blue Shield or its 
equivalent to cover physicians' and surgeons' fees. 

Additional information regarding the Student Health Service may be obtained in 
the Office of Administration of the School of Pharmacy. 

REGISTRATION AND LICENSURE 
REQUIREMENT OF THE MARYLAND 
BOARD OF PHARMACY 

Students enrolling in the School of Pharmacy shall, within 30 days, file with the 
Secretary of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy an application for registration as a 
student of pharmacy. The fee for this is one dollar. The students are required to submit 
sworn statements of all internship experiences to the board upon their request. The 
board recognizes the six-month professional experience program of the school as 
satisfying their internship requirements. 

Any person of good moral character who has attained the age of 21 years, who shall 
present satisfactory evidence to the Maryland Board of Pharmacy that he or she has had 
at least four years standard high school training or its equivalent, and is a graduate of a 
reputable school or college of pharmacy approved by said board and accredited by the 
American Council on Pharmaceutical Education and the board shall adopt the 
approved list as published on July 1 of each year, subject to amendment, and who after 
examination by the said board be by it deemed competent shall be registered as a 
pharmacist and be given a certificate of such registration, provided, however, that an 
internship program to be regualted by said board be served. Such persons shall make 
application to the secretary of said board, at least 10 days before any stated meeting of 
the board and shall pay to the said board fee of $40. 

For further information, please contact the secretary of the Maryland Board of 
Pharmacy, 201 West Preston Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

FINANCIAL AID 
SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 
Professional Program 
Baltimore Campus 

Each applicant to the school will receive a brochure explaining the various scholarships 
and loans available to students admitted to the program, along with financial aid 
applications. 

All requests for information concerning financial aid should be addressed to: Dr. C. T. 
Ichniowski, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 636 West Lombard Street, 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 



13 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

The regulations governing dismissal, promotion and probation are found in the 
Student Handbook published annually by the school. 

HOUSING 

Housing accommodations are available on the Baltimore campus, 621 West Lombard 
Street. For particulars write: 

Ms. Elaine Kacmarik, Manager 

The Baltimore Union 

621 West Lombard Street 

Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

ACADEMIC SESSIONS 

The school calendar operates on a three-term basis. The fall term is four months in 
length and is completed prior to the Christmas recess. The winter term is one month 
(January) in length. Its purpose is to allow students to avail themselves of tutorial 
services or elective courses on the professional or UMBC campuses of the university. 
The spring term, four months in length, begins during the first week in February. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 
B. S. PROGRAM 

The three-year professional program as offered on the Baltimore campus has been 
divided into two parts; the first two years of the program being a basic science 
sequence, and the final year primarily clinical in design. By dividing the program in this 
manner it is hoped that students, upon completion of the two-year basic science 
program, will make career option selections which will enable them to move into the 
clinical year to receive a B. S. in Pharmacy and fulfill requirements for licensure or 
move into a proposed Doctor of Pharmacy program. 

The clinical year consists of six months of professional experience or clincal clerkship 
(14 credits) plus 7 credits of required course work and 11 credits of professional 
electives. The required course work includes courses in therapeutics, pharmacy 
practice and clinical toxicology. The six months of professional experience are divided 
into three months of required time plus three months of elective time. The three- 
month required clerkship is divided equally between community pharmacy, 
institutional pharmacy and therapeutics and patient care. The final three months are 
elective in that area that the student desires to follow as a career. The community 
practice segment will be served in a community pharmacy under a preceptor who has 
faculty rank as a clinical instructor in the school. This pharmacist is selected by the 
school and his practice must achieve certain requirements to be accepted. The student 
follows a structured program in the preceptor's practice, and his performance is 
evaluated by both the preceptor and the school. The institutional practice centers 
around distributive functions in hospitals ranging from the University of Maryland 
Hospital and The Johns Hopkins Hospital to community hospitals throughout the state. 
The segment of therapeutics and patient care is hospital experience time in patient 
care areas. Students will be involved in developing drug histories of patients, 
overseeing drug administration to the patient, noting adverse drug reactions, going on 
rounds with medical staff, providing drug information to the physician and other 
specialized conference activities. This program is under the supervision of the clinical 
pharmacy service which has been established in the university hospital. Other patient 
care areas would involve the counseling of patients in the out-patient clinic, the dental 
clinic and other patient care facilities in Baltimore. Completion of the professional 
experience program will be accepted by the Maryland Board of Pharmacy as meeting 
the internship requirements necessary for licensure. 



14 



CURRICULUM 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY 

FIRST PROFESSIONAL YEAR 
Title and Number of Course 



FALL SESSION 



MCHM 331 
MCHM 431 
PCOL 331 
PHAR 331 
PHAR 333 



Quantitative Pharmaceutical Analysis 
Biochemistry I 
Anatomy and Physiology I 
Introduction to Pharmacy & Health Care 
Basic Pharmaceutics I 



WINTER SESSION 

No courses offered 

SPRING SESSION 





Hours/week 


Lee. 


Lab. 


Credit 


3 


3 


4 


3 


— 


3 


3 


3 


4 


1 


— 


1 


3 


3 


4 



16 



MCHM 432 
PCOG 332 
PCOL 332 
PHAR 334 
PADM 332 


Biochemistry II 

Pharmaceutical Microbiology I 
Anatomy and Physiology II 
Basic Pharmaceutics II 
Drug Marketing 


2 
2 
3 
3 
3 


3 
3 
3 
3 


3 
3 

4 
4 
3 

17 



SECOND PROFESSIONAL YEAR 
FALL SESSION 

PADM 340 Social Sciences in Pharmacy 
PCOG 343 Pharmaceutical Microbiology II 
PCOG 441 General Pharmacognosy I 

Principles of Drug Action I: 

MCHM 441 Chemistry of Medicinal Products 
PCOL 441 Pharmacodynamics I 
PHAR 441 Biopharmaceutics 



3 
4 

17 



WINTER SESSION 
Optional Elective: 

PCOG 440 Community & Environmental Health 8 



SPRING SESSION 

PCOG 442 General Pharmacognosy II 
PADM 342 Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence 
PHAR 344 Intro, to Drug Prod. & Dispensing 
PCLN 346 Pathophysiology 

Principles of Drug Action II: 

MCHM 442 Chemistry of Medicinal Products I 
PCOL 442 Pharmacodynamics II 



2 

3 

Var. 

3 



3 
Var. 



15 



Electives (Select one) 

PHAR 342 Applied Calculus 
PADM 344 Pharmacy Management 
(DEPT) 448 Special Projects 



THIRD PROFESSIONAL YEAR 



18 or 19 



SUMMER SESSION (June-August) 
Professional Experience (Clinical Clerkship) 

PHAR 360 Community Practice I 
PHAR 361 Institutional Practice I 



FALL SESSION 
Required Courses 

PCLN 461 Therapeutics 
PHAR 450 Pharmacy Practice 
PCOL 451 Clinical Toxicology 

Electives (Select one) 

PHAR 454 Institutional Pharmacy I 

PADM 351 Community Pharmacy Management 

(DEPT) 448 Special Projects 



Var. 2-3 



9 or 10 



Professional Experience (Clinical Clerkship) 

November-January (Select two courses in 3-month period) 

PCLN 362 Therapeutics and Patient Care I — — 4 

PHAR 368 Community Practice II — — 2 

PHAR 369 Institutional Practice II — — 2 

PCLN 378 Therapeutics and Patient Care II — — 2 

PHAR 363 Special Studies — — 2 

4 or 6 
Total Credits for Summer and Fall Session 17-19 

WINTER SESSION (January) 
Option Elective 

PCOG 440 Community and Environmental Health 8 — 2 

SPRING SESSION 

Elective (select minimum of nine credits) 

SECTION A (February-March) 

MCHM 449 Special Group Studies 
(Clinical Chemistry) 
Non-Prescription Drugs 
Drug Abuse Education 
Adv. Pharm. Form. & Compdg. 
Adv. Pharm. Form. & Compdg. Lab. 
Institutional Pharmacy II 
Pharmacy & Therapeutics Colloquim 
Community Pharmacy Management III 
Institutional Pharmacy Management 
Antibiotics 
Special Projects 



PHAR 


353 


PHAR 


358 


PHAR 


451 


PHAR 


452 


PHAR 


455 


PHAR 


460 


PADM 


352 


PADM 


452 


PCOG 


452 


(DEPT) 


448 



Var. 




1 


4 


— 


2 


Var. 


— 


1-3 


4 


— 


2 


— 


6 


1 


4 


— 


2 


2 


— 


1 


4 


— 


2 


6 


— 


3 


4 


— 


2 


— 


Var. 


1-3 



16 



PHAR 


352 


PHAR 


358 


PHAR 


449 


PHAR 


451 


PHAR 


452 


PHAR 


453 


PHAR 


456 


PHAR 


460 


PADM 


352 


PADM 


449 


PCOG 


452 


PCOG 


454 


(DEPT) 


448 



SECTION B (April-May) 

PHAR 351 Parapharmaceuticals 4—2 

History of Pharmacy 2 — 1 

Drug Abuse Education Var. 1-3 

Spec. Group Studies (Industrial Pharmacy) 2 

Adv. Pharm. Form. & Compdg. 4 — 2 

Adv. Pharm. Form. & Compdg. Lab. — 6 1 

Cosmetics & Dermatological Prep. 4 — 2 

Cosmetics & Dermatological Prep. Lab. — 6 1 

Pharmacy & Therapeutics Colliquim 2 — 1 

Community Pharmacy Management III 4 — 2 

Spec. Group Studies (Health Economics) 4 2 

Antibiotics 4 — 2 

Diagnostic & Clinical Microbiology 4 6 3 

Special Projects — Var. 1-3 

PHARMACOLOGY & TOXICOLOGY 
(PCOL) 

Staff: Khazan (Chairman); Buterbaugh, Hattan, Adir, Moreton, Oderda, Lesher 

PCOL 331, 332. Anatomy & Physiology I and II (4,4) Three lectures and one 
laboratory. Fall and spring terms. A comprehensive study of structural and functional 
relationships in the human body with special emphasis on aspects of disease processes 
and sites of drug action. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

PCOL 441, 442. Pharmacodynamics I and II (4,3) Three lectures and one laboratory, 
fall term; three lectures second semester. A comprehensive study of pharmacodynam- 
ics leading to the rational therapeutic application of drugs. 

PCOL 448. Special Projects (Var. 1-3) Independent investigations in the field of 
pharmacology, consisting of library and laboratory or field research, seminars and/or 
other assignments appropriate to the problem being investigated. 

PCOL 451. Clinical Toxicology (2) Fall term, four lectures/week for two months. 
Deals with the clinical classes of poisoning and includes pharmacological principles in 
treatment of acute poisoning, mechanism of toxic actions of drugs and household 
products and responsibilities of poison control officers. 

PCOL 452. Principles of Toxicology (3) Spring term, four lectures/week for two 
months, with conferences and laboratory projects equivalent to one laboratory. Deals 
with basic principles of investigative toxicology and includes toxic effects on organ, 
cell and enzyme systems, forensic toxicology and toxicity of classes of compounds. 

PHARMACY 
(PHAR) 

Staff: Shangraw (Chairman); Lamy, Allen, Augsburger, Crouthamel, Seidman, 
Edmondson, Fedder, Hollenbeck 

PHAR 331. Introduction to Pharmacy & Health Care (1) Third year, fall term, one 
lecture. An orientation program designed to acquaint students with the role of 
pharmacy together with the other members of the health professions in the delivery of 
health care services — past, present and future. 

PHAR 333, 334. Basic Pharmaceutics I and II (4,4) Third year, three lectures and one 
laboratory. A study of the basic technology involved in small and large scale 



17 



production of pharmaceutical dosage forms (first semester: solid and semi-solid 
dosage forms; second semester: solutions and liquid disperse systems). It is also 
designed to increase the understanding of physical-chemical principles involved in 
pharmaceutical systems and the application of such knowledge to the problems 
involved in drug formulation, preparation, distribution, stability and pharmaceologi- 
cal action. 

PHAR 344. Introduction to Drug Products and Dispensing (1) Spring term, lecture 
and laboratory (var.). A presentation of the important dosage forms of commercial 
drug products in each pharmacological classification including the procedures 
involved in the storage, dispensing, recordkeeping and the provision of relevant drug 
information. 

PHAR 351. Parapharmaceuticals (2) Spring term, four lectures/week for two 
months. A discussion of prescription accessories and related items to enable the 
pharmacist to act as consultant to members of the health care team and his patients. 
Emphasis will be placed on design, composition, proper use and contraindications. 

PHAR 352. History of Pharmacy (1) Spring term, two lectures/week for two months. 
A survey of the history of pharmacy with emphasis on those aspects more pertinent to 
the practice of pharmacy in the United States and Maryland. 

PHAR 353. Non-Prescription Drugs (2) A comprehensive course dealing with self- 
medication and over-the-counter drugs. Among the topics discussed are the socio- 
historical aspects of self-medication, the regulation of non-prescription drugs, the 
manufacture and distribution of OTC drugs, the advertising of OTC drugs and the 
therapeutic categories and pharmacology of OTC drugs. 

PHAR 358. Drug Abuse Education (1-3) Spring term. Practice and training in the 
dissemination of drug information, especially drug abuse information to the public. 

PHAR 360. Community Practice I (2) Summer. A required four-week professional 
experience program designed to acquaint the pharmacy student with basic concepts 
of institutional practice. 

PHAR 361. Institutional Practice I (2) Summer. A required four-week professional 
experience program designed to acquaint the pharmacy student with basic concepts 
of institutional practice. 

PHAR 363. Special Studies (2) By permission of pharmacy department. An elective 
four-week professional experience in a specialized health care service or related area. 

PHAR 368. Community Practice II (2-6) Two credits/four weeks. Advanced 
professional experience in community practice. 

PHAR 369. Institutional Practice II (2-6) Two credits/four weeks. Advanced 
professional experience in institutional practice. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

PHAR 441. Biopharmaceutics (3) Fall term. A Study of the physical, chemical and 
biological factors which influence drug action with an emphasis on the choice of 
dosage forms and formulation to optimize therapeutic effect. 

PHAR 450. Pharmacy Practice (2) Fall term, four lectures or discussions/week for 
two months. A presentation of the essential components of specialized areas of study 
as they apply to pharmacy practice, including an analysis of the health professions and 
the health care system, methods of drug distribution and control, radiophar- 
maceuticals, sterile dosage forms, parapharmaceuticals, non-prescription drugs, 
cosmetics, drug stability packaging and administration. 



18 



PHAR 451. Advanced Pharmaceutical Formulations & Compounding (2) Spring 
term, four lectures/week for two months. A study of the ingredients and techniques 
involved in the extemporaneous or small scale bulk compounding of pharmaceutical 
formulations utilized in community and hospital pharmacy. 

PHAR 452. Advanced Pharmaceutical Formulations & Compounding Laboratory 

(1) Spring term, laboratory. 

PHAR 453. Cosmetics and Dermatological Preparations (2) A presentation of the 
essential components of specialized areas of cosmetics and cosmetic-like preparations 
used in pharmacy. The course is designed to familiarize students with ingredients and 
processes involved in the formulation, manufacture and quality control of cosmetics. 
Lectures and topics on the fundamentals of cosmetic law and government regulations 
of importance to pharmacists. Field trips to the Noxell Corporation to acquaint the 
pharmacy student with the manufacturing operation on a commercial scale. 

PHAR 454. Institutional Pharmacy I (2) Fall term, four lectures/week for two 
months. Fundamentals of institutional pharmacy practice and administration with 
emphasis on hospital and nursing homes. Includes physical facilities, standards, 
purchasing, formulary, record keeping, drug distribution and control systems. 

PHAR 455. Institutional Pharmacy II (2) Spring term, four lectures/week for two 
months. A study of the administrative organization of health care institutions and 
interrelationship of various units with the pharmacy. Includes in-depth, individual 
study of one particular aspect of institutional pharmacy practice. 

PHAR 456. Cosmetics and Dermatological Preparations Laboratory (1) Spring term, 
laboratory. 

PHAR 460. Pharmacy and Therapeutics Colloquium (1) Spring term, two hours/ 
week for two months. Discussions of case studies from professional experience pro- 
gram and current developments in pharmacy. 

PHAR 462. Pharmacy and the Health Care System (2) Spring term, four lec- 
tures/week for two months. (Undergraduates with permission of the instructor). A 
course designed to familiarize pharmacists with the total health care environment; to 
introduce applicable, analytical and technical skills, such as systems analysis and 
computer science; to identify the various social, political, economic and professional 
pressures which are influencing developments in health care and to increase the 
pharmacist's appreciation of the changes affecting the health care system. 




19 



It 



COURSES OF 
INSTRUCTION 



MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY 
(MCHM) 

Staff: Zenker (Chairman); Krikorian, Leslie, Wright, Callery, Loberg, van der Hoeven 

MCHM 331. Quantitative Pharmaceutical Analysis (4) Fall term, three lectures, one 
laboratory. A study of the principles of quantitative analysis with special emphasis on 
techniques applicable to the separation and analysis of compounds and products of 
pharmaceutical interest. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

MCHM 431, 432. Biochemistry I and II (3,3) Fall term, three lectures; spring term, 
two lectures, one laboratory. Prerequisite: One year of organic chemistry. Physical and 
chemical properties of the components of living systems and of the metabolic 
processes in health and disease. 



MCHM 441, 442. Chemistry of Medicinal Products I and II (3,2) Fall term, three 
lectures; spring term, two lectures. Prequisite: One year organic chemistry. A survey of 
chemical properties, structure activity relationships, and metabolism of organic 
f medicinal products. 

MCHM 448. Special Projects (Var. 1-3) Independent investigations in the field of 
medicinal chemistry, consisting of library and laboratory or field research, seminars 
' and/other assignments appropriate to the problem being investigated. 



CLINICAL PHARMACY 

(PCLN) 

Staff: Kerr (Chairman); Roffman, Michocki, Hoopes, Oksas, Tobias, Wiser, Ireland, 
Majerus 

PCLN 346: Pathophysiology (3) Spring term, three lectures. This course will enable 
students, by generally considering broad concepts of diseased physiologic processes, 
to relate them to specific disease states and to the rationale for therapeutic correction. 
Emphasis at all times will be on disease processes rather than on the specifics of a given 
disease state. 

PCLN 461: Therapeutics (3) Fall term, six hours/week for two months. A course 
designed to present basic prinaiple of rational drug therapy within the context of 
various pathophysiologic processes which the student has already learned. Concur- 
rently, salient points in the evaluation of therapeutic literature will be discussed. 

PCLN 362: Therapeutics & Patient Care I — (4) A required four-week professional 
experience program designed to acquaint the pharmacy student with disease states 
and related therapeutics by involvement in hospital patient care. 

PCLN 378: Therapeutics & Patient Care II (2-6) Two credits/four weeks. Advanced 
professional experience in therapeutics. 



PHARMACOGNOSY 
(PCOG) 

Staff: Blomster (Chairman), Rosier, Skarbek, M. Speedie 



20 



PCOC 332. Pharmaceutical Microbiology I (3) Spring term, two lectures and one 
laboratory. Prerequisites: Organic chemistry and MCHM 431. This course is designed 
specifically for pharmacy students and includes introductory studies on the practical 
and theoretical considerations of bacteria, molds, yeasts, viruses and rickettsiae, 
sterilization, immunity, epidemiology and disease production. 

PCOC 343. Pharmaceutical Microbiology II (2) Fall term, two lectures. Prerequi- 
site: Pharmacognosy 332. A study of the transmission, treatment, diagnosis, prevention 
and etiological agent of diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria, viruses, molds, yeasts 
and rickettsiae. Part of the course is devoted to the study of medical parasitology, 
pathology and parasitic infections. 

PCOC 440. Community & Environmental Health (2) Eight lectures/week/one 
month term; winter term. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. A study of the 
public health facilities in the community; their relationship to the practices of the 
allied health sciences and their impact on health care and the disease state as well as the 
role of ecosystems in the health care package. The application of statistical and 
epidemiological methods to health problems will be illustrated through lectures and 
demonstrations. 

PCOC 441. Pharmacognosy, General I (3) Fall term, three lectures. Prerequisites: 
Organic chemistry, MCHM 431, 432. A study of drugs from natural sources with 
emphasis on the therapeutic, chemical and physiaal properties of purified phytocon- 
stituents and discussion of their economic and sociological importance and practical 
application in pharmacy. Nomenclature, history, source, extraction, identification and 
biosynthesis of carbohydrates, glycosides, tannins, volatile oils, lipids and enzymes are 
considered. 

PCOG 442. Pharmacognosy, General II (3) Spring term, two lectures and one 
laboratory. A continuation of Pharmacognosy 441, to include alkaloids, resins, 
hallucinogenic plants, harmful plants and certain aspects of allergy and allergenic 
plants. An intensive study of antibiotics and immunizing biological discussion of their 
utilization and relationship to appropriate infections and pathological diseases is 
presented. 




21 



f 



I 



PCOC 448. Special Projects (Var. 1-3) Independent investigations in the field of 
pharmacognosy, consisting of library and laboratory or field research, seminars and/or 
other assignments appropriate to the problem being investigated. 

PCOC 452. Antibiotics (2) Four lectures/week/two months, spring term. Prerequi- 
site: Permission of the instructor. The study of antibiotic substances, history, methods 
of detection, production, biosynthesis, mechanism of action, extraction and assay 
together with the chemical, pharmaceutical and chemotherapeutic properties of these 
compounds. 

PCOG 454. Diagnostic and Clinical Microbiology (3) Four lectures and two two- 
hour laboratory periods/week for two months, springterm. Prerequisites: Pharmacog- 
nosy 442 or special permission of the instructor. Theory and techniques involved in 
clinical and diagnostic applied microbiology, particularly in routine serology, 
diagnostic microbiology, immunoelectrophoresis, with quality control of parenteral 
solutions and other pharmaceutical preparations with emphasis on sterility methods in 
the unidose concept. 



» PHARMACY ADMINISTRATION 

- (PADM) 

* Staff: Knapp (Chairman); Leavitt, Palumbo, Fader, Kaufman 

PADM 332. Drug Marketing (3) Spring term, three lectures. A study of the 
pharmaceutical industry and the distribution of drug products and pharmaceutical 
services. Special emphasis is placed on the patient and on the institutions involved in 
supplying health care to the patient. 

PADM 340. Social Sciences in Pharmacy (2) Fall term, two lectures. A study of the 
application of the principles of the social sciences to patient care and health care 
systems. 

PADM 342. Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence (3) Spring term, three lectures. Funda- 
mentals of law of importance to pharmacists; federal and state laws and regulations 
pertaining to the sale of drugs, narcotics, poison and pharmaceutical preparations. 

PADM 344. Pharmacy Mangement I (3) Spring term, three lectures. A study of the 
generation and utilization of accounting information in the management of a 
community or institutional practice. 

PADM 351, 352. Community Pharmacy Mangement II, III (2,2) Fall and spring terms, 
four lectures/week for two months. Prerequisite: PADM 344. A study of the 
management problems of community pharmacy, including organization, staffing, 
directing, planning and control. 

PADM 448. Special Projects (Var. 1-3) Independent investigations in the field of 
pharmacy administration, consisting of library and laboratory or field research, 
seminars, and/or other assignments appropriate to the problem being investigated. 

PADM 452. Institutional Pharmacy Management (3) Spring term, six lectures/ week 
for two months. A study of the application of management principles to the 
institutional environment with emphasison the managementsystemsapplicabletothe 
hospital and extended care facility pharmacy. 

NON-DEPARTMENTAL COURSES 

PHAR 342. Applied Calculus (4) Spring term, four lectures. An introduction to 
elements of differential and integral calculus as preparation for elementary physical 
chemistry and the pharmaceutical sciences. 



22 



EMPLOYMENT PROSPECTUS 

Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy Graduates 

Nationally, it is felt that the supply of professionally educated pharmacists is at, or very 
near, the level required to effectively serve the current demand for traditional 
pharmaceutical services. 

The current rapid rise in college of pharmacy enrollments has led to considerable 
concern within academia and the profession. An analysis of a recent manpower study 
(1975) done by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy indicated that only 
0.3 per cent of 102,218 pharmacists were classified as unexplained unemployed. Even in 
the small group, disability may contribute to their unemployed status. 

In Maryland, a 1976 survey of graduates revealed that of the approximately 645 replies, 
none reported that they were unemployed. Other information of importance to an 
applicant considering pharmacy are reported in Tables I and II. 

Table I — Income Information 

Graduates of the School of Pharmacy by Age Group 



Income 

Less than $10,000 
10,000 - 14,999 
15,000 - 19,999 
20,000 - 24,999 
25,000 - 29,999 
30,000 or more 

100% 100% 

Table II — Type of Practice 

Graduates of the School of Pharmacy 



(N = 102) 




(N = 637) 


20-29 Age Group 


All 


Age Groups 


12% 




7% 


5 




5 


50 




27 


28 




33 


4 




14 


1 




14 





(N = 102) 

20-29 

Age Group 


(N = 644) 
All Age 
Groups 


Community 

Pharmacy — Independent 


28% 


38% 


Community 
Pharmacy - Chain 


22 


24 


Hospital 
Pharmacy 


37 


17 


Clinical 
Pharmacy 


1 


1 


Other 


12 


15 


Combination of above 




5 



100% 100% 

The files of the school's placement service, as of January 1, 1977, indicate that a number 
of jobs are still available; 14 full-time community and hospital jobs and 9 part-time 
positions remain unfilled. An impression of the job market is that jobs are available but 
graduates may have to take second or third choice positions more often than in past 
years. 



23 



FACULTY 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY PROGRAM 

PROFESSORS 

William J. Kinnard, Jr., Ph.D., (1957), Purdue University, Dean and Professor of 

Pharmacology 
Dean E. Leavitt, Ph.D., (1968), Purdue University, Associate Dean for Administration 

and Professor of Pharmacy Administration 
C. T. Ichniowski, Ph.D., (1936), University of Maryland, Director of Student Financial 

Aid and Emerson Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology 
Ralph N. Blomster, Ph.D., (1963), University of Connecticut, Professor of Pharmacog- 
nosy and Department Chairman 
Nairn Khazan, Ph.D., (1960), Hebrew University, Israel, Professor of Pharmacology and 
a Toxicology and Department Chairman 

David A. Knapp, Ph.D., (1965), Purdue University, Professor of Pharmacy Administra- 
i tion and Department Chariman 

J! Peter P. Lamy, Ph.D., (1964), Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, Professor of Pharmacy 

^ Ralph F. Shangraw, Ph.D., (1959), University of Michigan, Professor of Pharmacy and 

§. Department Chairman 

Nicolas Zenker, Ph.D., (1958), University of California, Professor of Medicinal 
Chemistry and Department Chairman 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 



Joseph S. Adir, Ph.D., (1972), State University of New York, Associate Professor of 

Pharmacology and Toxicology 
[;t Benjamin F. Allen, Ph.D., (1949), University of Maryland, Associate Professor of 

Pharmacy 
Larry L. Augsburger, Ph.D., (1967), University of Maryland, Associate Professor of 

Pharmacy 
Gary G. Buterbaugh, Ph.D., (1969), University of Iowa, Associate Professor of 

Pharmacology and Toxicology 
» William G. Crouthamel, Ph.D., (1970), University of Kentucky, Associate Professor of 

* Pharmacy 

Robert A. Kerr, Pharm.D., (1970), University of California, San Francisco, Associate 

Professor and Chairman, Division of Clinical Pharmacy 
S. Edward Krikorian, Ph.D., (1967), Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Associate 

Professor of Medicinal Chemistry 
James Leslie, Ph.D., (1959), Queens University, Belfast, Ireland, Associate Professor of 

Medicinal Chemistry 
Michael D. Loberg, Ph.D., (1973), Washington University, Associate Professor of 

Medicinal Chemistry 
Karl-Heinz A. Rosier, Ph.D., (1960), University of Munich, Germany, Associate 

Professor of Pharmacognosy 
Jeremy Wright, Ph.D., (1965), University of London (England), Associate Professor of 

Pharmacognosy 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Patrick S. Callery, Ph.D., (1973), University of California, San Francisco, Assistant 

Professor of Medicinal Chemistry 
David G. Hattan, Ph.D., (1973), Ohio State University, Assistant Professor of 

Pharmacology and Toxicology 
R. Gary Hollenbeck, Ph.D., (1977), Purdue University, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 



24 



John M. Hoopes, Pharm.D. (1973), Duquesne University, Assistant Professor of Clinical 

Pharmacy 
Gary A. Lesher, Ph.D., (1977), Purdue University, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology & 

Toxicology 
Robert J. Michocki, M.S. (1974), University of Maryland, Assistant Professor of Clinical 

Pharmacy 
J. Edward Moreton, Ph.D., (1971), University of Mississippi, Assistant Professor of 

Pharmacology and Toxicology 
Gary M. Oderda, Pharm.D., (1972), University of California, Assistant Professor of 

Clinical Pharmacy and Director, Maryland Poison Information Center 
Richard M. Oksas, Pharm.D., (1970), University of Southern California, Assistant 

Professor of Clinical Pharmacy 
Francis B. Palumbo, Ph.D., (1974), University of Mississippi, Assistant Professor of 

Pharmacy Administration 
David S. Roffman, M.S., (1973), University of Maryland, Assistant Professor of Clinical 

Pharmacy 
Henry G. Seidman, Ph.G., (1930), University of Maryland, Assistant Professor of 

Pharmacy and Director of Continuing Education 
Jerry D. Skarbek, Ph.D., (1974), University of Washington, Assistant Professor of 

Pharmacognosy 
Marilyn K. Speedie, Ph.D. (1973), Purdue University, Assistant Professor of Pharmacog- 
nosy 
Stuart M. Speedie, Ph.D. (1973), Purdue University, Assistant Professor of Pharmacog- 
nosy 
Stuart M. Speedie, Ph.D., (1973), Purdue University, Assistant Professor and Director, 

Office of Educational Development 
Dianne E. Tobias, Pharm.D., (1971), University of California, Assistant Professor of 

Clinical Pharmacy 
Theodore van der Hoeven, Ph.D., (1971), Columbia University, Assistant Professor of 

Medicinal Chemistry 
Thomas H. Wiser, Pharm.D., (1973), University of Minnesota, Assistant Professor of 

Clinical Pharmacy 

INSTRUCTORS 

William H. Edmondson, M.Ed., (1975), University of Southern California, Director, 

Professional Experience Programs 
Donald O. Fedder, B.S., (1950), University of Maryland, Director of Community 

Pharmacy Programs 
Gordon A. Ireland, Pharm.D., (1976), University of Minnesota, Instructor in Clinical 

Pharmacy 
Thomas C. Majerus, Pharm.D., (1976), University of Minnesota, Instructor in Clinical 

Pharmacy 
M. Antoinette Schiesler, M.S., (1968), University of Tennessee, Director, Minority 

Affairs 
Anthony C. Tommasello, B.S. (1973), University of Maryland, Instructor in Drug Abuse 

Education 

LECTURERS 

Paul T. Cuzmanes, B.S., (1970), University of Maryland 
John F. Fader, II, B.S., (1963), University of Maryland 
Joseph S. Kaufman, LL.B., (1950), University of Maryland 

OTHER 

Bertha O. Hamilton, M.Ed., (1976), Howard University, Minority Student Recruiter 



25 



PHARM.D. AND GRADUATE 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



ii 



Jilt 



I: 



The University of Maryland seeks to provide equal educational opportunities without 
regard to race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, or handicap. This policy 
extends to employment, admission, and all programs and activities supported by the 
university. 

The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract 
between the student and the University of Maryland. Changes are effected from time 
to time in the general regulations and in the academic requirements. There are 
established procedures for making changes, procedures which protect the institu- 
tion's integrity and the individual student's interest and welfare. When the actions of a 
student are judged by competent authority, using established procedure, to be 
detrimental to the interests of the university community, that person may be required 
to withdraw from the university. 




26 



GOALS AND 

COMPETENCY 

OBJECTIVES 



DOCTOR OF PHARMACY 
PROGRAM INTRODUCTION 

The Board of Regents of the University of Maryland and the Maryland Council on 
Higher Education have approved the Doctor of Pharmacy program proposed by the 
faculty of the School of Pharmacy. This six-year program is designed to complement 
and enhance, not replace, the baccalaureate program and allows the student as 
recommended by the American Council on Pharmaceutical Education and the 
American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy to receive the Pharm.D. as a first 
professional degree. 



GOAL 

To provide advanced education and training in necessary scientific and clinical 
knowledges, assured comprehension, skills, and attitudes which will enable graduates 
to optimally function as a therapeutic consultant, a direct provider of health care in 
situations requiring active monitoring of therapeutic and toxic drug effects, a patient 
educator and a health professional educator in the clinical use of therapeutic agents. 



COMPETENCY OBJECTIVES 

The Doctor of Pharmacy graduate will be able to: 

(1) define and assess patients' therapeutic problems utilizing selective clinical data, 
including patient history and physical assessment skills; 

(2) define achievable therapeutic objectives and identify and monitor discriminat- 
ing subjective and objective points of therapy; 

(3) identify appropriate drug variables and appropriate patient variables and 
integrate these variables into optimal therapeutic regimen design; 

(4) identify toxic end points of drug use and actively monitor these end points to 
prevent development of predictable toxic responses; 

(5) detect, assess and appropriately manage adverse drug reactions; 

(6) identify, assess and provide information in the management of toxic ingestion 
and play an active role in poison prevention; 

(7) assume primary responsibility in ambulatory chronic disease management and 
primary health care; 

(8) conduct implicit and explicit therapeutic audits in areas of both ambulatory and 
inpatient care; 

(9) function as a clinical health professional educator with ability to define specific 
educational objectives, utilize educational methodologies and utilize approp- 
riate student evaluation techniques; 

(10) identify patient education needs and develop and implement patient 
education plans; 

(11) retrieve, evaluate and interpret appropriate scientific and clinical literature to 
provide clinically relevant drug information. 



27 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 



I 

% 

tft> 

b 

Ki 

ii>t 

Mf 
► > 

If 

it 



Pharmacy students who will have completed the fourth year of a five-year program in 
an accredited school of pharmacy and individuals who have been awarded the B.S. or 
advanced degrees in pharmacy may apply to the Doctor of Pharmacy program. 

Prior to admission, each applicant should complete or plan to complete a pre- 
pharmacy and professional program equivalent to the first four years of the University 
of Maryland B.S. in Pharmacy program, including courses in pathophysiology and 
calculus. 

In general, a 3.0 average (B) in all courses in the professional program will be a 
minimum requirement. 

Personal interviews will be required of all qualified applicants. Other methods of 
applicant evaluation (such as tests and letters of recommendation) will be applied 
equally to all applicants when such methods are deemed necessary by the Admissions 
Committee. 

Class size is currently limited to six students, no more than two of which will be 
from outside the State of Maryland. 




28 



CURRICULUM 

(1) Academic: Academic coursework includes: therapeutics, clinical toxicology, 
advanced biopharmaceutics, and statistical methods in clinical investigation. 
Seminar courses are generally interdisciplinary with input from both basic 
science and clinical faculty. Seminar courses include drug action, clinical 
pharmacokinetics, health education, clinical therapeutics, teaching methods, 
advanced pharmaceutics and advanced nuclear science. 

(2) Pharmacy Practice: Students take professional experience rotations in 
community pharmacy practice and institutional pharmacy practice which 
meets the Maryland State Board of Pharmacy requirements for experience prior 
to licensure. 

(3) Clinical Education and Training: The Pharm.D. program places considerable 
emphasis on clinical education and training. Physical assessment skills are 
attained through the School of Medicine's course in physical diagnosis (taken in 
conjunction with second-year medical students). Clinical experiences begin in 
the first semester and continue throughout the two-year curriculum. Clinical 
Clerkship I is an introductory experience (160 hours over four weeks) in adult 
inpatient medicine. Clinical Clerkship II spans a total of five months (800 hours) 
and includes two months of adult inpatient medicine, two months of 
ambulatory care (primary care, family health, and chronic disease manage- 
ment) and one month in poison information. Clinical Clerkship III spans four 
months (640 hours) in which the student can select one-month specialty 
rotations from among cardiology, infectious diseases, endocrinology, oncol- 
ogy, neurology, pediatrics, etc. Students can elect two additional clinical 
experience or special project months. Supervision of students occurs in a 
"graded" fashion in each of the three levels of clerkships and includes (a) in- 
process review, (b) end-of-task review and (c) end-of-day audit. 

DOCTOR OF PHARMACY PROGRAM 

FIRST AND SECOND PROFESSIONAL YEARS 

The first two professional years of the curriculum are the same for both the doctoral 
and baccalaureate programs, except for one course. Those students that expect to 
apply for the doctoral program must elect PHAR 342: Applied Calculus, in the spring 
session of the second professional year. 

THIRD PROFESSIONAL YEAR 

SUMMER SESSION (June-August) Credits 

PHAR 360 Community Practice 2 

PHAR 361 Institutional Practice I 2 



FALL SESSION 

PCLN 461 Therapeutics (Sept.-Oct.) 3 

PCOL 451 Clinical Toxicology (Sept.-Oct.) 2 

PHAR 502 Advanced Biopharmaceutics 2 

PDIA 520 Physical Diagnosis 1 

PCOL 470 Drug Action Conference I 2 

PCLN 570 Clinical Clerkship I (Nov.) 4 

PCLN 578 Clinical Clerkship II (Dec.) _3 

Total Credits 17 



29 



WINTER SESSION (January) 

PCLN 578 Clinical Clerkship II 

PCLN 462 Statistics in Clinical Investigation 

Total Credits 



SPRING SESSION 

PDIA 520 Physical Diagnosis 

PCOL 471 Drug Action Conference II 

PADM470 Health Education Seminar 

PCLN 578 Clinical Clerkship II 

PCLN 579 Clinical Clerkship III 

PHAR 475 Clinical Pharmacokinetics Seminar 

Total Credits 
Total Third Professional Year Credits 



43 



FOURTH PROFESSIONAL YEAR 

SUMMER SESSION (June-August) 

PCLN 579 Clinical Clerkship III 
Elective 

Total Credits 



Credits 

6 

_2 

8 



FALL SESSION 

PCLN 580 
PCLN 582 
PCLN 579 
PHAR 569 
Elective 



Clinical Therapeutics Seminar I 
Clinical Teaching Seminar I 
Clinical Clerkship III 
Institutional Practice II2 

Total Credits 



1 
1 
9 

2-3 
15-16 



WINTER SESSION (January) 

PCLN 579 Clinical Clerkship III 

Total Credits 



SPRING SESSION 

PCLN 581 Clinical Therapeutics Seminar II 

PCLN 583 Clinical Teaching Seminar II 

PHAR 472B Advanced Nuclear Science (Clinical) 

PHAR 485 Advanced Pharmaceutics 

PCLN 579 Clinical Clerkship III 

Electives 

Total Credits 



1 
1 
1 
2 
9 

2-3 

16-17 



Total credits for Fourth Professional Year 43 

Minimum number of credits to complete Doctor of Pharmacy program 153 

Electives may be selected from those courses offered as electives in the final 
professional year of the B.S. in Pharmacy program and will be selected by the 
students in consultation with their advisement and counselling committees. 



30 



FACULTY 

PHARM.D. PROGRAM 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 

Robert A. Kerr, Pharm.D., (1970), University of California, San Francisco, Associate 
Professor and Chairman, Division of Clinical Pharmacy 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

John M. Hoopes, Pharm.D., (1973), Duquesne University, Assistant Professor of 

Clinical Pharmacy 
Robert J. Michocki, M.S., (1974), University of Maryland, Assistant Professor of 

Clinical Pharmacy 
Gary M. Oderda, Pharm.D., (1972), University of California, Assistant Professor of 

Clinical Pharmacy and Director, Maryland Poison Information Center 
Richard M. Oksas, Pharm.D., (1970), University of Southern California, Assistant 

Professor of Clinical Pharmacy 
David S. Roffman, M.S., (1973), University of Maryland, Assistant Professor of Clinical 

Pharmacy 
Dianne E. Tobias, Pharm.D., (1971), University of California, Assistant Professor of 

Clinical Pharmacy 
Thomas H. Wiser, Pharm.D., (1973), University of Minnesota, Assistant Professor of 

Clinical Pharmacy 

INSTRUCTORS 

Gordon A. Ireland, Pharm.D., (1976), University of Minnesota 
Thomas C. Majerus, Pharm.D., (1976), University of Minnesota 




31 






COURSES OF 
INSTRUCTION 



DOCTOR OF PHARMACY PROGRAM 

PCLN 448: SPECIAL PROJECTS (var. 1-3) Independent investigations in the field of 
clinical pharmacy, consisting of library and laboratory or field research, seminars 
and/or other assignments appropriate to the problem being investigated. 

PCLN 461 : THERAPEUTICS (3) Fall term, six hours/week for two months. A course 
designed to present basic principles of rational drug therapy within the context of 
various pathophysiologic processes which the student has already learned. 
Concurrently, salient points in the evaluation of therapeutic literature will be 
discussed. 

PCLN 462: STATISTICS IN CLINICAL INVESTIGATION (1) Winter term, four 
hours/week. The course is designed to introduce the student to the elements of 
j statistics and demonstrate their application to study design with the aim of 

p improving the student's ability to evaluate clinical literature. 

PCLN 570: CLINICAL CLERKSHIP I (4) Fall term. A four-week professional 
experience program designed to acquaint the pharmacy student with disease states 
and related therapeutics by involvement in hospital patient care. 

PCLN 578: CLINICAL CLERKSHIP II (3 credits/month) Students will work closely 

{["? with the clinical pharmacy staff in the areas where clinical services exist and would 

S be given some direct responsibility in patient-care services and in directing 

undergraduate students in their basic clerkships. Emphasis in these experiences 

would be placed on solving specific therapeutic problems, gaining clinical 

experience in the practical problems encountered in therapeutics and gaining 

fc. experience in providing drug information. 

PCLN 579: CLINICAL CLERKSHIP III (3 credits/month) Clerkships for advanced 
students designed to improve the depth of their clinical skills and to allow for initial 
selection of areas of specialty. 

PCLN 580,581: CLINICAL THERAPEUTICS SEMINAR I, II (1,1) One session per 
week. A seminar designed to provide the student with experience in analyzing 
specific patient therapeutic problems through formal patient presentation and 
analysis seminars conducted by members of the clinical pharmacy division and 
medical personnel. 

PCLN 582,583: CLINICAL TEACHING SEMINAR I, II (1,1) One session per week. A 
seminar course designed to analyze the various clinical teaching techniques and their 
application. Discussion will center on the application of the problem oriented 
medical record to clinical teaching, the problem oriented educational audit, 
problems encountered in clinical teaching, methods of orienting students to the 
clinical environment and a discussion of group dynamics in relation to communica- 
tion skills and interpersonal relationships. 

PHARMACY 
(PHAR) 

PHAR 360: COMMUNITY PRACTICE I (2) Summer. A required four-week 
professional experience program designed to acquaint the pharmacy student with 
basic concepts of community practice. 



32 






PHAR 361: INSTITUTIONAL PRACTICE I (2) Summer. A required four-week 
professional experience program designed to acquaint the pharmacy student with 
basic concepts of institutional practice. 

PHAR 472B: ADVANCED NUCLEAR SCIENCE (Clincial) (1) One session per week. A 
study in the use of radiopharmaceuticals in clinical service or research. Dis-cussions 
will be centered around radiation biology. 

PHAR 475: CLINICAL PHARMACOKINETICS SEMINAR (1) One session per week. 
This seminar course is to provide students with a knowledge of the application of 
pharmacokinetic principles to clinical situations. Students will learn to kinetically 
analyze specific patients with an emphasis on how pathophysiologic processes and 
drugs influence the kinetics of therapeutic agents. 

PHAR 485: ADVANCED PHARMACEUTICS (2) Two lectures per week. A study of 
specialized formulations and dosage forms. Topics include: drug stability, drug 
packaging and devices, sterile dosage forms, radiopharmaceuticals, etc. 

PHAR 502: ADVANCED BIOPHARMACEUTICS (2) A clinically oriented in-depth 
study of the factors affecting the time-course of drugs with emphasis on the 
implication and qualification of these factors in the disease state. 

PHAR 569: INSTITUTIONAL PRACTICE II (2) Summer. A clerkship to acquaint the 
student with the operation of the various functional units of a hospital pharmacy, 
including I.V. admixture, drug information, central and decentralized pharmacy 
services, etc. 




33 



% 



3 



I 



PHARMACOLOGY-TOXICOLOGY 
(PCOL) 

PCOL 451: CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY (2) Fall term, four lectures/week for two 
months. Deals with the clinical classes of poisoning and includes pharmacological 
principles in treatment of acute poisoning, mechanism of toxic actions of drugs and 
household products and responsibilities of poison control officers. 

PCOL 470,471 : DRUG ACTION CONFERENCE I, II (1,1) One session per week. The 
course will be presented in each semester and will have a topic schedule which repeats 
itself every two years. The course is an interdisciplinary seminar designed to present a 
wide variety of fundamental and applied aspects of the effect of drugs on the biological 
systems at a level of sophistication commensurate with that of the Pharm.D. student. 
The primary objective is to improve the student's ability when observing an altered 
therapeutic response or when attempting to predict an alteration in advance, to utilize 
his basic science knowledge in thinking about the following determinants of drug 
activity: dosage form and route of administration, dose and dose regimen, absorption, 
distribution, metabolism, excretion, receptor-drug interactions, drug-drug interac- 
tions, interactions with other substances, effects of disease and miscellaneous patient 
and drug variables. 

PHARMACY ADMINISTRATION 
(PADM) 

PADM 470: HEALTH EDUCATION SEMINAR (2) Two sessions per week. The 
objective of this course is to provide the student with the knowledge needed to be an 
effective health educator to the patient and a therapeutic consultant to other health 
professionals. A partial listing of the knowledge base to be conveyed in the course 
includes: attitudes, beliefs, and actions influencing health decisions, determinants of 
change in health-related behavior; interview skills for professional and patient 
communication; diagnosis of social, physical and behavioral potentials for carrying 
out personal health measures; educational diagnosis of methods to aid patient 
therapy; selection of appropriate health education measures. 

OTHER COURSES 

PDIA 520: INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL MEDICINE (2) Fall and spring. The 
course is designed to give the student instruction in the techniques of elaborating the 
clinical history and in performing the physical examination. An integrated lecture 
series is given by various members of the clinical medicine and pharmacy faculty. 
Moves from the examination of normal individuals to that of hospitalized patients. 




34 



FEES 
AND EXPENSES 



Pharm.D. and Graduate Programs 
1976-77 Academic Year 

Per 
Pharm.D. Semester 

Tuition — In-State $ 375.00 

Out-of-State 1090.00 

Tuition — Part-time undergraduate per credit (8 crs. or less) 34.00 

Graduate 

Tuition — Per Credit: 

In-State 50.00 

Out-of-State 85.00 

Application Fee 15.00 

Instructional Resources Fee (Full-time) 15.00 

Instructional Resources Fee (Part-time) 7.50 

Supporting Facilities Fee (Full-time) 30.00 

Supporting Facilities Fee (Part-time) 6.00 

Student Activities Fee (Full and Part-time) 10.00 

Student Health Fee (Full-time) 5.00 

Student Health Fee (Part-time) 2.00 

Health Insurance (Blue Cross)* 

One Person 65.88 

Two Persons 135.06 

Family 177.54 

Clinical Clerkship Fee (Pharm.D. only) 50.00 

Change in Program Fee 5.00 

Graduation Fee: 

Master of Science 15.00 

Doctor of Philosophy 60.00 

Pharm.D 15.00 

Late Registration Fee 20.00 

Professional Liability Insurance Fee (Pharm.D. only) 8.50 

Continuous Registration Fee 10.00 

The university reserves the right to make such changes in fees and other changes as 
may be found necessary, although every effort will be made to keep the cost to the 
student as low as possible. 

EXPLANATION OF FEES 

Application Fee partially defrays the cost of processing applications for admission 
and enrollment data. It is not refundable under any circumstances. If the student is 
accepted, this fee also satisfies the matriculation fee requirement. 

* Student Health Care Program. Health insurance is required of all full-time 
professional school students, (nine or more semester hours) in addition to the 
Student Health Fee. Students with equivalent insurance coverage must provide proof 
of such membership to his dean at the time of registration and obtain a hospital 
insurance waiver. Blue Cross and Blue Shield or other acceptable medical insurance 
is optional for graduate students. 



35 



t 



Tuition or Fixed Charges Fee is charged to students and is applied to the costs of 
providing the instructional programs of the University of Maryland at Baltimore. 

Supporting Facilities Fee is used for expansion of various facilities on campus that 
are not funded or are funded only in part from other sources. 

Student Activities Fee is collected by the university from all graduate students 
and will be used to support the Graduate Student Association and its activities. 

Continuous Registration Fee is applicable to doctoral condidates only. A more 
detailed explanation of this fee can be found on page 15. 

Student Health Fee is charged to help defray the cost of providing a Student 
Health Service. This service includes routine examinations and emergency care. Blue 
Cross and Blue Shield or other acceptable medical insurance is optional. 

Late Registration Fee is charged to defray the cost of the special handling of 
records involved for those who do not complete their registration on the prescribed 
days. 



Change in Program Fee is charged to defray the cost of the special handling of 
fa records for those who change their program after a designated date announced by 

£» the registrar's office. 

& DETERMINATION OF IN-STATE STATUS FOR ADMISSION, TUITION 

t AND CHARGE DIFFERENTIAL PURPOSES* 

»' An initial determination of in-state status for admission, tuition and charge 

differential purposes will be made by the university at the time a student's application 
%!i for admission is under consideration. The determination made at that time, and any 

b» determination made thereafter, shall previal in each semester until the determination 

is successfully challenged prior to the last day available for registration for the 
£ forthcoming semester. A determination regarding in-state status may be changed for 

zi any subsequent semester if circumstances, as later defined, warrant redetermination. 

g GENERAL POLICY 

l_, 1. It is the policy of the University of Maryland to grant in-state status for admission, 

^ tuition and charge differential purposes to United States citizens and to immigrant 

aliens lawfully admitted for permanent residence in accordance with the lawsof the 
8» United States, in the following cases: 

a. Where a student is financially dependent upon a parent, parents, or spouse 
domiciled in Maryland for at least six months prior to the last day available for 
registration for the forthcoming semester. 

b. Where a student is financially independent for at least the preceding 12 
months, and provided the student has maintained his domicile in Maryland for 
at least six consecutive months immediately prior to the last day available for 
registration for the forthcoming semester. 

c. Where a student is a spouse or a dependent child of a full-time employee of the 
university. 

d. Where a student who is a member of the Armed Forces of the United States is 
stationed on active duty in Maryland for at least six consecutive months 
immediately prior to the last day available for registration for the forthcoming 
semester, unless such student has been assigned for educational purposes to 
attend the University of Maryland. 

e. Where a student is a full-time employee of the University of Maryland. 

* A complete statement of this policy is available from the Office of Admissions, 
Room 132, Howard Hall, 660 West Redwood Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 



36 



2. It is the policy of the University of Maryland to attribute out-of-state status for 
admission, tuition and charge differential purposes in all other cases. 

3. Each campus of the university will be responsible for making the in-state 
determination for the prospective or enrolled student. 

4. In-state status is lost at any time a financially independent student established a 
domicile outside the State of Maryland. If the parent(s) or other persons through 
whom the student has attained in-state status establishes a domicile in another 
state, the student shall be assessed out-of-state tuition and charges six months after 
the out-of-state move occurs. 

APPEALS 

A student or applicant who disagrees with his classification may request a personal 
interview with the Director of Admissions and Registrations or his designee at which 
time the student will have an opportunity to present any and all evidence he may 
have bearing on his classification and to answer any questions which have been 
raised about his status. 

If the decision is adverse to him, a student may further file a written appeal to the 
Office of the President of the university. The decision of the president of the 
university or his designee shall be final. 

The word 'domicile' as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent place of 
abode. For the purpose of this rule, only one domicile may be maintained at a given 
time. 




37 



THE GRADUATE PROGRAM 



4*4. 

n 
t 



THE GRADUATE PROGRAM 

INTRODUCTION 

The School of Pharmacy offers, through the Graduate School of the University of 
Maryland, programs leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees in medicinal chemistry, pharmacognosy, pharmacology and toxicology and 
pharmacy. There is also a Graduate Residency Program in Hospital Pharmacy leading 
to a Master of Science degree and a Certificate of Residency in Hospital Pharmacy. 

The facilities for research and graduate instruction consist of specialized laboratories 
containing a wide range of modern equipment. Major equipment includes a gas 
chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer, nuclear magnetic resonance 
spectrometers, Magnaferm Fermentor and Bioflofermentor, plant tissue culture and 
biotransformation equipment, instrumented rotary and single punch tablet machines, 
complete aerosol equipment, equipment for radioactive counting and synthesis of 
radioactive compounds, in addition to other standard research equipment. The Health 
Sciences Library located on the campus contains a wide selection of specialized books 
and research journals and a Health Sciences Computer Center is also located on 
campus. 

Most of the faculty at the School of Pharmacy are actively engaged in research and 
are well qualified to direct research in many areas including neuropharmacology, 
biochemical pharmacology, toxicology, synthesis and structure activity relationships 
of pharmacologically active compounds, pharmaceutical analysis, radiopharmaceuti- 
cals, isolation and structure elucidation of natural occurring compounds, biopharma- 
ceutics, physical pharmacy, industrial pharmacy and institutional pharmacy. 



fc 

i 




38 



GRADUATE PROGRAM 

IN 
MEDICINAL 
CHEMISTRY 

Programs of Study 

The Department of Medicinal Chemistry offers graduate programs of study leading to 
the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in medicinal chemistry. 
Current research emphasis is on drug metabolism and on the development of 
radiopharmaceuticals, but research in analytical and synthetic medicinal chemistry is 
also in progress. 

The goal of the department's graduate program is to prepare medicinal chemists for 
academic, industrial or government careers. Applications are preferred from 
candidates with a strong background in chemistry, biology or pharmaceutical 
sciences. 

Students are guided through their graduate program by an advisory committee which 
designs a program in cooperation with the student to meet the needs and interests of 
the individual student. The student must complete a core of courses and choose 
electives from a wide range of available courses. An independent research project 
must be completed under the direction of a faculty member and presented as a thesis 
or dissertation to the Graduate School. The Doctor of Philosophy program can 
usually be completed in four years. 

Research Facilities 

The department, an administrative unit of the School of Pharmacy, is located in 
modern, air conditioned facilities. The specialized laboratories of the department are 
equipped with the appropriate instrumentation (e.g. mass spectrometer) to carry out 
the ongoing research programs of the department. A computer center and the 
Health Sciences Library are located within a block of the department. 

Financial Aid 

Research and tuition-free teaching assistantships and fellowships are available to 
qualified students. 

Cost of Living 

Estimates for single students range between $3,500 and $4,500 per year. Limited on- 
campus housing for men and women is available and meals can be purchased at 
numerous facilities on or near the campus. 

Applying 

Two copies of the completed application and two copies of official transcripts from 
each college or university attended must be received by the Dean for Graduate Studies 
and Research by May 15th for the summer semester, July 1 for the fall semester and 
December 1 for the winter semester. 

Correspondence 

Address requests for information and application forms to Chairman, Department of 
Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 636 West Lombard 
Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. Telephone: (301) 528-7440. 



39 



8 



i 



FACULTY 

Patrick S. Callery, Ph.D. (1974), University of California, San Francisco. Assistant 
Professor of Medicinal Chemistry. Studies of the metabolism and disposition of 
drugs; radioactive and stable isotope labelling; biomedical applications of mass 
spectrometry. 

S. Edward Krikorian, Ph.D. (1967), Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Associate 
Professor of Medicinal Chemistry. Studies of near-infrared spectroscopy with 
possible applications to pharmaceutical analysis; gas-solid chromatographic behavior 
of the salt forms of acidic and basic drugs. 

James Leslie, Ph.D. (1959), Queen's University, Belfast. Associate Professor of 
Medicinal Chemistry. Kinetics of chemical reactions of biochemical interest; kinetics 
of biological processes. 

Michael D. Loberg, Ph.D. (1973), Washington University, St. Louis. Associate Professor 
of Medicinal Chemistry and Nuclear Medicine. Synthesis of radioactive drugs for 
diagnostic use in humans; use of radiopharmaceuticals for the visualization of 
internal organs and for the measurement of regional rates of metabolism. 



Theodore A. van der Hoeven, Ph.D. (1971), Columbia University. Assistant Professor 
of Medicinal Chemistry. Induction and control mechanism of drug metabolism in 
isolated hepatocytes. Isolation and characterization of components of cytochrome 
t : P-450 dependent mixed function oxidase in liver microsomes. 

J£ Jeremy Wright, Ph.D. (1965), University of London. Associate Professor of Medicinal 

Chemistry. Drug metabolism studies. Investigation of toxic intermediates in 
£& biotransformation reactions. Stereochemical studies of metabolic reactions using 

b>* isotopically labelled compounds and gas chromatographic mass spectrometric 

*"J. techniques. 

St Nicolas Zenker, Ph.D. (1958), University of California. Chairman and Professor of 

lijb Medicinal Chemistry. Studies of enzymes and metabolic inhibitors. Thyroid-adrenal 

Kl relationships. 

fc~' The following partial list of topics is representative of research either currently in 

jr progress or recently completed: 

|r • "Kit" Preparation of radioiodinated Antologous Fibrinogen Using 131 I- 

Monochloride. 

• Ion Molecule Reactions in Methyl Halides. 

• A Simple and Precise Assay of the Enzymatic Conversion of Cholesterol into 
Pregnenolone. 

• Cytochrome P-450 Purified to Apparent Homogeneity from Phenobarbital- 
Induced Rabbit Liver Microsomes: Catalytic Activity and other Properties. 

• Biochemical Characterization of Highly Purified Cytochrome P-450 and other 
Components of the Mixed Function Oxidase System of Liver Microsomal 
Membranes. 

MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY 

COURSES 

(MCHM) 

MCHM 420: Instrumental Methods of Pharmaceutical Analysis (3) Two lectures, 
one laboratory, spring term. Prerequisites: organic chemistry, quantitative analysis. A 
survey of electrometric, spectroscopic, and chromatographic methods of chemical 
analysis as applied especially to the analysis of materials of pharmaceutical interests. 
Basic principles and applications of the various techniques will be stressed so that the 
student will gain an appreciation of the scope and utility of the methods discussed. 

40 



MCHM 431,432: Biochemistry I and II (3,3) Fall term, three lectures; spring term, 
two lectures, one laboratory. Prerequisite: one year of organic chemistry. Physical 
and chemical properties of the components of living systems and of the metabolic 
processes in health and disease. 

MCHM 441,444: Chemistry of Medicinal Products I and II (3,2) Fall term, three 
lectures; spring term, two lectures. Prerequisite: one year organic chemistry. A survey 
of chemical properties, structure activity relationships, and metabolism of organic 
medicinal products. 

MCHM 454: Physical Chemistry II (3) Three lectures per week for two months. 
Prerequisite: calculus. An introduction to chemical kinetics molecular structure. 

MCHM 470: Basic Nuclear Science (3) Three lectures per week. Prerequisite: one 
year of college chemistry and one year of college physics or consent of instructor. A 
study of the safe and effective use of radiotracers with emphasis on nuclear physics 
instrumentation for in vivo radioassay, counting statistics, tracer chemistry and 
radiation safety. 

MCHM 471: Basic Nuclear Science Laboratory (1) One three-hour laboratory 
period per week. Prerequisite: concurrent registration in MCHM/MEDC 470 or 
consent of instructor. Training in the safe and effective use of radiotracers and 
nuclear instrumentation. 

MCHM 640: Structure Elucidation of Medicinal Agents (2) Two lectures per week. 
Prerequisite: organic chemistry, MCHM 420 or consent of instructor. A survey of 
structure determination as applied to biologically active substances. 

MCHM 739: Seminar (1) Each semester, Required of students majoring in 
medicinal chemistry. Reports of progress and survey of recent developments in 
chemistry. 




41 



MCHM 741: Physical Organic Basis of Medicinal Chemistry (3) Three lectures, fall 
term. Prerequisite: physical chemistry, intermediate organic chemistry. A discussion 
of atomic structure, bonding, resonance, kinetics and mechanism of organic 
reactions; sterochemistry and conformation analysis. 

MCHM 769: Topics in Structure Activity Relationships (2) Two lectures, spring 
term, odd years. Prerequisite: MCHM 441,442,741. Discussions of drug-receptor 
interactions and of the known chemical factors which mediate drug action, including a 
discussion of the current quantitative concepts of structure activity relationships in 
medicinal chemistry. 

MCHM 773: Biological Kinetics (2) Fall term, even years. Prerequisite: MCHM 454. 
Kinetics of complex systems applicable to drug distribution, medicinal and metabolic 
systems. Derivation of equations, mathematical models and application of experi- 
mental data to equations and models. 

MCHM 781: Enzyme and Metabolic Inhibitors (2) Two lectures, fall term, odd 
Ijjj years. Prerequisite: MCHM 431, 432. A discussion of the design, the mode of action at 

L: the enzymatic level, and the metabolism of biochemical analogs. 

ft* MCHM 783: Enzyme and Metabolic Inhibitors Laboratory (1) One laboratory (can 

W" only be taken concurrently with MCHM 781), fall term, odd years. Laboratory 

experiments or projects illustrating basic techniques in enzyme methodology, 
jjj? including enzyme inhibition in vitro and in vivo. 

t) MCHM 799: Thesis Research Master's Level, (Variable Credit), Staff 

J* MCHM 899: Dissertation Research Doctoral Level (Variable Credit), Staff 

GRADUATE PROGRAM IN PHARMACOLOGY AND 
TOXICOLOGY 






P Programs of Study 

**" The Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology offers graduate programs of study 

for] leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in 

W pharmacology. The research emphases of the departmental faculty include such 

Kr areas as psychopharmacology, neuropharmacology, behavioral pharmacology, 

biochemical pharmacology, toxicology, and pharmacokinetics. 

The goal of the department's graduate program is to prepare scholar-scientists for 
careers in pharmacology and/or toxicology. Candidates for admission should possess 
a strong background in chemistry and/or biology or pharmaceutical sciences. 
Graduate study committees aid in the planning and implementing of each student's 
program. Annual reviews are conducted to evaluate the student's progress toward 
the degree, based on faculty assessment of his coursework and seminar and research 
performance. Successful completion of written and oral comprehensive examina- 
tions is required prior to the student's admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree. 
The candidate is required to successfully defend a dissertation based on indepen- 
dent research. Students are expected to pursue graduate studies on a full-time basis. 
Completion of the Graduate School's doctoral requirements is usually accomplished 
within four years. 

Research Facilities 

The department's research facilities are located in the School of Pharmacy on the 
Baltimore City campus of the University of Maryland. The department is equipped for 
research with a behavioral, biochemical, or physiological orientation. Membersof the 



42 



department have access to all supportive facilities of the professional school complex. 
These facilities include a computer center and a modern Health Sciences Library 
containing more than 140,000 bound volumes and 2,700 scientific journals. 

Applying 

Two copies of the completed application and two copies of official transcripts from 
each college or university attended must be received by the Dean for Graduate Studies 
and Research by May 15 for the summer semester, July 1 for the fall semester and 
December 1 for the winter and spring semesters. Requests for applications should be 
directed to the Dean for Graduate Studies and Research, University of Maryland, Bal- 
timore, Maryland 212011 

Correspondence and Information 

Director of Graduate Studies 

Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology 

University of Maryland School of Pharmacy 

636 West Lombard Street 

Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



FACULTY 

Joseph S. Adir, Ph.D. (1972), State University of New York at Buffalo. Assistant 
Professor. Biopharmaceutical and physiological factors affecting the bioavailability of 
drugs; kinetics of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs, and 
their clinical implications; correlation between plasma levels and drug pharma- 
cologic action. 

Gary G. Buterbaugh, Ph.D. (1969), University of Iowa. Associate Professor. Influence 
of seizure activity on brain monoamine dynamics; neurochemistry of seizure 
propagation; maturation of inhibitory mechanisms limiting the propagation of 
seizure activity; mechanisms of action of convulsants and anticonvulsants as related 
to monoaminergic pathways. 

David G. Hattan, Ph.D. (1973), Ohio State University. Assistant Professor. Neurochem- 
ical mechanisms of behavior and their modification by drugs; thermoregulatory 
responses mediated by centrally administered agents. 

Casmir T. Ichniowski, Ph.D. (1936), University of Maryland. Emerson Professor of 
Pharmacology. Bioassay and efficiency of drug combination. 

Nairn Khazan, Ph.D. (1960), Hebrew University (Jerusalem). Professor and Chairman. 
Neuropsychopharmacology-neurophysiology and pharmacology of sleep; evoked 
potentials and EEG effects of hallucinogens; observational methods in CNS drug 
evaluation; EEG, behavioral, and pharmacological effects of drugs of abuse; 
experimental addiction to morphine in the rat; the effects of morphine antagonists in 
suppressing relapse. 

William J. Kinnard, Jr., Ph.D. (1957), Purdue University. Professor and Dean, School of 
Pharmacy. Behavioral pharmacology; cardiovascular pharmacology; drug screening 
techniques. 

J. Edward Moreton, Ph.D. (1971), University of Mississippi. Neuropharmacology and 
behavioral pharmacology as they relate to the study of drug abuse and drug 
dependence; EEG and behavioral correlates of addiction; drug self-administration in 
the rat and rhesus monkey. 



43 



e 



The following partial list of topics is representative of research either currently in 
progress or recently completed: 

• Electroencephalographs studies on the development of tolerance and cross 
tolerance to mescaline in the rat 

• Naltrexone blockade of development of long-term EEG and behavioral effect of 
morphine in the rat 

• Modification of electroshock convulsant threshold and pattern by digitoxigenin and 
serotonergic systems 

• Alterations in EEG, EMG and behavior produced by acute ethanol administration. 

• Modification by p-chloroamphetamine of the EEG and behavioral responses to 
morphine challenge in the rat 

• Drug self-administration and sleep-awake activity in rats dependent on morphine, 
methadone or l-alpha-acetylmethadol. 

• Regional brain uptake and distribution of H 3 -digitoxigenin. 

PHARMACOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY 
COURSES 
u (PCOL) 

*' PCOL 601,602: Advanced Toxicology (3,4) Lectures with conferences and laborato- 

E?! ry experiments dealing with the mechanisms of toxicity. A two-semester course, either 

««■ semester may be taken separately. PCOL 601: Clinical and Environmental Toxicology 

g£ (fall semester). PCOL 602: Principles of Investigative Toxicology (spring semester). 

Prerequisites: biochemistry (MCHM 431 ,432), anatomy and physiology (PCOL 331,332) 

or equivalent and consent of the instructor. 
L* 

*^ PCOL 643,644: Pharmacodynamics I, II (4,4) Pharmacodynamics deals with the 

£t study of the biochemical and physiological effects of drugs on biological systems. The 

j£ course deals with the mechanisms by which pharmacological agents interact with the 

[§• living organism in order to provide the student with a rational basis for therapeutic 

j£ uses, side effects and adverse reactions and drug interactions. The major areas to be 

to covered are the pharmacodynamics of drugs influencing the peripheral nervous 

system, the central nervous system and the endocrine system. In addition, physio- 
logical and biochemical effects of chemotherapeutic agents will also be considered. 
E These lectures (PCOL 441,442) will be supplemented by weekly conferences and 

Jg discussion groups. Students are required to submit acceptable written therapeutic 

projects covering a topic in advanced pharmacology and therapeutics. Prerequisites: 
anatomy and physiology (PCOL 331,332) and biochemistry (MCHM 431,432) or 
equivalent and consent of the course director. 

PCOL 707: Principles of Biochemical Pharmacology (3) Offered in alternate years. 
Two lectures, one laboratory weekly. A theoretical and practical approach tothe study 
of the cellular and subcellular actions of drugs and the relationship of these actions to 
the pharmacological properties of medicinal agents in the intact organism. 
Prerequisites: Pharmacodynamics I, II (PCOL 441,442), Biochemistry (MCHM 431,432) 
or equivalent and consent of the instructor. 

PCOL 737: Pharmacometrics and Experimental Design (3) A discussion of the 
theoretical and practical application of statistics and experimental design to enablethe 
student to utilize these tools in research problems. 

PCOL 747: Physiological Disposition of Drugs (3) Offered in alternate years. Two 
hours of lecture weekly and laboratory projects equivalent to one laboratory per week. 
A detailed study of the principles of drug transport, distribution, biotransformation, 
binding and excretion with emphasis on quantitative aspects and measurement of 
these processes. Prerequisites: anatomy and physiology (PCOL 331,332 or equivalent), 



44 



Pharmacodynamics I, II (PCOL 441,442 or equivalent), Pharmacodynamics I, II (PCOL 
441,442 or equivalent), calculus and consent of the instructor. 

PCOL 789: Seminar (1) Each semester. Reports on current literature or research in 
progress. Prerequisite: consent of the department staff member designated as 
responsible for seminar. 

PCOL 799: Master's Thesis Research in Pharmacology Properly qualified students 
may arrange with their advisor for credit and hours. 

PCOL 829: Advanced Pharmacodynamics (3) A coordinated series of four one- 
semester courses involving two hours of lecture weekly together with conferences and 
special laboratory exercises. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: Pharmacody- 
namics I, II (PCOL 441,442) or equivalent. 

829A — Neuropsychopharmacology 

829B — Autonomic Pharmacology 

829C — Cardiovascular Pharmacology 

829D1 — Renal and Endocrine Pharmacology 

PCOL 858: Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics (2-4) Each semester. Laboratories 
and conferences. Credit according to the amount of work undertaken after 
consultation with the instructor. Prerequisite: Pharmacodynamics I, II (PCOL 441,442) 
or equivalent. These studies include: principles of drug action, techniques in 
pharmacology and biometrics. 

PCOL 899: Doctoral Dissertation Research in Pharmacology Properly qualified 
students may arrange with their advisor for credit and hours. 

GRADUATE PROGRAM IN PHARMACY 

The Department of Pharmacy offers programs of advanced study and research in 
pharmaceutics and institutional pharmacy. 

PHARMACEUTICS 
(PHAR) 

Goals 

The goal of the pharmaceutics program is to provide a broad based educational 
background emphasizing the theoretical and technical disciplines essential for dosage 
form design and evaluation. There is a continuing need for such pharmaceutical 
scientists in the research and development laboratories of the pharmaceutical 
industry, in education and with government regulatory and research agencies. 

Degrees Offered 

M.S. (thesis option only) and Ph.D. 

Specialties 

Industrial pharmacy, biopharmaceutics, and physical pharmacy. A radiopharmacy 
(M.S. only) tract is offered in conjunction with the School of Medicine. 

Program 

Coursework — Students select a program of coursework which includes (1) a core of 
basic and pharmaceutic sciences common to all students, and (2) those additional 
courses in the major and supporting areas which most adequately prepare them for 
their career goals in one of the specialities. Courses are drawn not only from the 
departmental offerings, but also from the relevant graduate offerings of other 
departments within the School of Pharmacy and in the other health profession schools 



45 



5 


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• 


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• 




• 


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on the University of Maryland at Baltimore campus. The close proximity of the 
University of Maryland to Baltmore County campus (approximately 10 miles) also 
provides a ready resource for basic sciences and other supportive courses, as do the 
numerous other colleges and universities located in the metropolitan area. 

Research 

Research is an essential part of the total academic program in pharmaceutics. A 
competent staff actively working in the program specialties are available to direct 
research. The broad range of faculty interests within the various specialties provides 
the student with a wide range of possibilities for exciting and stimulating research. In 
addition, common interests between departments within the school as well as 
between the School of Pharmacy and the other health professions schools on the 
campus provide the student with a unique opportunity for interdisciplinary research 
and study. 

The following partial list of topics is representative of research projects either currently 
in progress or recently completed: 

The Stability of Nitroglycerin Tablets Packaged in Dispensing Containers 
The Stability of Nitroglycerin in Parenteral Solutions 
Pharmacokinetics of Nicotine in Animals 
Instrumentation of an Automatic Capsule Filling Machine 
Effect of Disease States on the Pharmacokinetics of Cardiovascular Drugs 
Evaluation of Sucrose Esters as Lubricants in Direct Compression Tableting 
Effect of Formulation and Processing Variables on the Bioavailability of Drugs from 
Hard Gelatin Capsules 

Quantitative GLC Determination of Caffeine in Human Sera 
Dose Dependent Pharmacokinetics of Digoxin 

Some Important Physical and Mechanical Properties of Direct Compression Tablet 
Fillers 
• Development of Radiopharmaceuticals for Use in Diagnostic Medicine 

Special Facilities 

A wide range of equipment and instruments isavailableto permit study overthe broad 
ij* range of interests and specialties represented in the department. 

►£ The graduate industrial and physical pharmacy laboratories include various types of 

£» viscometers, dissolution equipment, stability chambers, rotary and single punch tablet 

presses, including induced die feed, freeze and fluidized bed driers, tablet coating 
equipment and complete aerosol equipment. Also included is a specially equipped 
solids research laboratory which includes an instrumented rotary tablet press, an 
instrumented modern automatic capsule filling machine, powder flow meters and 
other specialized equipment. 

The school's Clinical Pharmacokinetics Laboratory is unique in that it fosters the 
strengths of the various pharmaceutical and medical disciplines on the University of 
Maryland at Baltimore campus through the development of a combined service- 
educational-research effort which: (a) performs pharmacokinetic analysis in patients 
undergoing or being considered for long term treatment with select drugs; (b) 
develops under and post-graduate educational programs in pharmacokinetics; and (c) 
initiates multifaceted pharmacokinetic research projects involving both clinical and 
basic themes. This laboratory, which provides an extensive resource for bio- 
pharmaceutical-pharmacokinetic research, is equipped with such modern instru- 
ments as gas chromatographs with automatic sampler injection, liquid scintillation 
spectrometers, a desk top mini-computer-calculator and more. 

A well equipped radiopharmacy laboratory is available in cooperation with the 
school's medicinal chemistry department. 



46 



Financial Assistance 

Several types of financial assistance are available to qualified graduate students. 
Teaching assistantships providing ample stipend and remission of tuition and fees are 
available for entering graduate students. Research fellowships and consultantships are 
usually available for advanced students. 

Entrance Requirements 

Applicants should have a degree in pharmacy. Majors in chemistry, biology, 
engineering or physics will also be considered, although such students may be 
required to take some additional undergraduate courses to fulfill requirements. 

FACULTY 

Joseph Adir, Associate Professor of Pharmacy and Pharmacology-Toxicology, Director 
of the Clinical Pharmacokinetics Laboratory. Before receiving his Doctor of Philosophy 
degree from the State University of New York at Buffalo in 1972, he spent several years 
as an industrial pharmacist in Israel. His research interests include biopharmaceutical 
and physiological factors affecting the bioavailability of drugs, kinetics of absorption, 
distribution, metabolism and excretion of drugs, and computer analysis of biological 
data. 

Larry L. Augsburger, Associate Professor of Pharmacy and Director of the Pharmaceu- 
tics Graduate Program. He received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in 1967 from the 
University of Maryland and before joining the staff, he was a senior research 
pharmacist at the Johnson and Johnson Research Center. His research interests include 
industrial pharmacy, formulation and processing factors affecting drug bioavailability, 
physical and mechanical properties of pharmaceutical solids and solid dosage forms, 
instrumentation of tablet presses and capsule filling machines and rheology. 

William G. Crouthamel, Associate Professor of Pharmacy. Received his Ph.D. degree in 
1970 at the University of Kentucky. Before joining the staff, he was an associate 
professor at West Virginia University School of Pharmacy. His current research 
interests include biopharmaceutics, pharmacokinetics, gastrointestinal absorption, 
lipid pharmacology, and the effects of disease states on drug pharmacokinetics. 

Peter P. Lamy, Professor of Pharmacy and Director, Institutional Pharmacy Programs. 
Fellow of the American College of Clinical Pharmacology. He received his Ph.D. in 
1964 from the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science. He is a prolific writer who 
has authored more than 130 scientific and professional papers, including several book 
chapters. Included among his research interests are drug-drug interactions, drug-food 
interactions, geriatrics, drug distribution, patient education, large volume parenterals 
and OTC drugs. 

Michael D. Loberg, Associate Professor of Pharmacy, Medicinal Chemistry and 
Nuclear Medicine, and Director of Radiopharmaceutical Service at the University of 
Maryland Hospital. Received his Ph.D. in chemistry from Washington University in 
1973. His research interests include development of radiopharmaceuticals for use in 
diagnostic medicine and pharmacokinetics. 

Ralph F. Shangraw, Professor of Pharmacy and Chairman of the Pharmacy Department. 
He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1958. He then joined the staff, 
becoming professor and chairman in 1969. He is a consultant to the pharmaceutical 
industry and a leader in professional and scientific organizations. He has been a 
member of the U.S. P. Committee of Revision since 1970 and is presently chairman of 
the Subcommittee on Formulations. He has published more than 50 research papers 
and includes among his research interests industrial pharmacy (tableting, aerosols, 
rheology, emulsions and foams) stability (nitroglycerin) packaging and bioavailability. 



47 



Applications 

For additional information on graduate study in pharmaceutics or institutional 
pharmacy and for application forms, write: 

Director, Pharmaceutics or Institutional Pharmacy and for application forms, 
write: 

Director, Pharmaceutics Graduate Program 

or 
Director, Institutional Pharmacy Programs 
Department of Pharmacy 
University of Maryland School of Pharmacy 
636 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

PHARMACY COURSES 
| (PHAR) 

PHAR 441: Biopharmaceutics (3) Fall term. A study of the physical, chemical and 
biological factors which influence drug action with an emphasis on the choice of 
dosage forms and formulations to optimize therapeutic effect. 

«£ Phar 453: Cosmetics and Dermatological Preparations (2) A presentation of the 

t* essential components of specialized areas of cosmetics and cosmetic-like preparations 
used in pharmacy. The course is designed to familiarize students with ingredients and 

■ processes involved in the formulation, manufacture, and quality control of cosmetics. 

fc* Lectures and topics on the fundamentals of cosmetic law and government regulations 

^ of importance to pharmacists. Field trips to Noxell Corporation to acquaint the 

m pharmacy student with the manufacturing operation on a commericial scale. 

PHAR 454: Institutional Pharmacy I (2) Fall term, four lectures/week for two 
months. Fundamentals of institutional pharmacy practice and administration with 
emphasis on hospital and nursing homes. Includes physical facilities, standards, 
purchasing, formulary, record-keeping, drug distribution and control systems. 

E PHAR 455: Institutional Pharmacy II (2) Spring term, four lectures/week for two 

jfr months. A study of the administrative organization of health care institutions and 

m interrelationship of various units with the pharmacy. Includes in-depth, individual 

study of one particular aspect of institutional pharmacy practice. 

PHAR 461: Therapeutics (3) Fall term, six hours/week for two months. A course 
designed to present basic principles of rational drug therapy within the context of 
various pathophysiologic processes which the student has already learned. Concur- 
rently, salient points in the evaluation of therapeutic literature will be discussed. 

PHAR 462: Pharmacy and the Health Care System (2) Spring term, four lec- 
tures/week for two months. (Undergraduates with permission of the instructor). A 
course designed to familiarize pharmacists with the total health care environment; to 
introduce applicable analytical and technical skills, such as systems analysis and 
computer science; to identify the various social, political, economic and professional 
pressures which are influencing developments in health care; and to increase the 
pharmacist's appreciation of the changes affecting the health care system. 

PHAR 602: Advanced Biopharmaceutics (3) Three lectures, given in alternate years. 
Prerequisites: PHAR 441, PCOL 441,442 and calculus. With the consent of the instructor 
some or all of these prerequisites may be waived. A clinically-oriented in-depth study 
of the factors affecting the time-course of drugs with emphasis on the implication and 
qualification of these factors in the disease state. 



48 



PHAR 610: Pharmaceutical Formulation and Unit Processes (3) Three lectures, fall 
term, given in alternate years. Prerequisites: PHAR 333 and 334. With the consent of the 
instructor some or all of these prerequisites may be waived. A study of the processes 
and equipment involved in the large-scale manufacture of pharmaceuticals, including 
a discussion of control procedures, new drug applications, patents, and the federal 
Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 

PHAR 612: Drug Stability and Packaging Technology (3) Three lectures, spring 
term, given in alternate years. Prerequisites: PHAR 334 and 441. With the consent of the 
instructor some or all of these prerequisites may be waived. A study of drug stability as 
affected by environment and containers with emphasis on the physical and chemical 
properties of both the drugs and the component parts of the container as well as the 
practical problems of drug packaging, storage and clinical effectiveness. 

PHAR 701: Theoretical Aspects of Liquid Dosage Forms (3) Three lectures, fall term, 
given in alternate years. Prerequisites: PHAR 33,334 and an acceptable course in 
physical chemistry. With the consent of the instructor some or all of these prerequisites 
may be waived. The application of fundamental physiocochemical concepts of 
solution theory, colloids, rheology and surface chemistry in order to gain an 
understanding of liquid dosage forms. 

PHAR 702: Theoretical Aspects of Solid Dosage Forms (3) Three lectures, spring 
term, given in alternate years. Prerequisites: PHAR 33,334 and an acceptable course in 
physical chemistry. With the consent of the instructor some or all of these prerequisites 
may be waived. A survey of the fundamentals relevant to the performance and 
processing of solid dosage forms. As most pharmaceuticals are prepared from 
powders, special emphasis is given to means of identifying, measuring and controlling 
those properties that determine the processing characteristics of powdered materials. 

PHAR 703: Industrial Pharmacy Laboratory (2) Two laboratories, given in alternate 
years. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Laboratory practice in the preparation of 
useful and important pharmaceuticals in large quantity, including the observance of 
federal "Good Manufacturing Practices." 




49 



t 



& 



PHAR 705,706: Special Topics in Pharmaceutics (2,2) Two laboratories. A study of 
the special problems involved in the design, manufacturing and distribution of phar- 
maceutical products including stabilization, preservation, optimization of drug avail- 
ability, packaging and drug utilization. 

PHAR 708: Product Development Laboratory (2-4) Each semester, laboratories and 
conferences as needed. Credit according to the amount of work undertaken after 
consultation with the instructor. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. The de- 
velopment of new pharmaceutical or cosmetic preparations from concept through 
marketing. 

PHAR 709: Pharmaceutical Seminar (1) Each semester. Required of students 
majoring in pharmacy. Reports of progress in research and surveys of recent 
developments in pharmacy. 

PHAR 801: Physical Pharmacy (3) Prerequisite: One year of college level physical 
chemistry. A study of pharmaceutical systems using the fundamentals of physical 
chemistry. In particular, the course aims to provide the graduate student with a 
deeper understanding of some fundamental concepts of thermodynamics. In 
addition, basic concepts of chemical kinetics will be introduced with applications to 
the decomposition of medicinal agents. 



PHAR 803,804: Product Development (2,2) Two laboratories. Prerequisites: PHAR 
E- 453, 701, 702, 703, 704. A study of the development of new pharmaceutical 

% preparations and cosmetics suitable for marketing. 

ft PHAR 799: Thesis Research Masters Level (Variable credit), staff. 

PHAR 899: Dissertation Research Doctoral Level (Variable credit), staff. 



INSTITUTIONAL PHARMACY 
(PHIN) 



« Goals 

fcg The institutional pharmacy program aims at the education of pharmacists to function 

Sj primarily in the patient care environment of institutions or other organized health 

jjk care settings. Emphasis is placed on providing an optimum mix of administrative and 

patient-oriented (clinical) background, both from a theoretical as well as a practical 

point of view. 

Degree Offered 

M.S. (Thesis option only) 

Program: 

Coursework — The program of coursework is based on established courses in the 
pharmacy curriculum and also utilizes course offerings by the Schools of Medicine, 
Nursing and Social Work and Community Planning. The student may pursue the 
degree in one of three ways: 

• A full-time M.S. program, which usually will involve a two-year commitment. 

• A part-time course of study. This is open to a limited number of exceptionally well 
qualified practitioners who hold responsible positions in institutional pharmacy in 
the Baltimore-D. C. metropolitan areas. 

• A joint M.S. - Residency Program (in conjunction with an area hospital). 
Participating hospitals include University of Maryland (accredited by A.S.H.P.), The 
Johns Hopkins Hospital (accredited by A.S.H.P.) and the V.A. Hospital in 
Washington, D. C. Students completing both parts receive an M.S. degree from the 



50 



University of Maryland and a Certificate of Residency from the cooperating 
hospital. The residency carries an attractive stipend. 

Research 

In addition to coursework, the student must satisfactorily complete a program of 
research which will result in an acceptable thesis. Some previous thesis topics 
include: 

• Drug-Utilization Review in a Day Treatment Center 

• A Cost-Comparison of Unit Dose in Adult and Pediatric Medicine 

• Efficacy of Preservatives in Radiopharmaceuticals 

• Reinforcement Theory and Patient Education 

• Staffing Requirements for Institutional Pharmacy 

• Medication Errors in a Multidose and a Computerized Unit Dose Drug Distribution 
System 

• Physician-Patient Encounter in Pediatric Ambulatory Services 

• Patient Education and Patient Compliance in Diabetic Patients 

Special Facilities 

The program has access to all previously described laboratories and utilizes course 
offerings by the Schools of Medicine, Nursing and Social Work and Community 
Planning. The combined facilities of the participating hospitals offer all aspects of 
institutional pharmacy, such as centralized and decentralized unit-dose distribution 
systems, computer systems, drug information, IV admixture and TPN services, patient 
counselling, rounding, audit, DUR, etc. 

Financial Aid 

Under the joint M.S. /Residency Program, the student receives a stipend from the 
hospital. Financial support for the M.S. program without a residency is not currently 
available. 

Entrance Requirements 

Entrance requirements are the same as those for the pharmaceutics program except 
that applicants must have a degree in pharmacy. Having met these requirements, the 
applicant who elects one of the M.S./residency programs must also apply to the 
preceptor of the residency in his choice. Applicants accepted into the joint program 
with the University of Maryland Hospital and The Johns Hopkins Hospital must be 
eligible for licensure in Maryland within six months of graduation. Those accepted 
into the program at the Veterans Administration Hospital (Washington) must show 
proof of licensure at the beginning of the program. 

GRADUATE PROGRAM 
IN PHARMACOGNOSY 

Facilities and Equipment 

The Department of Pharmacognosy research facilities occupy the sixth floor of the 
Allied Health Professions Building. These facilities include two phytochemical 
research laboratories, two fermentation research laboratories, an instrument room, 
grinding room, extraction room, chromatography room and microbiological 
preparation rooms. The laboratories are designed for general phytochemical and 
fermentation research. For this end they are equipped with the complete 
chromatographic facilities necessary for research and include various types and sizes 
of chromatographic columns, fraction collectors, various styles and sizes of 
chromatographic tanks for both one and two-dimensional and preparative thin-layer 
and paper chromatography. 



51 



Specialized phytochemical equipment includes a Lloyd extractor, Wiley and Fitz 
mills, two large scale cold extractors and recycling apparatus and a Virtus lyophilizer 
with shelf trays and drum evaporator. Specialized equipment for fermentative studies 
include numerous floor model shakers and a 653 Rotatory Shaker, Magnaferm 
fermentors, a bioflow chemostate and tissue culture roller apparatus. The 
department has available a Varian T-60A NMR spectrophotometer, an Aerograph 
2100 gas chromatographer, a Waters 6000 liquid chromatograph, Beckman IR 18A 
infrared spectrophotometer, a Varian 635 UV spectrophotometer, an IEC UV 
centrifuge and electrophoresis for starch, paper and gel electrophoresis. 

Research Interests 

The Department of Pharmacognosy is interested in three basic areas of research: 
tissue culture, isolation and structure elucidation of natural products; and 
fermentation sciences. Currently the various department members are involved in 
development of antibiotics from various strains of Streptomyces, the taxonomic 
studies of Streptomyces obtained from soil samples used in a screen for novel 
antibiotics and biosynthetic studies on anthramycin and daunomycin. An ongoing 
project involves studies on the environmental effects of pesticides on Chesapeake 
Bay fungi and the possible use of these organisms in breakdown and biotransforma- 
tion of recalcitrant pesticides. Tissue culture studies include the effects of enzyme 
produced by various genera of Papaver on the biotransformation of opium alkaloids 
and the formation of alkaloids in statis culture. Also, there is a study on the 
production and biosynthesis of the cannabanoids by statis and single cell culture of 
Cannabis sativa. Work is being performed on South American and Nigerian plants 
which have been used by natives as medicinal plants with the thought of isolating and 
structurally identifying the phytoconstituents responsible for the physiological 
activity. 




52 



FACULTY 



Ralph N. Blomster, Ph.D. (1963), University of Connecticut, Professor of Pharmacog- 
nosy and Department Chairman. Areas of research interest include physochemistry 
and phytochemical screening, medicinal folklore evaluation and thin-layer chroma- 
tography. 

Jerry D. Skarbek, Ph.D. (1972), University of Washington, Assistant Professor. Areas of 
research interest include antibiotic studies of streptomyces. 

Karl-Heinz A. Rosier, Ph.S. (1960), University of Munich, Associate Professor of 
Pharmacognosy. Areas of research interest include the synthesis and structure 
elucidation of quinone derivatives of flavonoids with potential antitumor activity; 
isolation and structure elucidation of phytoconstituents from Nigerian plants with 
cytotoxic activity; synthesis and structure proof of modified flavonoids with potential 
hypotensive activity. 

Marilyn K. Speedie, Ph.D. (1973), Purdue University, Assistant Professor. Areas of 
research interest include biosynthesis and regulation of formation of secondary 
metabolites, especially antibiotics; enzymology and genetics of control mechanisms. 

The following partial list of topics is representative of research either currently in 
progress or recently completed: 

• The biosynthesis of indolmycin 

• The isolation of 6-hydroxyharman form Crew/a mollis. 

• Schiffs bases of betalamic acid. 



PHARMACOGNOSY 

COURSES 

(PCOG) 

PCOG 411,412: Plant Anatomy (2,2) Two lectures a week. Prerequisites: PCOG 
441,442. 

PCOG 413,414: Plant Anatomy Laboratory (2,2) Two laboratories a week. 
Prerequisites: PCOG 411, 412, 441, 442. Laboratory work covering advanced plant 
anatomy with special emphasis placed on the structure of roots, stems, and leaves of 
vascular plants. 

PCOG 421,422: Taxonomy of the Higher Plants (2,2) Given in alternate years. One 
lecture and one laboratory. Prerequisites: PCOG 441,442. A study of the kinds of seed 
plants and ferns, their classification, and field work on local flora. Instruction will be 
given in the preparation of an herbarium. 

PCOG 446: Serology, Immunology, Public Health and Parasitology (4) Prerequi- 
sites: PCOG 332-343 or its equivalent. Two lectures and two laboratories. A study of 
the principles of immunity, including the preparation and use of biological products 
employed in the preparation and treatment of infectious diseases. Attention is given 
to hypersensitivity of humans and animals. Part of the course is devoted to the study 
of public health. Time is given to the study of medical parasitology, pathology and 
parasitic infections. 

PCOG 640: Structure Elucidation of Medical Agents (2) Two lectures per week. 
Prerequisites: organic chemistry, MCHM 420, or consent of instructor. A survey of 
structure determination methods as applied to biologically active substances. 



53 



r 



PCOG 646,647: Fermentation and Biosynthesis of Natural Products (2,2) Topics to be 
discussed and studied in the laboratory in the fermentation area are the biosynthesis 
of secondary metabolites, batch and continuous culture, and microbial degradations 
and transformations. Biosynthetic topics to be presented will be the use of the 
isotopes C, 15 N and 13 C and 3H in elucidation of biosynthetic pathways, regulation 
of secondary metabolism, and stereospecificity and mechanism of enzyme reactions. 
Prerequisites: PCOG 332,442, MCHM 431,432 or the equivalent or by special 
permission of the instructor. 

PCOG 758: Special Problems in Pharmacognosy (1-3) 

PCOG 799: Research in Pharmacognosy Master's Level (1-6) Credit according to 
the amount and quality of work performed. 

PCOG 811,812: Chemotaxonomic and Phytochemical Methodology (4,4) Given in 
alternate years. Two lectures and two laboratories. Prerequisite: approval of 
instructor. A study of powdered vegetable drugs from the chemotaxonomic and 
microchemical standpoint. Emphasis will be placed on the screening of phytochemi- 
cal constituents and their relationship to phytogeny. 

PCOG 841,842: Advanced Pharmacognosy (4,4) Two lectures and two laboratories. 
Prerequisites: PCOG 441,442 or approval of instructor. A study of the major classes of 
phytochemical constituents with special attention given to the problems of isolation, 
identification and biosynthesis of these components. 

PCOG 899: Research in Pharmacognosy Doctoral Level (1-8) 



h 



i 




54 



CAMPUS 
MAP 




BUILDING KEY, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE 



Albed Health Professions Building. 
32 S Greene Street 
Medical Technology, School of 
Pharmacy, Physical Therapy. 
Radiologic Technology classrooms, 
offices, laboratories 
Alpha House, 828 N Eutaw Street 
(off campus) 

Baltimore Union. 621 W Lombard 
Street 

Cafetena. student housing, meeting 
rooms for students and faculty, 
lounges 

Bressler Research Building, 29 S 
Greene Street 

Medical school research laborato- 
ries, Baltimore offices of the univer- 
sity's Board of Regents 
Community Mental Health and Re- 
tardation Center (under construc- 
tion). Fayette and Arch Streets 
The university win use the $12 mil- 
lion-plus facifity jointly with the In- 
ner City Mental Health Program 
and the State Department of Mental 
Hygiene 

Community Pediatric Center. 412 
W Redwood Street (off campus) 
Innovative program of comprehen- 
sive health care for children in 
southwestern health district Feder 
ally funded 

Davidge Hall. 522 W Lombard 
Street 

Built in 1812 and designed by R 
Cany Long, who used the Pantheon 
in Rome as his model The oldest 
building in the nation used continu- 
ously for medical education The 
university's Medical Alumni Associ- 
ation plans to restore the building to 
its original state and open a to the 
public as a medical museum 
Dunning Hall. 636 W Lombard 
Street 

School of Pharmacy classrooms and 
offices Drug manufacturing lab. 
poison information center 



9 Fayette Street Garage, 633 W Fay 
ette Street 

10 Gray Laboratory, 520 Rear W 
Lombard Street 

Medical school offices and laborato- 
ries, Physical Therapy offices. Per- 
sonnel training room 

11 Hayden Hams Hall. 666 W Balti- 
more Street 

School of Dentistry clinics, class- 
rooms, offices Opened in 1970 

12 Health Scences Computer Center, 
610 W Lombard Street 
Computer Center, pharmacy school 
offices and labs, Medical Technol- 
ogy labs. Division of Clinical bivesti 
gation, Office of Student Affairs 

13 Health Sciences Library, 111 S 
Greene Street 

Main library for all professional 
schools except the School of Law 
Includes historical book coDecton 
and computenzed circulation and 
information services 

14 Howard Hall. 660 W Redwood 
Street 

Central Administration offices, med- 
ical school classrooms, offices, labs 

15 Howard Hall Addition, 655 W Bal- 
timore Street 

Medical school classrooms, offices, 
labs 

16 Institute of Psychiatry and Human 
Behavior, 645 W Redwood Street 
(F wing of hospital) 

The medical school's center lor psy- 
chiatric teaching and research as 
well as inpatient and outpatient 

17 Kelly Memonal Building. 650 W. 
Lombard Street 

Headquarters of Maryland Pharma- 
ceutcal Association B Olive Cole 

Museum 



18 Law Building (Lane Hall), 500 W 
Baltimore Street 

School of Law classrooms, offices, 
library 

19 Lombard Building, 511 W Lom- 
bard Street 

Bookstore. University Relations 
Maryland Institute for Emergency 

20 Medicine. 22 S Greene Street 
The first major trauma program in 
the nation, combining multxiiscipfi- 
nary teaching and research with ex- 
pert round-the-clock care for the 
critically ill and injured Many pa- 
tients are brought by state police 
helicopter from all parts of Mary 
land 

Medical School Teaching Facility 

21 (under construction), 10 S Pine 
Street 

Medical Technology Building, 31 S 

22 Greene Street 

Medical school offices, labs 
Mencken House, 1524 Hollins 

23 Street (off campus) 
Methadone Program. 104 N 

24 Greene Street (off campus) 
National Pituitary Agency. 210 W 

25 Fayette Street (off campus) 
Under contract with the National 
Institutes of Health, the University 
of Maryland administers the NPA, 
which is the official agency for col- 
lection and distribution of human 
pituitary hormones for research pur- ■ 
poses 

Newman Center, 712 W Lombard 
2b Street 

Nilsson House, 826 N Eutaw Street 
27 (off campus) 

Parsons Residence Hall. 622 W 
2* Lombard Street 

Pratt Street Garage and Exercise 
29 Facifity (under construction) 



Redwood Hall, 721 W Redwood 
Street 

Division of Alcoholism and Drug 
Abuse offices, clinical areas 
School of Nursing Building. 655 W 
Lombard Street 

Modem classroom and office facifity 
for nursing school, completed in 
1971 

School of Social Work and Admin- 
istration Building. 525 W Redwood 
Street 

Office of the chance Dor School of 
Social Work and Community Plan- 
ning classrooms, offices 
State Medical Examiner's Building, 
111 Penn Street 

Stroke Center. 412 W Redwood 
Street (off campus) 
Temporary Academic Building, 601 
RearW Lombard Street 
School of Social Work and Com- 
munity Planning classrooms, offices 
Tuerk House. 106 N Greene Street 
(off campus) 

Residential facifity for alcoholism 
programs of the University o( Mary- 
land Hospital (Also Alpha and Nib- 
son Houses.) 

University College. 520 W Lom- 
bard Street 

Offers degree and non-degree edu- 
cational programs, Juvenile Law 
Clinic 

University Garage, 701 W Red- 
wood Street 

University of Maryland Hospital, 22 
S Greene Street 

Western Health Clinic. 700 W 
Lombard Street 

Whitehurst Hall, 624 W Lombard 
Street 

Graduate School office, nursing, 
pharmacy, socal work and commu- 
nity planning offices, classrooms. 
Legal Services Clinic. 116 N Paca 
Street 



55 




University of Maryland 
at Baltimore 

This publication was produced by the Office 
of University Relations, 511 W. Lombard Street, 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201, for the School of 
Pharmacy. 



56 












\ / 



V 




UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841 to 1904 



1980-1982 

Catalog and 

129th Announcement 



Volume 52 
Number 1 
April, 1980 



CONTENTS 



Page 

General Information 

Aims and Objectives 2 

History 3 

Degrees 4 

Housing 5 

Academic Regulations 6 

Student Organizations 9 

Honors and Awards 10 

Employment Prospectus 11 

Professional Experience Program 13 

Financial Information 

Fees and Expenses 16 

Financial Aid 16 

Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy Program 

Admissions 22 

Curriculum 23 

Doctor of Pharmacy Program 

Admissions 28 

Curriculum 29 

Courses of Instruction 31 

Graduate Program 

Medicinal Chemistry-Pharmacognosy 40 

Pharmaceutics 43 

Pharmacology-Toxicology 47 

Institutional Pharmacy 50 

Faculty and Administration 53 

Campus Map 58 



GENERAL INFORMATION 




Aims and Objectives 

As the only school of pharmacy in Maryland and as part of the state university, the 
University of Maryland School of Pharmacy accepts definite responsibilities for under- 
graduate, graduate and continuing education of pharmacists and those interested in the 
pharmaceutical sciences, and the conduct of original research to advance scientific and 
professional knowledge. Graduates of the school serve as community, hospital and 
industrial pharmacists and their educational background qualifies them for professional 
service in educational and governmental regulatory or environmental control agencies. 
Pharmacy graudates are uniquely qualified to pursue advanced study in the bio-medical 
and other health-related sciences. Recent developments suggest that the pharmacist has 
become a patient-oriented drug expert. The school accepts this concept of an emerging 
new role of the pharmacist and the curriculum is designed to enable the graduate to 
take a more meaningful part in health care at the institutional and community level. 

In meeting its teaching obligations, the school provides a curriculum and faculty capable 
of offering students an educational experience beyond training for the practice of phar- 
macy. In addition to acquiring the facts and techniques for pharmaceutical practice, 
graduates are able to employ the new advances in the health sciences as they relate to 
the recent trends to meet the growing needs for, and increased quality of, health care. 

The new role of the pharmacist requires training not only in chemistry, physical chemical 
properties, stability and pharmaceutical nature of drugs, but advanced training in clinical 
pharmacy and pharmacology. The School of Pharmacy has modernized its curriculum 
to permit its graduates to play an important part with the physician in drug selection 
and monitoring patient therapy, with early recognition of potential adverse drug effects. 

The aims and objectives of the clinical program in the school include the opportunity 
for interaction with other students and professional people in the Schools of Medicine, 
Dentistry, Nursing, Social Work and Community Planning, and Law. This interaction 
will enhance the opportunities for development of the informational role of the phar- 
macist to bring him closer to the physician as a recognized source of dependable infor- 
mation about drugs and therapeutic agents. Familiarity with the literature and methods 
of information retrieval and distribution are considered indispensible to a modern prac- 
titioner of pharmacy. 

The school accepts its responsibility for recruiting and training programs for disadvan- 
taged students to bring them to the educational level required for the practice of phar- 
macy. Without lowering admission standards or modifying the educational requirements, 
students of these groups within our society can participate in the educational processes 
in order that they can take their professional place in providing health care services. 

The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy has had a long tradition of providing 
outstanding graduate programs and recognizes its obligation to continually strengthen 
and modify them on the basis of the needs of the scientific community and society. A 
strong graduate program is essential to attracting outstanding faculty and to their con- 
tinuing development as scientists and teachers. In addition, a strong graduate program 
fulfills a basic goal of the university in terms of elucidating new knowledge through 
various types of basic and applied research and supplying graduate level scientists to 
government, industry and education. 

One of the major strengths of graduate programs in the various departments of the 
School of Pharmacy is the interrelativity of course work and research interests. Inter- 
disciplinary approaches to graduate education and research are and will continue to be 
stressed. Taking cognizance of the present concerns of graduate education, in terms of 
quality and quantity, the School of Pharmacy will continue to emphasize programs of 
limited size of high quality. Inherent in the activities of the school is the obligation to 
serve as the focal point of leadership for the profession of pharmacy in Maryland, and 
provide expertise to the community in related fields. The school is continuing to meet 
its public responsibilities as an information source, training professionals, and operating 



a drug abuse education program, a pharmacokinetics laboratory, a nuclear pharmacy, 
a dental pharmacy, and a poison information center. In all these areas, it is not only 
fulfilling the needs of the citizens of the state but it is contributing to knowledge in the 
healing arts. 

History 

The first suggestion of a college of pharmacy in Baltimore emanated from William F. 
Fisher, M.D., who established a pharmacy in the city about 1834. He was professor of 
botany in the School of Arts and Sciences, University of Maryland (Baltimore) and in 
1837 was made professor of chemistry in the School of Medicine. Of Dr. Fisher's "plan" 
we know nothing further than that he had formed one and that it met with favor among 
his medical colleagues (a sudden illness prevented his participation in its 1837 execution). 
Also, in 1837, a convention of Eastern Shore physicians in Easton, Maryland made a 
demand on the General Assembly of Maryland for the establishment of a college of 
pharmacy. 

The Maryland College of Pharmacy, the oldest pharmacy school in the South, was 
organized in the City of Baltimore on July 20, 1840 by a progressive group of Baltimore 
physicians (several were associated with the University of Maryland) and apothecaries 
to provide systematic instruction in pharmacy and related sciences. The college, incor- 
porated on January 27, 1841, gave its first lectures in November. 

During a brief association (1844-1847) of the old Maryland College of Pharmacy with 
the old, privately-owned and operated University of Maryland in Baltimore City (north- 
east corner of Lombard and Greene Streets), the first professorship of pharmacy in the 
United States was established. David Stewart, M.D., an alumnus of the School of 
Medicine (1844) was elected professor of pharmacy (1844-1846). 

From 1848-1903, the old college operated as an independent institution at various 
locations in the city. In 1904, the Maryland College of Pharmacy became the Department 
of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland (Baltimore). In 1920, the Baltimore profes- 
sional schools (University of Maryland) merged with Maryland State College (College 
Park) to form the state university. 




From the very beginning, the school has made many noteworthy contributions to the 
advancement of pharmacy. In addition to the first separate professorship in the theory 
and practice of pharmacy (1844), some other firsts include the establishment of a chair 
of analytical chemistry (1872) and an obligatory course in analytical chemistry for the 
pharmacy student. 

Alpheus Phineas Sharp, one of the first graduates from the newly-opened Maryland 
College of Pharmacy, read the first scientific paper before the American Pharmaceutical 
Association in New York City (1855). Merck, Sharp & Dohme can trace its origin to 
the opening of his apothecary shop in Baltimore. 

In 1870, the college called the first convention of representatives of pharmacy schools 
to formulate uniform standards for the graduation of students. The convention was held 
in Baltimore and was the forerunner of the American Association of Colleges of Phar- 
macy. Many of the early pharmaceutical laws enacted by the legislature of the State of 
Maryland were initiated and fostered by the school. 

The school was one of the first in American to give a special course in prescription 
compounding, consisting of both lectures and laboratory work and the first to add a 
separate chair of commercial pharmacy and dispensing (1900). 

Graduate courses were first outlined in 1928 and this inaugurated an era of high caliber 
graduate work which added much to the development and prestige of the school. 

The school was among the first schools of pharmacy to have a full-time pharmacology 
department (1930) and the first laboratory in a pharmacy school for instruction in 
biochemical assays. 

The first accreditation conference of pharmacy schools was held at the University of 
Maryland in 1932. This established the American Council for Pharmaceutical Education. 

The dual efforts of the School of Pharmacy and the Maryland Board of Pharmacy 
resulted in 1970 in a major change in the traditional pharmacy curriculum and internship 
requirements. Maryland became the first state in the nation to eliminate the unstructured 
internship program and replace it with a professional experience program that was 
incorporated in the school's curriculum. 



Accreditation 

The School of Pharmacy is accredited by the American Council on Pharmaceutical 
Education. The school holds membership in the American Association of Colleges of 
Pharmacy. 



Degrees 

The School of Pharmacy offers courses leading to the following degrees: Bachelor of 
Science in Pharmacy, Doctor of Pharmacy. Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy. 
The general procedures to be followed by interested students are set forth in the following 
paragraphs. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy will be conferred upon students who 
have successfully completed the pre-professional program and the three-year profes- 
sional program as outlined later in this bulletin. 

The Doctor of Pharmacy degree will be conferred upon students who have successfully 
completed the pre-professional program, the first two years of the Bachelor of Science 
in Pharmacy Program and the two years of the Pharm.D. Program. 

Candidates for advanced degrees must register in the Graduate School of the University. 
More detailed information is found on page 39 and also in the catalog of The Graduate 
School. 



Housing 

Housing accommodations are available on the Baltimore Campus, 621 West Lombard 

Street. 

For particulars, write: Ms. Elaine Kacmarik, Manager 

The Baltimore Union 

621 West Lombard Street 

Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

Academic Sessions 

The school calendar operates on a three-term basis. The fall term is four months in 
length and is completed prior to the Christmas recess. The winter term is one month 
(January) in length. Its purpose is to allow students to avail themselves of tutorial 
services or elective course on the profesional or UMBC campuses of the University. 
The spring term, four months in length, begins during the first week in February. 

Student Health 

The Baltimore Campus of the university maintains a Student Health Service for a fee 
of $20.00 per annum, payable at registration in September. A student's spouse or child, 
or other members of his family, are not eligible for health care service unless the spouse, 
too, is a student and has paid the fee for herself. At the beginning of the entering year, 
each student will be given a physical examination. 

The Student Health Service facility is located on the first floor of Howard Hall (660 
West Redwood Street), and is open from 8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m., Monday through 
Friday. When the office is closed, students may report to the emergency room of the 
University of Maryland Hospital, if absolutely necessary. If this is a true emergency, 
the health service will pay the emergency room fee. Otherwise, the student will be 
billed. 

All students are required to carry Blue Cross hospitalization insurance or its equivalent. 
In addition, it is recommended that all students be covered by Blue Shield, or its 
equivalent, to cover physicians' and surgeons' fee. 

Additional information regarding the Student Health Service may be obtained in the 
Office of Administration of the School of Pharmacy. 

Correspondence 

All correspondence referring to entrance into the pre-professional program of the school 
should be directed to the accredited junior or senior college having preprofessional 
programs. In the case of the University of Maryland campuses, correspondence should 
be directed to the following: 

College Park: Director of Admissions 

University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742 

University of Maryland Office of Admissions 

Baltimore County Campus: University of Maryland Baltimore County 

5401 Wilkens Avenue 

Catonsville, Maryland 21228 

University of Maryland Director of Admissions 

Eastern Shore Campus: University of Maryland Eastern Shore 

Princess Anne, Maryland 21853 



All correspondence relative to entrance into the professional programs should be ad- 
dressed to the School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 636 West Lombard Street, 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

Honors Programs of the University of Maryland Eastern Shore 
(UMES) 

The University of Maryland, Eastern Shore, in cooperation with the professional schools 
of the University of Maryland at Baltimore (UMAB). has instituted a unique and 
continuing Honors Program for students of great promise and ability who can meet 
rigorous academic standards. The program will include specific pre-professional tracks 
in medicine, dentistry, law, pharmacy, nursing, and social work and community planning. 

The program of study will consist primarily of honors sections in Biology, Chemistry, 
English, Mathematics and Social Sciences. It will also emphasize independent study and 
honors seminars through which students will be expected to explore in depth the various 
academic disciplines. 

Admission to the program will be based on a combination of predictive factors, which 
will include the high school record. SAT scores, interview, a personal statement written 
at the time of the interview and letters of recommendation. In addition, special attention 
will be given to minorities and students from geographical areas traditionally underserved 
by the professions. 

Retention in the honors program will require students to maintain a minimum overall 
grade point average of 3.00 (A = 4.00) with an average of 'B' or better in each honors 
course. 

Graduation from a professional school track of the Honors Program requires that stu- 
dents must meet not only the requirements of the Honors Program but also the admission 
requirements of the particular professional school, as stated in the professional school's 
publications. A student who has graduated from the appropriate professional school 
track in the Honors Program will be admitted to the professional school in the academic 
year immediately following completion of the program. Students who do not meet the 
admissions requirements of the professional schools will graduate with General Honors. 

For additional information, write to the Chairman of the Honors Program Committee, 
University of Maryland-Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, Maryland 21853. 

Academic Regulations 

Each student is responsible for his own progress in his work. His instructors will make 
appointments for a formal conference about his work at his request. Each student is 
assigned an academic counselor from the faculty whom he may consult about personal, 
as well as academic problems. It is imperative that students do not delay the discussion 
of such problems until such time as correction is difficult or impossible. 

Each class has an assigned class advisor who functions not only as as academic counselor 
but serves also to coordinate the overall activities and performances of the class. The 
Dean will be glad to discuss academic and social problems with the students if referred 
by the student's counselor. Appointment may be made through the office secretaries. 

Academic Status Policies 

The academic status of each student is reviewed at the end of each semester by the 
Student Affairs Committee of the Faculty Assembly. The committee is composed of five 
members of the faculty, serving staggered 2-year terms, and one member of the Student 
Government Association. The class advisors and Associate Dean for Administration 
serve as informational sources to the committee. 









The committee recommendations and decisions are subject to approval by the Faculty 
Assembly. 

Students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.000 or higher. Any student 
who fails to maintain this average will be placed on probation during the next semester. 

Any students who have been on probation for one semester and then obtains a probation 
average for a second semester will have the following options — (a) to continue in phar- 
macy school on a reduced load; (2) to elect to continue in school on a full load on the 
understanding that academic dismissal is mandatory should his/her cumulative grade 
point average still be below 2.000 at the end of the following semester. 

Students who fail one or more courses will be subject to being placed on probation or 
academically dismissed, dependent upon an academic review of their record by the 
Student Affairs Committee. 

Student must have a cumulative grade average of not less than 2.000 for entry into the 
required program of the fifth year. 

Students in the fifth year class must maintain a grade average of 2.000 to become eligible 
for graduation. 

Reduced Academic Load Program Policies 

Students who are on reduced load must complete their outstanding coursework on 2 for 
1 basis, i.e., a maximum of two semesters to complete the equivalent of one semester 
on full load. 

An average of 2.000 must be maintained in the courses a student is taking on reduced 
load. Failure to maintain this average in any one semester will result in academic dis- 
missal. 

Students on reduced load must take advantage of tutorial assistance, if available. Stu- 
dents cannot enter their fifth year on reduced load. 

Students in the fourth year on a reduced load may take fifth year electives but no 
required or professional experience program courses. 




Academic Dismissal 

A student may appeal a decision by writing to the chairman of the Student Affairs 
Committee and has the right to present his/her case in person before the committee. 
The decision on the appeal is forwarded by the committee to the Faculty Assembly. If 
the appeal is denied, the student has the right to appeal directly to the Dean, who may 
allow or reject the appeal but must inform the Faculty Assembly of his decision at the 
next assembly meeting. This latter decision is the final decision of the School of Phar- 
macy. 

Academic dismissal is a process which is not completed and does not take effect until 
the student has had an opportunity to exhaust the appeal process. This process must be 
completed before the beginning of the next semester. 



Determination of In-State Status for Admission, Tuition and 
Charge Differential Purposes* 

An initial determination of in-state status for admission, tuition and charge differential 
purposes will be made by the university at the time a student's application for admission 
is under consideration. The determination made at that time and any determination 
made thereafter shall prevail in each semester until the determination is successfully 
challenged prior to the last day available for registration for the forthcoming semester. 
A determination regarding in-state status may be changed for any subsequent semester 
if circumstances, as later defined, warrant redetermination. 



General Policy 

1. It is the policy of the University of Maryland to grant in-state status for admission, 
tuition and charge differential purposes to United States citizens and to immigrant aliens 
lawfully admitted for permanent residence in accordance with the laws of the United 
States, in the following cases: 

a. where a student is financially dependent upon a parent, parents or spouse dom- 
iciled in Maryland for at least six consecutive months prior to the last day 
available for registration for the forthcoming semester 

b. where a student is financially independent for at least the preceding 12 months 
and provided the student has maintained his domicile in Maryland for at least 
six consecutive months immediately prior to the last day available for registration 
for the forthcoming semester 

c. where a student is a spouse or a dependent child of a full-time employee of the 
university 

d. where a student who is a member of the Armed Forces of the United States is 
stationed on active duty in Maryland for at least six consecutive months im- 
mediately prior to the last day available for registration for the forthcoming 
semester, unless such student has been assigned for educational purposes to 
attend the University of Maryland. 

e. where a student is a full-time employee of the University of Maryland. 

2. It is the policy of the University of Maryland to attribute out-of-state status for 
admission, tuition and charge differential purposes in all other cases. 



*A complete statement of this policy is available from the Office of Admissions, Room 132 Howard Hall, 660 
West Redwood Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

8 



3. Each campus of the university will be responsible for making the in-state determination 
for the prospective or enrolled student. 

4. In-state status is lost at any time a financially independent student establishes a 
domicile outside the State of Maryland. If the parent(s) or other persons through whom 
the student has attained in-state status establish a domicile in another state, the student 
shall be assesed out-of-state tuition and charges six months after the out-of-state move 
occurs. 



Appeals 

A student or applicant who disagrees with his classification may request a personal 
interview with the Director of Admissions and Registrations or his designee at which 
time the student will have an opportunity to present any and all evidence he may have 
bearing on his classification and to answer any questions which have been raised about 
his status. 

If the decision is adverse to him, a student may further file a written appeal to the Office 
of the President of the university. The decision of the president of the university or his 
designee shall be final 

The word "domicile" as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent place of abode. 
For the purpose of this rule, only one domicile may be maintained at a given time. 



Student Organizations 

Student Government Alliance (SGA) 

The Student Government Alliance of the School of Pharmacy is an organization of 
undergraduate students established for the purpose of aiding in the internal adminis- 
tration of the School, for organizing all extracurricular programs and activities of the 
student body and for coordinating these programs and activities with those of the faculty 
and administration to foster mutual understanding and cooperation. The Executive 
Council is composed of the president of the Student Government Alliance, presidents 
of the respective classes and one delegate elected from each undergraduate class. 

American Pharmaceutical Association and Maryland Pharmaceutical 
Association Student Chapter 

The purpose of the American Pharmaceutical Association and the Maryland Pharma- 
ceutical Association Student Chapter is to encourage in the broadest and most liberal 
manner the advancement of pharmacy as a science and as a profession in accordance 
with the objectives stated in the Constitution of these two associations, especially in 
fostering education in matters involving pharmacy in all of its branches and its application 
and aiding in promoting the public health and welfare. 

Student National Pharmaceutical Association 

The purposes of this organization are to help the minority student maintain the expected 
academic level; provide the minority student with an organization that can deal with 
problems facing pharmacy and pharmacists in this country; plan, organize, supplement, 
coordinate, and execute comprehensive programs to improve the health, education, and 
social environment of minority groups in Maryland. Although its membership is not 
limited to minority students, the SNPHA chapter hopes to provide the health oriented 
minority student with greater opportunity to achieve greater self-awareness and a larger 
representation in the School of Pharmacy and to make the community more aware of 
the minority groups health problems. 



Rho Chi Honorary Pharmaceutical Society 

Omicron Chapter of Rho Chi, national honorary pharmaceutical society, was established 
at the University of Maryland in 1930. Charters for chapters of this organization are 
granted only to groups in schools or colleges who are members in good standing of the 
American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy- Eligibility for membership in the Society 
is based on high attainment in scholarship, character, personality and leadership. 

Honors and Awards 

University Scholarship Honors 

Final honors for excellence in scholarship are awarded to not more than one-fifth of the 
graduating class in the School of Pharmacy, the honors designations are listed in the 
commencement program and are recorded on the recipient's diploma. 

To be eligible for honors, pharmacy students must complete at least two academic years 
of resident work at Baltimore applicable to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Phar- 
macy with an average of B (3.0) or higher. Those in the first tenth of the class will 
graduate with High Honors and those in the second tenth of the class with Honors. 

The School of Pharmacy Gold Medal 

Gold Medal For General Excellence 

A gold medal is awarded annually to the candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Pharmacy who has attained the highest general average, provided that this average 
is not below the grade of 'B'. 

Certificates of Honor 

Honorable mention is made annually of the first three students of the graduating class 
having the highest general averages, provided these averages do not fall below the grade 
of 'B\ 

Only courses taken at the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore are considered in awarding 
these honors. 

The L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize 

The late L. S. Williams left a trust fund, the income of which is awarded annually by 
the Faculty Assembly of the School of Pharmacy to the student having the highest 
general average throughout the course in practical and dispensing pharmacy. 

The Andrew G. DuMez Medal 

In memory of Dr. Andrew G. DuMez, late dean and professor of pharmacy at the 
School of Pharmacy, Mrs. DuMez provided for a gold medal to be awarded annually 
by the Faculty Assembly to a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 
for superior proficiency in pharmacy. 

The Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize 

In appreciation of assistance which the Maryland College of Pharmacy extended to him 
as a young man, Mr. Conrad L. Wich provided a fund, the income from which is awarded 
annually by the Faculty Assembly to the fifth year student who has done exceptional 
work throughout the course in pharmacognosy. 

Dr. and Mrs. Frank J. Slama Award 

In memory of Dr. Frank J. Slama, late professor of pharmacognosy at the School of 
Pharmacy, Mrs. Slama has provided for an annual award by the Faculty Assembly to 
a fifth year student for superior work in the field of biopharmacognosy. 

10 



The William Simon Memorial Prize 

In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, for thirty years a professor of Chemistry in the 
School of Pharmacy, a gold medal is awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly to a 
candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy who has done superior 
work in the field of practical and analytical chemistry. The recipient must stand high in 
all subjects. In recommending a student for the prize, the professor of chemistry is 
guided in his judgment of the student's ability to observation and personal contact as 
well as by grades. 

The Wagner Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence Prize 

In memory of her late husband, Mr. Manuel B. Wagner, and her late son, Mr. Howard 
J. Wagner, both alumni of the School of Pharmacy, Mrs. Sadie S. Wagner and her 
daughter, Mrs Phyllis Wagner Brill, have provided a fund, the income of which is 
awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly to a fifth year student for meritorous achieve- 
ment in pharmaceutical jurisprudence. 

The John F. Wannenwetsch Memorial Prize 

In memory of her late brother, Dr. John F. Wannenwetsch, a distinguished alumnus of 
the School of Pharmacy, Miss Mary H. Wannenwetsch has provided a fund, the income 
of which is to be used for a prize to be awarded to the graduating student majoring in 
general pharmacy who has exhibited exceptional performance and promise in the practice 
of community pharmacy. 

The Kappa Charter, Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity Prize, awarded to a senior student 
for proficiency in pharmacology. 

The Epsilon Alumnae Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma-Cole Award, to a senior 
student for proficiency in pharmacy administration. 

The Maryland Society for Hospital Pharmacists Award, to a senior student who 
shows promise in the area of hospital pharmacy. 

The Frank J. Slama Award by the School's Alumni Association, to a graduating 
student who has excelled in extracurricular activities. 

The Maryland Pharmaceutical society Award, to outstanding senior minority stu- 
dents. 

Attrition Rate — B. S. in Pharmacy Program 

Over the past two years the attrition rate experienced at the School of Pharmacy has 
been 8.1%. This includes both academic dismissals and voluntary withdrawals from the 
program. 

For the Classes of 1978 and 1979: 

Admitted 186 100.0% 

Graduated 

Still in Program 

Dismissed/Withdrew 

This indicates a slight improvement over the Class of 1974 which experienced a rate of 
13.2%. 

Employment Prospectus 

Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy Graduates 

Nationally, it is felt that the supply of professionally educated pharmacists is at, or very 
near, the level required to effectively serve the current demand for traditional phar- 
maceutical services. 

11 



52 


81.7% 


19 


10.2% 


15 


8.1% 



The current rise in college of pharmacy enrollments has led to considerable concern 
within academia and the profession. An analysis of a recent manpower study (1975) 
done by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy indicated that only 0.3 per 
cent of 102,218 pharmacists were classified as unexplained unemployed. Even in the 
small group, disability may contribute to their unemployed status. 

In Maryland, a 1976 survey of graduates revealed that of the approximately 645 replies, 
none reported that they were unemployed. Other information of importance to an 
applicant considering pharmacy are reported in Tables I and II. 



Table 1 








Income Information: Graduates of the School of 


Pharmacy by Age Group 




(N = 102) 




(N = 637) 


Income 


20-29 Age Group 


All Age Groups 


Less than $10,000 


\y ( 




7% 


10,000-14,999 


5 




5 


15,000-19,999 


50 




27 


20,000-24,999 


28 




33 


25,000-29,999 


4 




14 


30,000 or more 


1 




14 




100% 




100% 




12 



Table II 






Type of Practice: Graduates of the School of Pharmacy 






(N = 102) 


(N = 644) 




20-29 Age Group 


All Age Groups 


Community Pharmacy 






Independent 


28% 


38% 


Community Pharmacy 






Chain 


22 


24 


Hospital Pharmacy 


37 


17 


Clinical Pharmacy 


1 


1 


Other 


12 


15 


Combination of above 




5 




100% 


100% 



The files of the school's placement service, as of January 1st, 1979, indicate that a 
number of jobs are still available; 10 full-time community and hospital jobs and 6 part- 
time positions remain unfilled. An impression of the job market is that jobs are available 
but graduates may have to take second or third choice positions more often than in past 
years. 

Doctor of Pharmacy Graduates 

Graduates of the Doctor of Pharmacy program have a variety of employment opportunities. 
Graduates have been employed as clinical pharmacists in private community hospitals 
and clinics, hospitals affiliated with academic health centers and mental health facilities. 
These opportunities have been both national and local. Graduates have also been hired 
as clinical pharmacy faculty members in schools of pharmacy. Because of the advanced 
clinical nature of the program, graduates usually are more than competitive with grad- 
uates of other programs. It is usually recommended that graduates who desire academic 
faculty positions or research oriented positions do some type of post-doctoral training 
in the form of either a residency or fellowship. 

The Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) graduates of the University of Maryland have 
been employed as follows: 





In Maryland Out-of-State 


Total 


Fellowship 


2 





2 


Residency 


2 


1 


3 


Private Hospital 


4 





4 


Ambulatory (Faculty) 


1 


1 


2 


Ambulatory (Private Practice) 





1 


1 


Academic Affiliated Hospital 


2 


2 


4 


Poison Information (Faculty) 


1 


1 


2 


Research (Industry) 





1 


1 



Starting salaries range from $20,000 to $25,000 per year depending on geographic area. 

The Professional Experience Program 

The Professional Experience Program (P.E.P.) of the University of Maryland School 
of Pharmacy is designed to prepare a student for the professional practice of pharmacy 
by means of a structured program of externship training, supervised by the School of 
Pharmacy and approved by the State Board of Pharmacy. The student-extern receives 
no pay for the time spent in practice but does receive academic credit and must fulfill 
specific education requirements during the Professional Experience Program (P.E.P.). 

13 



Registration and Licensure Requirement of the Maryland Board of 
Pharmacy 

Students enrolling in the School of Pharmacy shall, within 30 days, file with the Secretary 
of the Maryland Board of Pharmacy an application for registration as a student of 
pharmacy. The fee for this is one dollar. The students are required to submit sworn 
statements of all internship experiences to the board upon their request. The Board 
recognizes the six-month professional experience program of the school as satisfying its 
internship requirements. 

Any person of good moral character, who shall present satisfactory evidence to the 
Maryland board of Pharmacy that he or she has had at least four years standard high 
school training or its equivalent, and is a graduate of a reputable school or college of 
pharmacy approved by said Board and accredited by the American Council on Phar- 
maceutical Education and the Board shall adopt the approved list as published on July 
1st of each year, subject to amendment, and who after examination by the said Board 
be deemed competent, shall be registered as a pharmacist and be given a certificate of 
such registration, provided, however, that an internship program to be regulated by said 
board be served. Such persons shall make application to the secretary of said board, at 
least 10 days before any stated meeting of the board and shall pay to the said board fee 
of $40. 

For further information, please contact the secretary of the Maryland Board of Phar- 
macy, 201 West Preston Street, Baltimore. Maryland 21201. 



14 






FINANCIAL INFORMATION 




15 



Fees and Expenses 
Baltimore Campus 

1979-80 Academic Year 

Per Semester 
Tuition— In-State (B.S. Program) $ 335.00 

(Pharm.D. Program) 445.00 

Out-of-State (B.S. Program) 1215.00 

(Pharm.D. Program) 1297.00 

Tuition— Part-time undergraduate per credit (8 credits or less) 38.00 

Instructional Resources Fee (Full-time) 16.00 

Instructional Resources Fee (Part-time) 8.00 

Supporting Facilities Fee (Full-time) 30.00 

Supporting Facilities Fee (Part-time) 6.00 

Student Activities Fee (Full and Part-time) 15.00 

Student Health Fee (Full-time) 10.00 

Student Health Fee (Part-time) 4.00 

Health Insurance (Blue Cross)* 

One Person 105.96 

Two Persons 197.76 

Family 264.24 

Clinical Clerkship Fee (Fifth Year and Pharm.D.) 75.00 

Dormitory Fee 480.50 

* Student Health Care Program. Health insurance is required of all full-time professional schools (nine or more 
semester hours) in addition to the Student Health Fee. A student with equivalent insurance coverage must 
provide proof of such membership to his dean at the time of registration and obtain a hospital insurance 
waiver. 

The University of Maryland at Baltimore. Health Care Program for its student body consists of the following: 
Blue Cross, Blue Shield. Diagnostic and Major Medical coverage. Additional information concerning the 
program may be obtained from the Student Health Office. 



Other Fees and Expenses 

Application Fee (non-returnable) $ 15.00 

Books and Supplies, approximately 175.00-250.00 

Change in Registration Fee (after first week) 5.00 

Deposit upon acceptance for admission (non-returnable) 50.00 

Graduation Fee (to be paid in February of the Fifth Year) 15.00 

Late Registration Fee 20.00 

Matriculation Fee (new students) 15.00 

Special Examination Fee 5.00 

Professional Liability Insurance Fee* 9.35 

The university reserves the right to make such changes in fees and other changes as may be found necessary, 
although every effort will be made to keep the cost to the student as low as possible. 

'during PEP. and clinical experience 

Financial Aid 

Financial assistance from several sources is available to qualified needy students who 
are entering and have been admitted to the professional pharmacy program at the 
Baltimore City campus (UMAB). 

Prime reliance is placed on the student, the student's family and other sources outside 
of the University to meet educational costs. When these sources are inadequate, Uni- 
versity financial aid is available. 

16 



FINANCIAL AID RESOURCES ADMINISTERED AND AWARDED THROUGH UMAB 

College Work-Study — Federal program with awards made to support part-time em- 
ployment on or off campus for periods for which the student is registered. 

Dean's Scholarships — Grants primarily for minority and disadvantaged students who 
need not be residents of Maryland. However, Maryland residents may also participate 
in the program. 

Desegregation Grants — The School of Pharmacy offers grants to minority and disad- 
vantaged students who are residents of the State of Maryland. These grants are awarded 
to full-time students in good academic standing and who demonstrate financial need. 
Grants vary in amount depending on the other resources available to students and the 
direct educational expenses projected for a given academic year. 

Health Professions Loans — Federal program of loans equal to tuition and fees plus 
$2500 annually. The loan bears an interest charge of 7%. 

State of Maryland Grants— The School of Pharmacy offers grants to minority and 
disadvantaged students who are residents of the State of Maryland. These grants are 
awarded to full-time students in good academic standing and who demonstrate financial 
need. Grants vary in amount depending on the other resources available to students 
and the direct educational expenses projected for a given academic year. 

Health Professions Student Scholarship Program— The Public Health Service Act 
as amended under the Health Manpower Training Act of 1971 has a provision for 
granting annual scholarships, not exceeding $3,500 to qualified students of exceptional 
financial need who require such financial assistance to pursue a course of study. The 
School of Pharmacy is participating in this financial aid program for students who are 
on a full-time basis and in good standing in the professional program. In determining 
and establishing financial status and need for scholarship aid, it will be necessary to 
assess all other financial resources available and the expenses of education the student 
will incur. Financial resources which should be assessed include the assistance available 
from parents or guardians; the student's own and, if applicable, his/her spouse's earnings, 
savings and other financial resources; support from other scholarships and private grants 
administered by the School of Pharmacy; aid under the Health Professions Student Loan 
Program; and support available from other sources such as prizes, other scholarships 
or loans and veterans' benefits. 




17 



Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants— Federal program for students with 
exceptional need; this grant must be matched by another institutional award equal to 
or greater than the amount of the grant. 

School of Pharmacy Private Endowments and Gifts— Scholarships/grants are avail- 
able from the following: 

The Charles Caspari, Jr. Memorial Scholarship— -In memory of Professor Charles 
Caspari, Jr., former dean of the School of Pharmacy, a number of his friends and 
alumni have made an endowment for a scholarship. 

The H. J. (Jack) Custis, Jr. Memorial Scholarship Fund— In memory of H. J. (Jack) 
Custis, Jr., Class of 1951, a fund has been established for the purpose of awarding 
scholarships on the basis of reasonable need and academic ability to students in the 
professional program on the Baltimore Campus of the School of Pharmacy. Students 
eligible for the Custis Memorial Scholarship shall be residents of one of the nine 
Eastern Shore, Maryland Counties. The amount of each Custis Memorial schol- 
arship shall not exceed $300 in any one year. The recipient of each scholarship 
awarded shall be determined by the Dean of the School of Pharmacy and the 
president of the Eastern Shore Pharmaceutical Society. 

The J. Gilbert Joseph Scholarship— In memory of her brother, J. Gilbert Joseph, 
a former student of the School of Pharmacy, the late Miss Jeanette Joseph provided 
a generous bequest to endow scholarships to be awarded to qualified students who 
have maintained a superior scholastic average and who are in need of financial 
assistance. 

The A. M. Lichtenstein Scholarship — In memory of her husband, A. M. Lichten- 
stein, distinguished alumnus of the School of Pharmacy Class of 1889, the late Mrs. 
Francina Freese Lichtenstein bequeathed a sum of money to endow a scholarship 
to be awarded annually to a resident of Allegany County, Maryland. The recipient 
of the award is to be selected on the basis of financial need, character and schol- 
arship. 

The Frederick William Koenig Memorial Scholarship — In memory of her husband, 
Frederick William Koenig, a practicing pharmacist for fifty years, the late Mrs. 
Valeria R. Koenig has bequeathed a sum of money to endow a scholarship to be 
awarded annually. The recipient of the award will be selected on the basis of 
financial need, character and scholarship. 

The Prince Georges-Montgomery County Pharmaceutical Association Scholarship — 
The Prince Georges-Montgomery County Pharmaceutical Association provides a 
scholarship in the amount of $200 to be awarded to a student who has maintained 
a superior academic record and who is in need of financial assistance. 

The Rose Hendler Memorial Fund — L. Manuel Hendler and family have established 
a loan fund in memory of Mrs. Rose Hendler for needy students. This fund is 
available to qualified students of the Fourth and Fifth years and loans therefrom 
are made upon the recommendation of the Dean. 

The Benjamin Schoenfeld Memorial Pharmacy Loan Fund — The family of Mr. Ben- 
jamin Schoenfeld has established a loan fund as a memorial to him. This fund is 
available to qualified needy students. Loans from the fund are made upon the 
recommendation of the Dean. 

The Isadore M. and Irene R. Fischer Memorial Scholarship Fund — The families of 
Isadore M. and Irene R. Fischer have provided a scholarship fund to support a 
professional or graduate student demonstrating academic excellence in the educa- 
tional programs of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. While financial 
need can be a consideration, the scholarship support can be made solely on academic 
performance. 

18 



The Burroughs-Wellcome Fund — An annual donation in the name of community 
and hospital pharmacists for short-term loans to needy students in the School of 
Pharmacy. 

The Charles L. Henry Memorial Scholarship — The Charles L. Henry Memorial 
Scholarship Fund has been provided for Pharm.D. students in the School of Phar- 
macy requiring financial assistance. 

NON-UNIVERSITY FINANCIAL AID RESOURCES 

Basic Educational Opportunity Grants— Awards for undergraduate students who have 
not previously earned a baccalaureate degree; awards based on financial need; the 
amount of the award may range up to $1800. 

Maryland State Scholarships — Students who have not yet received a baccalaureate 
degree and who are residents of Maryland may apply for House of Delegates Schol- 
arships, General State Scholarships, and Senatorial Scholarships. 

Students who have previously been recipients of any of the above mentioned scholarships 
on other campuses and still have remaining eligibility for continuance of the scholarships 
are advised to contact the Maryland State Scholarship Board for transfer of these schol- 
arships to UMAB. 

Maryland State Professional Scholarships—Students accepted for or already enrolled 
in the professional pharmacy program at Baltimore (UMAB) may apply for these schol- 
arships: 

Maryland State Scholarship Board 
2100 Guilford Avenue 
Baltimore, Maryland 21218 
Phone: (301) 383-4095 



0tffflMVSfW$ 




19 



Guaranteed Student Loan Program— In Maryland, the Maryland Higher Education 
Loan Corporation Program permits undergraduates to borrow up to $2500 annually. As 
lenders have limited funds for this program, students are advised to contact thier lending 
institutions at the earliest possible date. 

Student Veterans 

Incoming new students (those accepting offers of admission to the School of Pharmacy) 
who continue to have eligibility for educational benefits in accord with the laws and 
regulations of the Veterans Administration, are advised to forward as promptly as 
possible a completed VA Form 22-1995 (Request for change of Program or Place of 
Training). Those Veterans who have not used any of their VA educational benefits 
should forward a completed VA Form 22-1990 (Application for Program of Education 
or Training) and a copy of DD 214 (Separation Papers). 
Mail the completed forms to: Office of Administration 

University of Maryland School of Pharmacy 

636 West Lombard Street 

Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



20 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
IN PHARMACY PROGRAM 




21 



The three-year program as offered on the Baltimore Campus has been divided into two 
parts, the first two years of the program being a basic science sequence, and the final 
year primarily clinical in design. By dividing the program in this manner, it is hoped 
that students, upon completion of the two-year basic science program, will make career 
option selections which will enable them to move into the clinical year to receive a B. 
S. in Pharmacy and fulfill requirements for licensure or move into the Doctor of Phar- 
macy program. During the program, students complete a program consisting of 72 credits 
of required courses, 14 credits of Professional Experience (PEP) and a minimum of 14 
credits of elective courses for a total of at least 100 credits. 

The clinical year consists of six months of professional experience or clinical clerkship 
(14 credits) plus 7 credits of required course work and 1 1 credits of professional electives. 
The required course work includes courses in therapeutics, pharmacy practice and clinical 
toxicology. The six months of professional experience are divided into three months of 
required time plus three months of elective time. The three-month required clerkship 
is divided equally between community pharmacy, institutional pharmacy and patient 
care. The final three months are elective in that area that the student desires to follow 
as a career. The community practice segment will be served in a community pharmacy 
under a preceptor who has faculty rank as a clinical instructor in the school. This 
pharmacist is selected by the school and his practice must achieve certain requirements 
to be accepted. The student follows a structured program in the preceptor's practice, 
and his performance is evaluated by both the preceptor and the school. The institutional 
practice centers around distributive functions in hospitals ranging from the University 
of Maryland Hospital and The Johns Hopkins Hospital to community hospitals through- 
out the state. The segment of patient care is hospital experience time in patient care 
areas. Students will be involved in developing drug histories of patients, overseeing drug 
administration to the patient, noting adverse drug reactions, going on rounds with 
medical staff, providing drug information to the physician and other specialized con- 
ference activities. This program is under the supervision of the clinical pharmacy service 
which has been established in the university hospital. Other patient care areas would 
involve the counseling of patients in the out-patient clinic, the dental clinic and other 
patient care facilities in Baltimore. Completion of the professional experience program 
will be accepted by the Maryland Board of Pharmacy as meeting the internship require- 
ments necessary for licensure. 

Admission 

Students of all races, colors and creeds are equally admissible. It is the objective of the 
University of Maryland, Baltimore City Campus to enroll students with diversified 
backgrounds in order to make the educational experience more meaningful for each 
student. 

Candidates seeking admission to the School of Pharmacy in Baltimore should write to 
the Dean's Office, University of Maryland, 636 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, Mary- 
land 21201. Applicants wishing advice on any problem relative to their application should 
communicate with the above office. 

Prerequisites for Application Consideration 

Applicants must present evidence of having successfully completed the required pre- 
professional program, or be enrolled in the final semester leading to completion of that 
program. In general, the pre-professional course requirements are: 

English 6 credits 

Math (precalculus/Calculus I) 6-7 credits 

Zoology or Biology 4 credits 

General Chemistry 8 credits 

Organic Chemistry 8-10 credits 

Physics 8 credits 

40-43 credits 

22 



Plus 17-20 credits in Humanities, Social Sciences and Free Electives. In addition, ap- 
plicants must have taken the Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT) and had the 
test results submitted along with the other records required by the application. 

Application Selection Procedures 

An admissions subcommittee consisting of faculty members and representatives of the 
student body consider all applicants meeting the required standards. The committee 
considers the applicant's academic achievement, extracurricular activities, personal char- 
acteristics as determined by interviews by the committee members, and the scores of 
the Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT). Academic achievement and/ or high 
scores in the PCAT do not in themselves ensure acceptance. Also of concern to the 
committee are the professional and social awareness, communication skills, integrity, 
maturity, and motivation of the applicant. It should be pointed out to applicants that 
while a minimal QPA of 2.25 is required for application consideration, the average OPA 
of entering students is approximately 3.0. This fact, coupled with the multiple appli- 
cations for each available position in the entering class, gives those applicants with 
QPA's below 2.5 extremely low probabilities for admission. 

Application Deadline 

All applications must be received by the Admissions Office by April 1st and all supportive 
records necessary for completion of the total application received by May 1st. It is the 
responsibility of the applicant to insure that all these records are filed with the Admissions 
Office. 



Curriculum 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY 

(First Professional Year) 

Title and Number of Course 



THIRD YEAR 



FALL SESSION 


MCPG 


331 ( 


MCPG 


431 1 


PCOL 


331 , 


PPAS 


331 


PHAR 


333 ] 



Quantitative Pharmaceutical Analysis 
Biochemistry I 
Anatomy & Physiology I 
Introduction to Pharmacy & Health Care 
Basic Pharmaceutics I 

Total Credits 



Hours/Week 
Lee. Lab. Credit 



16 



WINTER SESSION 

Optional electives available 



SPRING SESSION 

MCPG 432 Biochemistry II 

MCPG 433 Biochemistry II Laboratory 

MCPG 332 Pharmaceutical Microbiology I 

PCOL 332 Anatomy & Physiology II 

PHAR 334 Basic Pharmaceutics II 

PPAS 332 Medical Care Organization 



Total Credits 



17 



FOURTH YEAR (Second Professional Year) 
FALL SESSION 

PPAS 342 Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence 
MCPG 343 Pharmaceutical Microbiology II 
MCPG 441 General Pharmacognosy I 



23 



Principles of Drug Action I: 

MCPG 443 Chemistry of Medicinal Products I 
PCOL 441 Pharmacodynamics I 
PHAR 441 Biopharmaceutics 



Total Credits 



WINTER SESSION 

Optional electives and interprofessional courses available 

SPRING SESSION 

MCPG 442 General Pharmacognosy II 

Principles of Drug Action II: 
PPAS 341 Technical & Behavioral Aspects of Pharmacy 

Practice 
MCPG 444 Chemistry of Medicinal Products II 
PCOL 442 Pharmacodynamics II 
PCLN 346 Pathophysiology 

Electives (Select One): 

PHMY 342 Applied Calculus 
PPAS 344 Pharmacy Management I 
DEPT 448 Special Projects 

Total Credits 



3 
4 

18 



17 or 18 




" 



^ri 




24 



FIFTH YEAR (Third Professional Year) 

SUMMER SESSION (June-August) 

Professional Experience (Clinical Clerkship) 
PPAS 368 Community Practice - - 2 

PPAS 369 Institutional Practice 2 

Total Credits 4 

FALL SESSION 

Required Courses: 
PCLN 461 Therapeutics 6-3 

PPAS 450 Pharmacy Practice 4 2 

PCLN 451 Clinical Toxicology 4 2 

Electives (Select One): 
PPAS 454 Institutional Pharmacy I 4-2 

PPAS 351 Community Pharmacy Management II 4 2 

DEPT 448 Special Projects Var. 2-3 

Total Credits 9 or 10 

Professional Experience (Clinical Clerkship) 

November-January (Select two courses in 3-month period) 

PCLN 362 Patient Care I 4 

PPAS 368 Community Practice 2 

PPAS 369 Institutional Practice - 2 

PPAS 363 Special Studies 2 

Total Credits 4 or 6 

Total Credits for Summer and Fall Session: 17-19 

WINTER SESSION (January) 

Optional electives and interprofessional courses 

SPRING SESSION 

Electives (Select sufficient electives to total 14 credits of electives for the professional 
program) plus two of the following P.E.P. units: 
PCLN 362 Patient Care I 4 

PPAS 368 Community Practice - 2 

PPAS 369 Institutional Practice - - 2 

PPAS 363 Special Studies - 2 

SECTION A (February-March) 

MCPG 449 Special Group Studies (Clinical Chemistry) var. 1 

MCPG 452 Antibiotics 

PCOL 358 Drug Abuse Education 

PHAR 451 Adv. Pharm. Formulations & Compounding 

PHAR 452 Adv. Pharm. Formulations & Compounding Lab. 

PPAS 352 Community Pharmacy Management III 

PPAS 353 Non-Prescription Drugs 

PPAS 354 Parapharmaceuticals 

PPAS 455 Institutional Pharmacy II 

PPAS 457 Parenteral Therapy 

PPAS 460 Pharmacy & Therapeutics Colloquium 

DEPT 448 Special Projects 



25 



4 


- 


2 


var. 


- 


1-3 


4 


- 


2 


- 


6 


1 


4 


- 


2 


4 


- 


2 


4 


- 


2 


4 


- 


2 


4 


- 


2 


2 


- 


1 


- 


var. 


1-3 



SECTION B (April-May) 

MCPG 452 Antibiotics 

MCPG 454 Diagnostic & Clinical Microbiology 

PCOL 358 Drug Abuse Education 

PHAR 451 Adv. Pharm. Formulations & Compounding 

PHAR 452 Adv. Pharm. Formulations & Compounding Lab. 

PHAR 453 Cosmetics & Dermatological Preparations 

PHAR 456 Cosmetics & Dermatological Preparations Lab. 

PHAR 464 Introduction to Industrial Pharmacy 

PPAS 352 Community Pharmacy Management III 

PPAS 354 Parapharmaceuticals 

PPAS 355 History of Pharmacy 

PPAS 356 Health Economics 

PPAS 460 Pharmacy & Therapeutics Colloquium 

DEPT 448 Special Projects 

Minimum number of credits to complete the Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy Program 



4 


- 


2 


4 


6 


3 


var. 


- 


1-3 


4 


- 


2 


- 


6 


- 


4 


- 


2 


- 


6 


1 


- 


- 


2 


4 


- 


2 


4 


- 


2 


2 


- 


1 


4 


- 


2 


2 


- 


1 


- 


var. 


1-3 



100 



26 



DOCTOR OF PHARMACY PROGRAM 




27 



This six-year program is designed to complement and enhance, not replace, the bac- 
calaureate program and allows the student, as recommended by the American Council 
on Pharmaceutical Education and the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, 
to receive the Pharm.D. as a first professional degree. 



Goal 

To provide advanced education and training in necessary scientific and clinical knowl- 
edges, assured comprehension, skills, and attitudes which will enable graduates to op- 
timally function as a therapeutic consultant, a direct provider of health care in situations 
requiring active monitoring of therapeutic and toxic drug effects, a patient educator and 
a health professional educator in the clinical use of therapeutic agents. 



Competency Objectives 

The Doctor of Pharmacy graduate will be able to: 

1 define and assess patients' therapeutic problems utilizing selective clinical data, 
including patient history and physical assessment skills; 

2 define achievable therapeutic objectives and identify and monitor discriminating 
subjective and objective points of therapy; 

3 identify appropriate drug variables and appropriate patient variables and integrate 
these variables into optimal therapeutic regimen design; 

4 identify toxic end points of drug use and actively monitor these end points to 
prevent development of predictable toxic responses; 

5 detect, assess and appropriately manage adverse drug reactions; 

6 identify, assess and provide information in the management of toxic ingestion and 
play an active role in poison prevention; 

7 assume primary responsibility in ambulatory chronic disease management and 
primary health care; 

8 conduct implicit and explicit therapeutic audits in areas of both ambulatory and 
inpatient care; 

9 function as a clinical health professional educator with ability to define specific 
educational objectives, utilize educational methodologies and utilize appropriate 
student evaluation techniques; 

10 identify patient education needs and develop and implement patient education 
plans; 

11 retrieve, evaluate and interpret appropriate scientific and clinical literature to 
provide clinically relevant drug information. 



Admissions 

Pharmacy students who will have completed the fourth year of a five-year program in 
an accredited school of pharmacy and individuals who have been awarded the B.S. or 
advanced degrees in pharmacy may apply to the Doctor of Pharmacy Program. 

Prior to admission, each applicant should complete or plan to complete a pre-pharmacy 
and professional program equivalent to the first four years of the University of Maryland 
B. S. in Pharmacy program, including courses in pathophysiology and Calculus II. 

In general, a 3.0 average (B) in all courses in the professional program will be a minimum 
requirement. Personal interviews will be required of all qualified applicants. Other meth- 
ods of application evaluation (such as tests and letters of recommendation) will be 
applied equally to all applicants when such methods are deemed necessary by the Ad- 
missions Subcommittee. Class size is currently limited to six students, no more than two 
of which will be from outside the State of Maryland. 

28 



Application Deadline 

Applications must be received by the Pharm.D. Admissions Subcommittee by January 
1st and all supportive records necessary for completion of the total application received 
by January 15th. Notifications of acceptance will be made by March 15th. Applications 
may be obtained by writing to the Dean's Office, School of Pharmacy, University of 
Maryland, 636 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

The two-year Pharm.D. Program is predicated upon a student completing, before ad- 
mission, at least the two-year basic science sequence of the B.S. in Pharmacy Program. 
The Pharm.D. program combines an increased education in basic pharmaceutical science 
with advanced clinical training. 

A summary of the Pharm.D. graduation requirements include: 



Course Credits: 
Third & Fourth Years 
Fifth & Sixth Years 
Clinical and Professional Experience 
Elective Credits 



65 

27 
53 



Total 



153 



Curriculum 

DOCTOR OF PHARMACY PROGRAM 

THIRD & FOURTH YEARS 

FIFTH YEAR (Third Professional Year) 

SUMMER SESSION (June-August): 

PPAS 368 Community Practice 
PPAS 369 Institutional Practice 



Credits 

2 

2 



Total Credits 



FALL SESSION 

PCLN 461 Therapeutics (Sept. -Oct.) 

PCLN 451 Clinical Toxicology (Sept. -Oct.) 

PHAR 502 Advanced Biopharmaceutics 

PDIA 520 Physical Diagnosis 

PCOL 740 Drug Action Conference I 

PCLN 570 Clinical Clerkship I (Nov.) 

PCLN 578 Clinical Clerkship II (Dec.) 

PCLN 462 Statistics in Clinical Investigation 



3 

2 
2 
1 
2 
4 
3 
1_ 

Total Credits 18 



WINTER SESSION (January): 

PCLN 578 Clinical Clerkship II 





Total Credits 


3 


'RING 

PDIA 
PCOL 
PPAS 
PCLN 
PCLN 
PHAR 


SESSION 

520 Physical Diagnosis 

471 Drug Action Conference II 

470 Health Education Seminar 

578 Clinical Clerkship II 

579 Clinical Clerkship III 

475 Clinical Pharmacokinetics Seminar 

Total Credits 
Total Third Professional Year Credits 


1 
2 
2 
9 
3 
1 




18 
43 



29 



SIXTH YEAR (Fourth Professional Year) 
SUMMER SESSION (June-August) 

PCLN 579 Clinical Clerkship III 
Elective 



FALL SESSION 

PCLN 580 Clinical Therapeutics Seminar I 
PPAS 582 Clinical Teaching Seminar I 
PCLN 579 Clinical Clerkship III 
PPAS 569 Institutional Practice II 
Elective 



WINTER SESSION (January) 

PCLN 579 Clinical Clerkship III 



SPRING SESSION 

PCLN 582 Clinical Therapeutics Seminar II 

PPAS 583 Clinical Teaching Seminar II 

PHAR 485 Advanced Pharmaceutics 

PCLN 579 Clinical Clerkship III 

PCLN 463 Drug Induced Diseases 
Electives 

Total credits for Fourth Professional Year 

Minimum number of credits to complete Doctor of Pharmacy Program 

Electives may be selected from those courses offered as electives in the final professional 
year of the B.S. in Pharmacy program and will be selected by the students in consultation 
with their advisement and counseling committees. 





6 

2 


Total Credits 


8 




1 
1 
9 
2 
2-3 


Total Credits 


15-16 




3 


Total Credits 


3 




1 

1 
2 
9 
2 
2-3 


Total Credits 
gram 


17-18 
43 
153 




30 



Courses of Instruction 

MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY-PHARMACOGNOSY 
(MCPG) 

Staff Blomster (Chairman). Callery, Krikorian, Rosier, M. Speedie, Spitznagle, Wright. 
Zenker 

MCPG 331. Quantitative Pharmaceutical Analysis (4). Fall term, three lectures, one 
laboratory. A study of the principles of quantitative analysis with special emphasis on 
techniques applicable to the separation and analysis of compounds and products of 
pharmaceutical interest. 

MCPG 332. Pharmaceutical Microbiology I (3). Spring term, two lectures and one 
laboratory. Prerequisites: Organic chemistry and MCPG 431. This course is designed 
specifically for pharmacy students and includes introductory studies on the practical and 
theoretical considerations of bacteria, molds, yeasts, viruses and rickettsiae, sterilization, 
immunity, epidemiology and disease production. 

MCPG 343. Pharmaceutical Microbiology II (2). Fall term, two lectures. Prerequisites: 
MCPG 332. A study of the transmission, treatment, diagnosis, prevention and etiological 
agent of diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria, viruses, molds, yeasts and rickettsiae. 
Part of the course is devoted to the study of medical parasitology, pathology and parasitic 
infections. 

MCPG 431,432. Biochemistry I & II (3,2). Fall term, three lectures; spring term, two 
lectures. Prerequisite: One year of organic chemistry. Physical and chemical properties 
and the components of living systems and of the metabolic processes in health and 
disease. 

MCPG 433. Biochemistry II (1): Spring term. Laboratory accompanying MCPG 432. 

MCPG 440. Community & Environmental Health (2). Eight lectures/week one month 
term; winter term. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. A study of the public 
health facilities in the community; their relationship to the practices of the allied health 
sciences and their impact on health care and the disease state as well as the role of 
ecosystems in the health care package. The application of statistical and epidemiological 
methods to health problems will be illustrated through lectures and demonstrations. 

MCPG 441. Pharmacognosy, General I (3). Fall term, three lectures. Prerequisite: 
Organic Chemistry, MCPG 431,432. A study of drugs from natural sources with emphasis 
on the therapeutic, chemical and physical properties of purified phytoconstituents and 
discussion of their economic and sociological importance and practical application in 
pharmacy. Nomenclature, history, source, extraction, identification and biosynthesis of 
carbohydrates, glycosides, tannins, volatile oils, lipids and enzymes are considered. 

MCPG 442. Pharmacognosy, General II (3). Spring term, two lectures and one lab- 
oratory. A continuation of MCPG 441, to include alkaloids, resins, hallucinogenic plants, 
harmful plants and certain aspects of allergy and allergenic plants. An intensive study 
of antibiotics and immunizing biologicals, discussion of their utilization and relationship 
to appropriate infections and pathological diseases is presented. 

MCPG 443,444. Chemistry of Medicinal Products I and II (3,2). Fall term, three 
lectures; spring term, two lectures. Prerequisite: One year organic chemistry. A survey 
of chemical properties, structure activity relationships, and metabolism of organic me- 
dicinal products. 

MCPG 448. Special Projects (var. 1-3). Independent investigations in the field of 
medicinal chemistry-pharmacognosy, consisting of library and laboratory or field re- 
search, seminars and/or other assignments appropriate to the problem being investigated. 

31 



MCPG 449. Special Group Studies (var. 1-5), repeatable up to 12 credits. Prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. An omnibus course permitting experimentation with new or dif- 
ferent subject matter and/or instructional approaches. 

MCPG 452. Antibiotics (2). Four lectures/week two months, spring term. Prerequisite: 
permission of the instructor. The study of antibiotic substances, history, methods of 
detection, production, biosynthesis, mechanism of action, extraction and assay together 
with the chemical, pharmaceutical and chemotherapeutic properties of these compounds. 

MCPG 454. Diagnostic and Clinical Microbiology (3). Four lectures and two-hour 
laboratory periods/week for two months, spring term. Prerequisites: MCPG 442 or 
permission of the instructor. Theory and techniques involved in clinical and diagnostic 
applied microbiology, particularly in routine serology, diagnostic microbiology, immu- 
neolectrophoresis, with quality control of parenteral solutions and other pharmaceutical 
preparations with emphasis on sterility methods in the unidose concept. 

PHARMACEUTICS 
(PHAR) 

Staff: Shangraw (Chairman), Augsburger, Hollenbeck, Jackson, Leslie 

PHAR 333,334. Basic Pharmaceutics I and II (4). Third year, three lectures, and one 
laboratory. A study of the basic technology involved in small and large scale production 
of pharmaceutical dosage forms (first semester: solid and semi-solid dosage forms; sec- 
ond semester: solutions and liquid disperse systems). It is also designed to increase the 
understanding of physical-chemical principles involved in pharmaceutical systems and 
the application of such knowledge to the problems involved in drug formulation, prep- 
aration, distribution, stability and pharmacological action. 

PHAR 441. Biopharmaceutics (3). Fall term. A study of the physical, chemical and 
biological factors which influence drug action with an emphasis on the choice of dosage 
forms and formulation to optimize therapeutic effect. 

PHAR 448. Special Projects (var. 1-3). Independent investigations in the field of 
pharmaceutics, consisting of library and laboratory or field research, seminars and/or 
other assignments appropriate to the problem being investigated. 

PHAR 449. Special Group Studies (var. 1-5), repeatable up to 12 credits. Prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. An omnibus course permitting experimentation with new or dif- 
ferent subject matter and/or instructional approaches. 

PHAR 451. Advanced Pharmaceutical Formulations & Compounding (2). Spring 
term, four lectures/week for two months. A study of the ingredients and techniques 
involved in the extemporaneous or small scale bulk compounding of pharmaceutical 
formulations utilized in community and hospital pharmacy. 

PHAR 452. Advanced Pharmaceutical Formulations & Compounding Laboratory 
(1). Spring term, laboratory. 

PHAR 453. Cosmetics and Dermatological Preparations (2). A presentation of the 
essential components of specialized areas of cosmetics and cosmetic-like preparations 
used in pharmacy. The course is designed to familiarize students with ingredients and 
processes involved in the formulation, manufacture and quality control of cosmetics. 
Lectures and topics on the fundamentals of cosmetic law and government regulations 
of importance to pharmacists. Planned field trips to the Noxell Corporation to acquaint 
the pharmacy student with the manufacturing operation on a commercial scale. 

PHAR 456. Cosmetics and Dermatological Preparations Laboratory (1). Spring 
term, laboratory. 

PHAR 464. Introduction to Industrial Pharmacy (2). Introduction to the organization 
and operation of pharmaceutical companies with particular emphasis on the develop- 

32 



ment, production and quality control of drug products and the regulatory implications 
involved in both production and sales. 

PHAR 475. Clinical Pharmacokinetics Seminar (1). One session per week. This sem- 
inar course is to provide students with a knowledge of the application of pharmacokinetic 
principles to clinical situations. Students will learn to kinetically analyze specific patients 
with an emphasis on how pathophysiologic processes and drugs influence the kinetics 
of the therapeutic agents. 

PHAR 485. Advanced Pharmaceutics (2). Two lectures per week. A study of spec- 
ialized formulations and dosage forms. Topics include: drug stability, drug packaging 
and devices, sterile dosage forms, radiopharmaceuticals, etc. 

PHAR 502. Advanced Biopharmaceutics (2). A clinically oriented in-depth study of 
the factors affecting the time-course of drugs with emphasis on the implication and 
qualification of these factors in the disease state. 



CLINICAL PHARMACY 
PCLN 

Staff: Kerr (Chairman), Cali, Haughey, Hoopes, Ireland, Klein-Schwartz, Love, Ma- 
jerus, Michocki, Oderda, Roffman, Wiser 

PCLN 346. Pathophysiology (3). Spring term, three lectures. This course will enable 
students, by generally considering broad concepts of diseased physiologic processes, to 
relate them to specific disease states and to the rationale for the therapeutic correction. 
Emphasis at all times will be on disease processes rather than on the specifics of a given 
disease state. 

PCLN 362. Patient Care (4). A required four-week professional experience program 
designed to acquaint the pharmacy student with disease states and related therapeutics 
by involvement in hospital patient care. 

PCLN 448. Special Projects (var. 1-3). Independent investigations in the field of 
clinical pharmacy, consisting of library and laboratory or field research, seminars and/ 
or other assignments appropriate to the problem being investigated. 

PCLN 449. Special Group Studies (var. 1-5), repeatable up to 12 credits. Prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. An omnibus course permitting experimentation with new or dif- 
ferent subject matter and/or instructional approaches. 

PCLN 451. Clinical Toxicology (2). Fall term, four lectures/week for two months. 
Deals with the clinical classes of poisoning and includes pharmacological principles in 
treatment of acute poisoning, mechanism of toxic actions of drugs and household prod- 
ucts and responsibilities of poison control officers. 

PCLN 461 .Therapeutics (3). Fall term, six hours/week for two months. A course de- 
signed to present basic principles of rational drug therapy within the context of various 
pathophysiologic processes which the student has already learned. Concurrently, salient 
points in the evaluation of therapeutic literature will be discussed. 

PCLN 462. Statistics in Clinical Investigation (1). Winter term, four hours/week. The 
course is designed to introduce the student to the elements of statistics and demonstrate 
their application to study design with the aim of improving the student's ability to 
evaluate clinical literature. 

PCLN 463. Drug Induced Diseases (2). Fall term, consent of coursemaster. Focus is 
on the clinical manifestations and incidence of drug reactions; systems affected; differ- 
entiation between idiosyncratic reactions, hypersensitivity reactions, and extensions of 
pharmacologic action; and assessment of drug reaction literatures. 

33 



PCLN 570. Clinical Clerkship I (4). A four-week professional experience program 
designed to acquaint the pharmacy student with disease states and related therapeutics 
by involvement in hospital patient care. Fall term. 

PCLN 578. Clinical Clerkship II (3 credits/month). Students will work closely with the 
clinical pharmacy staff in the areas where clinical services exist and would be given some 
direct responsibility in patient-care services and in directing undergraduate students in 
their basic clerkships. Emphasis in these experiences would be placed on solving specific 
therapeutic problems, gaining clinical experience in the practical problems encountered 
in therapeutics and gaining experience in providing drug information. 

PCLN 579. Clinical Clerkship III (3 credits/month). Clerkships for advanced students 
designed to improve the depth of their clinical skills and to allow for initial selection of 
areas of specialty. 

PCLN 580,581. Clinical Therapeutics Seminar I, II (1,1). One session per week. A 
seminar designed to provide the student with experience in analyzing specific patient 
therapeutic problems through formal patient presentation and analysis seminars con- 
ducted by members of the clinical pharmacy division and medical personnel. 



PHARMACOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY 
(PCOL) 

Staff: Khazan (Chairman). Buterbaugh, Eccles, Lesher, Moreton, Tommasello, Weiner 

PCOL 331,332. Anatomy & Physiology I & II (4,4). Three lectures and one laboratory. 
Fall and Spring terms. A comprehensive study of structural and functional relationships 
in the human body with special emphasis on aspects of disease processes and sites of 
drug action. Prerequisite for PCOL 441,442. 

PCOL 358. Drug Abuse Education (1-3). Spring term. Practice and training in the 
dissemination of drug information, especially drug abuse information to the public. 

PCOL 441,442. Pharmacodynamics I & II (4,3). Three lectures and one laboratory, 
fall term; three lectures second semester. A comprehensive study of pharmacodynamics 
leading to the rational therapeutic application of drugs. Prerequisite: PCOL 331,332 or 
permission of instructor. 




34 



PCOL 448. Special Projects (var. 1-3). Independent investigations in the field of 
pharmacology and toxicology, consisting of library and laboratory or field research, 
seminars and/or other assignments appropriate to the problem being investigated. 

PCOL 449. Special Group Studies (var. 1-5), repeatable up to 12 credits. Prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. An omnibus course permitting experimentation with new or dif- 
ferent subject matter and/or instructional approaches. 

PCOL 452. Principles of Toxicology (3). Spring term, four lectures/week for two 
months, with conferences and laboratory projects equivalent to one laboratory. Deals 
with basic principles of investigative toxicology and includes toxic effects on organ, 
cell and enzyme systems, forensic toxicology and toxicity of classes of compounds. 

PCOL 470,471. Drug Action Conference I, II (1, & 1). One session per week. The 
course will be presented in each semester and will have a topic schedule which repeats 
itself every two years. The course is an interdisciplinary seminar designed to present a 
wide variety of fundamental and applied aspects of the effect of drugs on the biological 
systems at a level of sophistication commensurate with that of the Pharm.D. student. 
The primary objective is to improve the student's ability when observing an altered 
therapeutic response or when attempting to predict an alteration in advance, to utilize 
his basic science knowledge in thinking about the following determinants of drug activity; 
dosage form and route of administration, dose and dose regimen, absorption, distrib- 
ution, metabolism, excretion, receptor-drug interactions, drug-drug interactions, inter- 
actions with other substances, effects of disease and miscellaneous patient and drug 
variables. 



PHARMACY PRACTICE AND ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCES 
(PPAS) 

Staff: Lamy (Chairman), Allen, Beardsley, Burkhart, Fedder, Knapp, Leavitt, Oed, 
Palumbo, S. Speedie 

PPAS 331. Introduction to Pharmacy & Health Care (1). Third year, fall term, one 
lecture. An orientation program designed to acquaint students with the role of pharmacy 
together with the other members of the health professions in the delivery of health care 
services — past, present and future. Prerequisite for PPAS 332. 

PPAS 332. Medical Care Organization (3). Spring term, three lectures. A study of the 
pharmaceutical industry and the distribution of drug products and pharmaceutical serv- 
ices. Special emphasis is placed on the patient and on the institutions involved in sup- 
plying health care to the patient. Prerequisite: PPAS 331 or permission of instructor. 

PPAS 341. Technical and Behavioral Aspects of Pharmacy Practice (3). A study 
of the application of the principles of the social sciences to patient care and health care 
systems. Spring term. 

PPAS 342. Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence (3). Fall term, three lectures. Funda- 
mentals of law of importance to pharmacists; federal and state laws and regulations 
pertaining to the sale of drugs, narcotics, poison and pharmaceutical preparations. 

PPAS 344. Pharmacy Management 1 (3). Spring term, three lectures. A study of the 
generation and utilization of accounting information in the management of community 
and institutional practices. 

PPAS 351,352. Community Pharmacy Management II, III (2,2). Fall and spring term, 
four lectures/week for two months. Prerequisite: PPAS 344. A study of the management 
problems of community pharmacy, including organization, staffing, directing, planning 
and control. 

35 



PPAS 353. Non-Prescription Drugs (2). A comprehensive course dealing with self- 
medication and over-the-counter drugs. Among the topics discussed are the socio-his- 
torical aspects of self-medication, the regulation of non-prescription drugs, the manu- 
facture and distribution of OTC drugs, the advertising of OTC drugs and the therapeutic 
categories and pharmacology of OTC drugs. 

PPAS 354. Parapharmaceuticals (2). Spring term, four lectures/week for two months. 
A discussion of prescription accessories and related items to enable the pharmacist to 
act as consultant to members of the health care team and his patients. Emphasis will 
be placed on design, composition, proper use and contraindications. 

PPAS 355. History of Pharmacy (1). Spring term, two lectures/week for two months. 
A survey of the history of pharmacy with emphasis on those aspects more pertinent to 
the practice of pharmacy in the United States and Maryland. 

PPAS 356. Health Economics (2). Spring term. The overall goal of this course is to 
afford students an appreciation for the economic factors influencing health care in general 
and the economic implications of activities in various facets of the health care industry. 

PPAS 363. Special Studies (2). By permission of the Professional Experience Program 
director. An elective four-week professional experience in a specialized health care 
service or related area. 

PPAS 368. Community Practice (2-8). Two credits/four weeks. A four-week profes- 
sional experience in community practice with a minimum of two credits (one unit) 
required of each student. 

PPAS 369. Institutional Practice (2-8). Two credits/four weeks. A four-week profes- 
sional experience in institutional practice with a minimum of two credits (one unit) 
required of each student. 

PPAS 418. Pharmacy and Nursing Perspectives on Death and Dying (3). Spring 
term, 3 hours per week. This interdisciplinary course examines the social and psycho- 
logical aspects of death and dying and the various approaches to interaction with ter- 
minally-ill patients. 

PPAS 448. Special Projects (var. 1-3). Independent investigations in the field of 
pharmacy practice and administrative sciences consisting of library and laboratory or 
field research, seminars and/or other assignments appropriate to the problem being 
investigated. 

PPAS 449. Special Group Studies (var. 1-5), repeatable up to 12 credits. Prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. An omnibus course permitting experimentation with new or dif- 
ferent subject matter and/or instructional approaches. 

PPAS 450. Pharmacy Practice (2). Fall term, four lectures or discussions/week for two 
months. A presentation of the essential components of specialized areas of study as they 
apply to pharmacy practice, including an analysis of the health professions and the health 
care system, methods of drug distribution and control, radiopharmaceuticals, sterile 
dosage forms, parapharmaceuticals, non-prescription drugs, cosmetics, drug stability 
packaging and administration. 

PPAS 454. Institutional Pharmacy I (2). Fall term, four lectures/week for two months. 
Fundamentals of institutional pharmacy practice and administration with emphasis on 
hospital and nursing homes. Includes physical facilities, standards, purchasing, formu- 
lary, record keeping, drug distribution and control systems. 

PPAS 455. Institutional Pharmacy II (2). Spring term, four lectures/week for two 
months. A study of the administrative organization of health care institutions and in- 
terrelationship of various units with the pharmacy. Includes in-depth, individual study 
of one particular aspect of institutional pharmacy practice. 

36 



PPAS 456. Institutional Pharmacy Management (3). Spring term, six lectures/week 
for two months. A study of the application of management principles to the institutional 
environment with emphasis on the management systems applicable to the hospital and 
extended care facility. 

PPAS 457. Parenteral Therapy (2). Spring term. Prerequisite: PPAS 450 or permission 
of instructor. A comprehensive review of all aspects of intravenous fluid therapy, directly 
involving the pharmacist. Emphasis will center around planning, organizing, and im- 
plementing an Intravenous Admixture Program, internal and external pressures influ- 
encing development in fluid therapy programs, preparation of sterile products, and basic 
concepts of fluid balance and disease state, total parenteral nutrition and cancer par- 
enteral chemotherapy. 

PPAS 460. Pharmacy & Therapeutics Colloquium (1). Spring term, two hours/week 
for two months. Discussions of case studies from professional experience program and 
current developments in pharmacy. 

PPAS 462. Pharmacy and the Health Care System (2). Spring term, four lectures/ 
week for two months, (undergraduates with permission of the instructor). A course 
designed to familiarize pharmacists with the total health care environment; to introduce 
applicable, analytical and technical skills, such as systems analysis and computer science; 
to identify the various social, political, economic and professional pressures which are 
influencing developments in health care and to increase the pharmacist's appreciation 
of the changes affecting the health care system. 

PPAS 569. Institutional Practice II (2). Summer. A clerkship to acquaint the student 
with the operation of the various functional units of a hospital pharmacy, including IV 
admixture, drug information, central and decentralized pharmacy services, etc. 




37 



PPAS 582,583. Clinical Teaching Seminar 1,11 (1,1). One session per week. A seminar 
course designed to analyze the various clinical teaching techniques and their application. 
Discussion will center on the application of the problem oriented medical record to 
clinical teaching, the problem oriented educational audit, problems encountered in clin- 
ical teaching, methods of orienting students to the clinical environment and a discussion 
of group dynamics in relation to communication skills and interpersonal relationships. 

GENERAL COURSES 

PHMY 340. Advanced First Aid (1-3). Minimester and spring term. Attendance is 
required for certification. 

PHMY 342. Calculus (4). Required course or equivalent for consideration for admission 
to the Pharm.D. Program. Problems in Chemistry, Biology and related disciplines are 
used to justify the mathematical concepts that provide the tools necessary for their 
solution. Differentiation and integrations techniques are covered thoroughly and math- 
ematical modeling based on the Calculus is discussed throughout the course. General 
topics studied are: Graphs, functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, antiderivatives, the 
definite integral, partial derivatives, curves and lines of regression correlations, and 
differential equations. 



38 



GRADUATE PROGRAM 




39 



The School of Pharmacy offers, through The Graduate School of the University of 
Maryland, programs leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees 
in medicinal chemistry, pharmacognosy, pharmacology and toxicology and pharmaceu- 
tics. There is also a Graduate Residency Program in Hospital Pharmacy leading to a 
Master of Science degree and a Certificate of Residency in Hospital Pharmacy. 

The facilities for research and graduate instruction consist of specialized laboratories 
containing a wide range of modern equipment. Major equipment includes a gas chro- 
matograph coupled to a mass spectrometer, nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers, 
Magnaferm Fermentor and Bioflofermentor, plant tissue culture and biotransformation 
equipment, instrumented rotary and single punch tablet machines, complete aerosol 
equipment, equipment for radioactive counting and synthesis of radioactive compounds, 
in addition to other standard research equipment. The Health Sciences Library located 
on the campus contains a wide selection of specialized books and research journals and 
the professional schools computer center is also located on campus. 

Most of the faculty at the School of Pharmacy are actively engaged in research and are 
well qualified to direct research in many areas including neuropharmacology, biochem- 
ical pharmacology, toxicology, synthesis and structure activity relationships of phar- 
macologically active compounds, pharmaceutical analysis, radiopharmaceuticals, isola- 
tion and structure elucidation of natural occurring compounds, biopharmaceutics, 
physical chemistry, industrial pharmacy and institutional pharmacy. 

FEES 

Tuition — Per Credit 

In-State $ 55.00 

Out-of-State 100.00 

Graduation Fee: 

Master of Science 15.00 

Doctor of Philosophy 60.00 

Continuous Registration Fee 10.00 

(For additional fees, see page 16) 

Financial Aid 

Research and tuition-fee teaching assistantships and fellowships are available to qualified 
students. 

Cost of Living 

Estimates for single students range between $3500 and $4500 per year. Limited on- 
campus housing for men and women is available and meals can be purchased at numerous 
facilities on or near the campus. 

Applying 

Two copies of the completed application and two copies of official transcripts from each 
college or university attended must be received by the Dean for Graduate Studies and 
Research by May 15th for the summer semester; July 1st for the fall semester and 
December 1st for the winter and spring semesters. 



40 



Graduate Program in Medicinal Chemistry-Pharmacognosy 

Programs of Study 

The Department of Medicinal Chemistry-Pharmacognosy offers graduate programs of 
study leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Current 
research interest is on drug metabolism, the development of radiopharmaceuticals, pes- 
ticide biotransformations and the biosynthesis and regulation and formation of secondary 
metabolites. Research in analytical, synthetic medicinal chemistry, natural products 
chemistry and plant tissue culture is also in progress. 

The goal of the department's graduate program is to prepare medicinal chemists and 
pharmacognosists for academic, industrial or government careers. Applications are pre- 
ferred from candidates with a strong background in chemistry, biology or pharmaceutical 
sciences. 

Students are guided through their graduate program by an advisory committee which 
designs a program in cooperation with the student to meet the needs and interests of 
the individual student. The student must complete a core of courses and choose electives 
from a wide range of available courses from both within and outside of the School of 
Pharmacy. An independent research project must be completed under the direction of 
a faculty member and presented as a thesis or dissertation to the Graduate School. The 
Doctor of Philosophy program can usually be completed in four years. 

Research Facilities 

The department, an administrative unit of the School of Pharmacy, is located in modern, 
air conditioned facilities. The specialized laboratories of the department are equipped 
with the appropriate instrumentation (e.g. mass spectrometer, NMR, fermentors, etc.) 
to carry out the ongoing research programs of the department. A computer center and 
the Health Sciences Library are located within a block of the department. 

Applying 

For information on graduate studies in medicinal chemistry-pharmacognosy, write to: 
Director of Graduate Studies 

Department of Medicinal Chemistry-Pharmacognosy 
School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland 
636 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21202 

Faculty and Their Research Interests 

Ralph N. Blomster, Ph.D., (1963), University of Connecticut. Professor of Pharma- 
cognosy and Department Chairman. Areas of research interest include phytochemistry 
and phytochemical screening, medicinal folklore evaluation, thin-layer chromatography, 
biotransformation and tissue culture. 

Patrick S. Callery, Ph.D. (1974), University of California, San Francisco. Associate 
Professor of Medicinal Chemistry. Studies of the metabolism and disposition of drugs; 
radioactive and stable isotope labelling; biomedical applications of mass spectrometry. 

S. Edward Krikorian, Ph.D. (1967). Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Associate 
Professor of Medicinal Chemistry. Studies of near-infrared spectroscopy with possible 
applications to pharmaceutical analysis; gas-liquid chromatogrphic behavior of the salt 
forms of acidic and basic drugs. 

Karl -Heinz A. Rosier, Ph.D. (1960). University of Munich. Associate Professor of Phar- 
macognosy. Synthesis and structure evaluation of quinone derivative of flavonoids with 
potential antitumor activity; isolation and structure elucidation of phytoconstituents from 

41 



Nigerian plants with cytotoxic activity; synthesis and structure proof of modified fla- 
vonoids with potential hypotensive activity. 

Marilyn K. Speedie, Ph.D. (1973). Purdue University. Assistant Professor of Phar- 
macognosy. Studies of biosynthesis and regulation of formation of secondary metabo- 
lites, especially antibiotics; enzymology and genetics of control mechanisms. 

Larry A. Spitznagle, Ph.D. (1969). Purdue University. Associate Professor of Medicinal 
Chemistry and Nuclear Medicine. Synthesis of radioactive drugs of diagnostic use in 
humans; use of radiopharmaceuticals for the visualization of internal organs and for the 
measurement of regional rates of metabolism. 

Jeremy Wright, Ph.D. (1965). University of London. Associate Professor of Medicinal 
Chemistry. Drug metabolism studies. Investigation of toxic intermediates in biotrans- 
formation reactions. Stereochemical studies of metabolic reactions using isotopically 
labelled compounds and gas chromatographic mass spectrometric techniques. 

Nicolas Zenker, Ph.D. (1958). University of California. Professor of Medicinal Chem- 
istry. Studies of enzymes and metabolic inhibitors. Thyroid-adrenal relationships. 

The following partial list of topics is representative of research either currently in progress 

or recently completed. 

— Alternate pathways for the production of gamma aminobutyric acid 

— Synthesis and screening of new radiosensitizers 

— Analyses of gamma aminobutyric acid and related compounds by gas chromatography- 

mass spectrometry 
— Preparation of radiopharmaceuticals for drug analogs 
— Near-infrared spectrophotometric characterization of the amide group 
— The biosynthesis of indolmycin 

— Biotransformation of and breakdown of recalcitrant pesticides 
— Schiffs bases of betalamic acid 



Courses in Medicinal Chemistry Pharmacognosy 
(MCPG) 

MCPG 411,412. Plant Anatomy (2,2). Two lectures a week. 

MCPG 413,414. Plant Anatomy Laboratory (2,2). Two laboratories/week. Prerequi- 
sites: MCPG 411,412,441,442. Laboratory work covering advanced plant anatomy with 
special emphasis placed on the structure of roots, stems, and leaves of vascular plants. 

MCPG 421,422. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants (2,2). Given in alternate years. One 
lecture and one laboratory/week. Prerequisites: MCPG 441,442. A study of the kinds 
of seed plants and ferns, their classification, and field work on local flora. Instruction 
will be given in the preparation of an herbarium. 

MCPG 431,432. Biochemistry I and II (3,2). Fall term, three lectures; spring term, two 
lectures, one laboratory. Prerequisite: one year of organic chemistry. Physical and chem- 
ical properties of the components of living systems and of the metabolic processes in 
health and disease. 

MCPG 433. Biochemistry Laboratory (1). Spring term. 

MCPG 443,444. Chemistry of Medicinal Products I and II (3,2). Fall term, three 
lectures; spring term, two lectures. Prerequisities: one year organic chemistry. A survey 
of chemical properties, structure activity relationships, and metabolism of organic me- 
dicinal products. 

MCPG 454. Physical Chemistry II (3). Three lectures per week for two months. Pre- 
requisite: calculus. An introduction to chemical kinetics molecular structure. 

42 



MCPG 470. Basic Nuclear Science (3). Three lectures per week. Prerequisite: one 
year of college chemistry and one year of college physics or consent of instructor. A 
study of the safe and effective use of radiotracers with emphasis on nuclear physics 
instrumentation for in vivo radioassay. counting statistics, tracer chemistry and radiation 
safety. 

MCPG 471. Basic Nuclear Science Laboratory (1). One three-hour laboratory period 
per week. Prerequisite: concurrent registration in MCPG 470 or consent of instructor. 
Training in the safe and effective use of radiotracers and nuclear instrumentation. 

MCPG 620. Instrumental Methods of Pharmaceutical Analysis (3). Two lectures, 
one laboratory, spring term. Prerequisites: organic chemistry, quantitative analysis. A 
survey of electrometric. spectroscopic, and chromatographic methods of chemical anal- 
ysis as applied especially to the analysis of materials of pharmaceutical interests. Basic 
principles and applications of the various techniques will be stressed so that the student 
will gain an appreciation of the scope and utility of the methods discussed. 

MCPG 640. Structure Elucidation of Medicinal Agents (2). Two lectures per week. 
Prerequisites: organic chemistry. MCPG 620 or consent of instructor. A survey of struc- 
ture determination as applied to biologically active substances. 

MCPG 646,647. Fermentation and Biosynthesis of Natural Products (2,2). Topics 
to be discussed and studied in the laboratory in the fermentation area are the biosynthesis 
of secondary metabolites, batch and continuous culture, and microbial degradation and 
transformations. Biosynthetic topics to be presented will be the use of the isotopes C, 
1S N and 13 C and 3 H in elucidation of biosynthetic pathways, regulation of secondary 
metabolism, and stereospecificity and mechanism of enzyme reactions. Prerequisites: 
MCPG 332,442,443.444 or the equivalent or by special permission of the instructor. 

MCPG 709. Non-Thesis Research (1-3). 

MCPG 739. Seminar (1). Each semester, required of students majoring in medicinal 
chemistry. Reports of progress and survey of recent developments in chemistry. 

MCPG 741. Physical Organic Basis of Medicinal Chemistry (3). Three lectures, fall 
term. Prerequisites: physical chemistry, intermediate organic chemistry. A discussion 
of atomic structure, bonding, resonance, kinetics and mechanism of organic reactions; 
stereochemistry and conformation analysis. 

MCPG 758. Special Problems (1-3). 

MCPG 769. Topics in Advanced Medicinal Chemistry (2). Two lectures, spring term. 
Odd years. Prerequisites: MCPG 443.444.741. Discussions of drug-receptor interactions 
and of the known chemical factors which mediate drug action, including a discussion of 
the current quantitative concepts of structure activity relationships in medicinal chem- 
istry. 

MCPG 781. Enzyme and Metabolic Inhibitors (2). Two lectures, fall term, odd years. 
Prerequisite: MCPG 431,432. A discussion of the design, the mode of action at the 
enzymatic level, and the metabolism of biochemical analogs. 

MCPG 799. Thesis Research Masters Level (Variable Credit). 

MCPG 811,812. Chemotaxonomic and Phytochemical Methodology (4,4). Given 
in alternate years. Two lectures and two laboratories. Prerequisite: approval of instruc- 
tor. A study of plant products from the chemotaxonomic and microchemical standpoint. 
Emphasis will be placed on the screening of phytochemical constituents and their re- 
lationship to phytogeny. 

MCPG 841,842. Natural Products Chemistry (4,4). Non-nitrogenous heterocycles and 
nitrogenous heterocycles. 

MCPG 899. Dissertation Research Doctoral Level (Variable Credit). 



43 



Graduate Program in Pharmaceutics 
Programs of Study 



The goal of the pharmaceutics program is to provide a broad based educational back- 
ground emphasizing the theoretical and technical disciplines essential for dosage form 
design and evaluation. There is a continuing need for such pharmaceutical scientists in 
the research and development laboratories of the pharmaceutical industry, in education 
and with government regulatory and research agencies. 

The student selects a program of coursework which includes (1) a core of basic phar- 
maceutic sciences common to all students, and (2) those additional courses in the major 
and supporting areas which most adequately prepare them for their career goals in one 
of the specialties. Courses are drawn not only from the departmental offerings, but also 
from the relevant graduate offerings of other departments within the School of Pharmacy 
and in other health professions schools on the University of Maryland at Baltimore 
campus. The close proximity of the University of Maryland to Baltimore County campus 
(approximately 10 miles) also provides a ready resource for basic sciences and other 
supportive courses, as do the numerous other colleges and universities located in the 
metropolitan area. 

Research Facilities 

The graduate industrial and physical pharmacy laboratories include facilities and equip- 
ment for the production and evaluation of solid, semi-solid, liquid and aerosol dosage 
forms. A specially equipped solids research laboratory includes instrumented single 
punch and rotary tablet presses, an instrumented automatic capsule filling machine, 
tablet coating and powder technology equipment, as well as automated dissolution and 
tablet hardness testers. In addition, laboratory colloid mills, roller mills and homoge- 
nizers provide the capability for small and large scale liquid and semisolid production. 
Several controlled environment chambers are available for accelerated stability studies 
of all types of dosage forms. 

The School's Clinical Pharmacokinetics Laboratory is unique in that it fosters the 
strengths of the various pharmaceutical and medical disciplines on the University of 
Maryland at Baltimore campus through the development of a combined service-edu- 
cational-research effort which (a) performs pharmacokinetic analysis in patients undergo- 
ing or being considered for long term treatment with select drugs; (b) develops under- 
and post-graduate educational programs in pharmacokinetics and (c) initiates multifa- 
ceted pharmacokinetic research projects involving both clinical and basic themes. This 
laboratory, which provided an extensive resource for biopharmaceutical-pharmacoki- 
netic research, is equipped with such modern instruments as automated gas chroma- 
tographers, liquid chromatographs, radiation counting equipment, spectrophotometers, 
desk top mini-computer, calculators, etc. 




44 



Applying 

Applicants should have a degree in pharmacy. Majors in chemistry, biology, engineering 
or physics will also be considered, although such students may be required to take some 
additional undergraduate courses to fulfill requirements. For further information, write 
to: 

Director of Graduate Studies 

Department of Pharmaceutics 

University of Maryland School of Pharmacy 

636 West Lombard Street 

Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



Faculty and Research Interests 

Ralph F. Shangraw. Ph.D. (1958). University of Michigan. Professor of Pharmaceutics 
and Department Chairman. Consultant to the pharmaceutical industry and a leader in 
professional and scientific organizations. He has been a member of the USP Committee 
of Revision since 1970 and is presently chairman of the Subcommittee on Formulations. 
Has published more than 50 research papers and includes among his research interests 
industrial pharmacy (tableting, aerosols, rheology, emulsions and foams) stability (ni- 
troglycerin) packaging and bioavailability. 

Larry L. Augsburger, Ph.D. (1967). University of Maryland. Associate Professor of 
Pharmaceutics and Director of the Pharmaceutics Graduate Program. Areas of research 
includes industrial pharmacy, formulation and processing factors affecting drug bioa- 
vailability, physical and mechanical properties of pharmaceutical solids and solid dosage 
forms, instrumentation of tablet presses and capsule filling machines and rheology. 

R. Gary Hollenbeck, Ph.D. (1977). Purdue University. Assistant Professor of Phar- 
maceutics. Areas of research relate to the general area of physical pharmacy and include 
thermodynamics of real solutions, drug-excipient interactions in solution, and water 
vapor adsorption of heterogeneous systems. 

Andre J. Jackson, Ph.D. (1972). University of Cincinnati. Assistant Professor of Phar- 
maceutics. Areas of interest include biopharmaceutics and liposomes as an improved 
drug delivery system. 

James Leslie, Ph.D. (1959). Queen's University of Belfast. Associate Professor of 
Pharmaceutics and Assistant Director of the Clinical Pharmacokinetics Laboratory. 
Areas of research interests include kinetics of reactions of biological interest and de- 
velopment of methods of drug analysis. 

The following partial list of topics is representative of research projects either currently 
in progress or recently completed: 

Development and evaluation of new pharmaceutical excipients for direct compression 
of tablets including filler binders, lubricants and disintegrating agents 

Effect of formulation and processing variables on bioavailability from compressed 
tablets and gelatin capsules 

Formulation and stability of nitroglycerin dosage forms 

Instrumentation of tablet presses and capsule filling equipment for optimizing man- 
ufacturing and formulation variables 

Design of pharmaceutical buffer systems 

Effects of adsorbed moisture on the compressibility of pharmaceutical excipients 

Drug-excipient complexation in solutions 

Pharmacokinetics of analgesics in sickle cell anemia patients during crisis 

Pharmacokinetics of aminogolycosides in diseased states 

Pharmacokinetics of theophylline 

Kinetics of hydrolysis of barbiturates and related compounds 

Development of assays and pharmacokinetics for cardiovascular drugs 

45 



Pharmaceutics Courses 
(PHAR) 

PHAR 441: Biopharmaceutics (3). Fall term. A study of the physical, chemical and 
biological factors which influence drug action with an emphasis on the choice of dosage 
forms and formulations to optimize therapeutic effect. Introduction to pharmacokinetics 
including a study of the time course of drugs in body fluids and tissues by means of a 
mathematical treatment of absorption, distribution and excretion. 

PHAR 453: Cosmetics and Dermatological Preparations (2). A presentation of the 
essential components of specialized areas of cosmetics and cosmetic-like preparations, 
used in pharmacy. The course is designed to familiarize students with ingredients and 
processes involved in the formulation, manufacture, and quality control of cosmetics. 

PHAR 602: Advanced Biopharmaceutics (3). Three lectures, given in alternate years. 
Prerequisites: PHAR 441 , PCOL 441 ,442 and calculus. With the consent of the instructor 
some or all of these prerequisites may be waived. A clinically-oriented in-depth study 
of the factors affecting the time-course of drugs with emphasis on the implication and 
qualification of these factors in the disease states. 

PHAR 610: Pharmaceutical Formulation and Unit Processes (3). Three lectures, 
fall term, given in alternate years. Prerequisites: PHAR 333 and 334. With the consent 
of the instructor some or all of these prerequisites may be waived. A study of the 
processes and equipment involved in the large-scale manufacture of pharmaceuticals, 
including a discussion of control procedures, new drug applications, patents, and the 
Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 

PHAR 612: Drug Stability and Packaging Technology (3). Three lectures, spring 
term, given in alternate years. Prerequisites: PHAR 334 and 441. With the consent of 
the instructor some or all of these prerequisites may be waived. A study of drug stability 
as affected by environment and containers with emphasis on the physical and chemical 
properties of both the drugs and the component parts of the container as well as the 
practical problems of drug pacakaging, storage and clinical effectiveness. 

PHAR 701 : Theoretical Aspects of Liquid Dosage Forms (3). Three lectures, fall 
term, given in alternate years. Prerequisites: PHAR 333,334 and an acceptable course 
in physical chemistry. With the consent of the instructor some or all of these prerequisites 
may be waived. The application of fundamental physiocochemical concepts of solution 
theory, colloids, rheology and surface chemistry in order to gain an understanding of 
liquid dosage forms. 

PHAR 702: Theoretical Aspects of Solid Dosage Forms (3). Three lectures, spring 
term, given in alternate years. Prerequisites: PHAR 333,334 and an acceptable course 
in physical chemistry. With the consent of the instructor some or all of these prerequisites 
may be waived. A survey of the fundamentals relevant to the performance and processing 
of solid dosage forms. As most pharmaceuticals are prepared from powders, special 
emphasis is given to means of identifying, measuring and controlling those properties 
that determine the processing characteristics of powdered materials. 

PHAR 703: Industrial Pharmacy Laboratory (2). Two laboratories, given in alternate 
years. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Laboratory practice in the preparation of 
useful and important pharmaceuticals in large quantity, including the observance of 
federal "Good Manufacturing Practices". 

PHAR 705,706: Special Topics in Pharmaceutics (2,2). Two laboratories. A study 
of the special problems involved in the design, manufacturing and distribution of phar- 
maceutical products including stabilization, preservation, optimization of drug availa- 
bility, packaging and drug utilization. 

PHAR 708: Product Development Laboratory (2-4). Each semester, laboratories and 
conferences as needed. Credit according to the amount of work undertaken after con- 

46 



sultation with the instructor. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. The development 
of new pharmaceutical or cosmetic preparations from concept through marketing. 

PHAR 709: Pharmaceutical Seminar (1). Each semester. Required of students ma- 
joring in pharmacy. Reports of progress in research and surveys of recent developments 
in pharmacy. 

PHAR 747: Advanced Pharmacokinetics (3). Offered in alternate years. Two hours 
of lecture weekly and laboratory projects equivalent to one laboratory per week. A 
detailed study of the principles of drug transport, distribution, biotransformation, bind- 
ing and excretion with emphasis on quantitative aspects and measurement of these 
processes. Anatomy and Physiology and PHAR 602 or equivalent. 

PHAR 799: Thesis Research Masters Level (variable credit), staff. 

PHAR 801: Physical Pharmacy (3). Prerequisite: One year of college level physical 
chemistry. A study of pharmaceutical systems using the fundamentals of physical chem- 
istry. In particular, the course aims to provide the graduate student with a deeper 
understanding of some fundamental concepts of thermodynamics. In addition, basic 
concepts of chemical kinetics will be introduced with applications to the decomposition 
of medicinal agents. 

PHAR 899: Dissertation Research Doctoral Level (variable credit), staff. 

Graduate Program in Pharmacology and Toxicology 

Programs of Study 

The Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology offers graduate programs of study 
leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in pharmacology 
and toxicology. The research emphases of the departmental faculty include such areas 
of psychopharmacology, neuropharmacology, behavioral pharmacology, biochemical 
pharmaology and toxicology. 

The goal of the department's graduate program is to prepare scholar-scientists for careers 
in pharmacology and/or toxicology. Candidates for admission should possess a strong 
background in chemistry and/or biology or pharmaceutical sciences. Graduate study 
committees aid in the planning and implementing of each student's program. Annual 
reviews are conducted to evaluate the student's progress toward the degree, based on 
faculty assessment of his coursework and seminar and research performance. Successful 
completion of written and oral comprehensive examinations is required prior to the 
student's admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree. The candidate is required to 
successfully defend a dissertation based on independent research. Students are expected 
to pursue graduate studies on a full-time basis. Completion of the Graduate School's 
doctoral requirements is usually accomplished within four years. 

Research Facilities 

The department's research facilities are located in the School of Pharmacy on the Bal- 
timore City campus of the University of Maryland. The department is equipped for 
research with a behavioral, biochemical, or physiological orientation. Members of the 
department have access to all supportive facilities of the professional school complex. 
These facilities include a computer center and a modern Health Sciences Library con- 
taining more than 140,000 bound volumes and 2,700 scientific journals. 

Applying 

For information on graduates studies in pharmacology and toxicology, write to: 
Director of Graduate Studies 
Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology 
University of Maryland School of Pharmacy 
636 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

47 



Faculty and Their Research Interests 

Nairn Khazan, Ph.D. (1960). Hebrew University, Jerusalem. Emerson Professor of 
Pharmacology and Toxicology and Department Chairman. Areas of interest include 
neuropsychopharmacology-neurophysiology and pharmacology of sleep, evoked poten- 
tials and EEG effects of halucinogens; observational methods of CNS drug evaluation; 
EEG, behavioral, and pharmacological effects of drugs of abuse; experimental addiction 
to morphine in the rat; the effects of morphine antagonists in suppressing relapse. 

Gary G. Buterbaugh, Ph.D. (1969). University of Iowa. Infulence dynamics, neuro- 
chemistry of seizure propagation; maturation of inhibitory mechanisms limiting the prop- 
agation of seizure activity; mechanisms of action of convulsants and anticonvulsants as 
related to monoaminergic pathways. 

Christine U. Ecc/es, Ph.D. (1979). Johns Hopkins University. Assistant Professor of 
Pharmacology and Toxicology. Environmental toxicology; behavioral pharmacology, 
toxicology of pesticides, mercury, and lead; electrophysiological and neuropharmacol- 
ogical techniques in toxicology and pharmacology. 

William J. Kinnard, Jr., Ph.D. (1957). Purdue University. Dean and Professor of Phar- 
macology. Behavioral pharmacology; cardiovascular pharmacology, drug screening tech- 
niques. 

Gary A. Lesher, Ph.D. (1977). Purdue University. Assistant Professor of Pharmacology 
and Toxicology. Disposition of morphine during the addiction cycle; biochemical mech- 
anisms of the interaction of morphine with psychotropic drugs in the dependent rat; 
effects of narcotics on drug metabolism. 

J. Edward Moreton, Ph.D. (1971). University of Mississippi. Associate Professor of 
Pharmacology and Toxicology. Neuropharmacology and behavioral pharmacology as 
they relate to the study of drug abuse and drug dependence; EEG and behavioral 
correlates of addiction; drug self-administration in the rat and rhesus monkey. 

Myron Weiner, Ph.D. (1971). University of Maryland. Associate Professor of Phar- 
macology and Toxicology. Biochemical pharmacology, drug biotransformation; role of 
cyclic nucleotides in drug metabolism; effects of drugs of abuse on central cyclic AMP 
and cyclic GMP systems. 

Gerard A. Young, Ph.D. (1973). McMaster University. Adjunct Assistant Professor. 
EEG and behavioral correlates of drugs of abuse, behavioral pharmacology of narcotic 
agonists and antagonists; computer analysis of drug-induced EEG changes. 

The following partial list of topics is representative of research either currently in progress 
or recently completed: 

Electroencephalographic studies on the development of tolerance and cross tolerance 
to mescaline in the rat 

Naltrexone blockade of development of long-term EEG and behavioral effect of 
morphine in the rat 

Modification of electroshock convulsant threshold and pattern by digitoxigenin and 
serotonergic systems 

Alterations in EEG, EMG and behavior produced by acute ethanol administration 

Drug self-administration and sleep-awake activity in rats dependent on morphine, 
methadone or 1-alpha-acetylmethadol 

Regional brain uptake and distribution of H 3 -digitoxigenin 

Role of cyclic adenine nucleotides in the regulation of drug metabolism in normal and 
disease states such as cancer and diabetes 

Drug metabolism and drug interactions in the narcotic dependent rat 

Correlation between drug concentration and behavior in self-maintained narcotic de- 
pendent rats 

Behavioral and neurophysiological consequences of prenatal exposure to environ- 
mental toxicants 

48 



Pharmacology & Toxicology Courses 

PCOL 601,602: Advanced Toxicology (3,4). Lectures with conferences and laboratory 
experiments dealing with the mechanisms of toxicity. A two-semester course, either 
semester may be taken separately. PCOL 601: Clinical and Environmental Toxicology 
(fall semester). PCOL 602: Principles of Investigative Toxicology (spring semester). 
Prerequisites: biochemistry (MCPG 431,432), anatomy and physiology (PCOL 331,332) 
or equivalent and consent of the instructor. 

PCOL 643,644: Pharmacodynamics I, II (4,4). Pharmacodynamics deals with the study 
of the biochemical and physiological effects of drugs on biological systems. The course 
deals with the mechanisms by which pharmacological agents interact with the living 
organism in order to provide the student with a rational basis for therapeutic uses, side 
effects and adverse reactions and drug interactions. The major areas to be covered are 
the pharmacodynamics of drugs influencing the peripheral nervous system, the central 
nervous system and the endocrine system. In addition, physiological and biochemical 
effects of chemotherapeutic agents will also be considered: These lectures (PCOL 
441,442) will be supplemented by weekly conferences and discussion groups. Students 
are required to submit acceptable written therapeutic projects covering a topic in ad- 
vanced pharmacology and therapeutics. Prerequisites: anatomy and physiology (PCOL 
331,332) and biochemistry (MCPG 431,432) or equivalent and consent of the course 
director. 

PCOL 707: Principles of Biochemical Pharmacology (3). Offered in alternate years. 
Two lectures, one laboratory weekly. A theoretical and practical approach to the study 
of the cellular and subcellular actions of drugs and the relationship of these actions to 
the pharmacological properties of medicinal agents in the intact organism. Prerequisites: 
Pharmacodynamics I, II (PCOL 441,442), Biochemistry (MCPG 431,432) or equivalent 
and consent of the instructor. 

PCOL 720: Techniques and Concepts of Pharmacologic Analysis (3). The practical 
and theoretical aspects of classical and contemporary experimental methods used in 
pharmacology. From lectures, selected laboratory experiences and written and oral 
reports, the student will gain self-confidence in experimental methodology and data 
collection, reduction, and interpretation. Prerequisite: Consent of the department. 




49 



PCOL 721 : Introduction to Research in Pharmacology (3). Systematic rotation of 
the student through the various faculty research laboratories in the department. The 
student will obtain an understanding of research approaches and methodology, current 
data, and pertinent literature in the respective areas. Prerequisite: Consent of the de- 
partment. 

PCOL 727: Principles of Drug Action (2). A discussion of the general theoretical and 
practical principles of drug action, absorption, distribution, metabolism, and toxicity. 
(The pharmacodynamics of individual drugs or drug classes would be offered in PCOL 
643,644: Advanced Pharmacodynamics I. II). Prerequite: Consent of the department. 

PCOL 737: Pharmacometrics and Experimental Design (3). A discussion of the 
theoretical and practical application of statistics and experimental design to enable the 
student to utilize these tools in research problems. 

PCOL 789: Seminar (1). Each semester. Reports on current literature or research in 
progress. Prerequisite: consent of the department staff member designated as responsible 
for seminar. 

PCOL 799: Masters Thesis Research in Pharmacology. Properly qualified students 
may arrange with their advisor for credit hours. 

PCOL 829: Advanced Pharmacodynamics (3). A coordinated series of four one- 
semester courses involving two hours of lecture weekly together with conferences and 
special laboratorv exercises. Offered in alternate vears. Prerequisite: Pharmacodvnamics 
I.II (PCOL 441.442) or equivalent. 

829 A — Neuropsychopharmacology 

829B — Autonomic Pharmacology 

829C — Cardiovascular Pharmacology 

829D — Renal and Endocrine Pharmacology 

PCOL 858: Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics (2-4). Each semester. Labora- 
tories and conferences. Credit according to the amount of work undertaken after con- 
sultation with the instructor. Prerequisites: Pharmacodynamics I. II (PCOL 441.442) or 
equivalent. 

PCOL 899: Doctoral Dissertation Research in Pharmacology. Properly qualified 
students mav arrange with their advisor for credit and hours. 



Graduate Program in Institutional Pharmacy 

Program of Study 

The institutional pharmacy program aims at the education of pharmacists to function 
primarily in the patient care environment of institutions or other organized health care 
settings. Emphasis is placed on providing an optimum mix of administrative and patient- 
oriented (clinical) background, both from a theoretical as well as a practical point of 
view. The degree offered is an M.S. (thesis option only). 

The program of coursework is based on established courses in the pharmacy curriculum 
and also utilizes course offerings by the schools of medicine, nursing and social work 
and community planning. The student may pursue the degree in one of three ways: 

1. A full-time M.S. program, which usually will involve a two-year commitment 

2. A part-time course of study. This is open to a limited number of exceptionally 
well qualified practitioners who hold responsible positions in institutional phar- 
macy in the Baltimore-D.C. Metropolitan areas. 

3. A joint M.S. -Residency program in conjunction with area hospitals. Participating 
hospitals include the University of Maryland (accredited by the ASHP): The 
Johns Hopkins Hospital (accredited by ASHP): the Veterans Administration 
Medical Center in Washington. D. C. (ASHP accreditation pending) and the 

50 



Veterans Administration Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland (ASHP accre- 
ditation pending). 

In addition to coursework, the student must satisfactorily complete a program of research 

which will result in an acceptable thesis. Some previous thesis topics include: 

— Drug-utilization review in a day treatment center 

— A cost-comparison of unit dose in adult and pediatric medicine 

— Efficacy of preservations in radiopharmaceuticals 

— Reinforcement theory and patient education 

— Staffing requirements for institutional pharmacy 

— Medication errors in a multidose and a computerized unit dose drug distribution 
system 

— Physician-patient encounter in pediatric ambulatory services 

— Patient education and patient compliance in diabetic patients 

Facilities 

The program has access to all previously described laboratories and utilizes course 
offerings by the schools of medicine, nursing and social work and community planning. 
The combined facilities of the participating hospitals offer all aspects of institutional 
pharmacy, such as centralized and decentralized unit-dose distribution systems, com- 
puter systems, drug information, IV admixture and TPN services, patient counselling, 
rounding, audit, DUR, etc. 

Financial Aid 

Under the joint M.S. -Residency Program, the student receives a stipend from the hos- 
pital. Financial support for the M.S. program without a residency is not currently avail- 
able. 

Entrance Requirements 

Entrance requirements are the same as those for the pharmaceutics program except that 
applicants must have a degree in pharmacy. Having met these requirements, the ap- 
plicant who elects one of the M.S. -Residency programs must also apply to the preceptor 
of the residency of his choice. Applicants accepted into the joint program with the 
University of Maryland Hospital and The Johns Hopkins Hospital must be eligible for 
licensure in Maryland within six months of graduation. Those accepted into the program 
at the Veterans Administration Medical Center (Washington) or the Veterans Admin- 
istration Medical Center (Baltimore) must show proof of licensure at the beginning of 
the program. 

Applying 

For additional information on graduate study in institutional pharmacy and application 
forms, write: 

Director, Institutional Pharmacy Programs 

Department of Pharmacy Practice and Administrative Sciences 

University of Maryland School of Pharmacy 

636 West Lombard Street 

Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

Faculty 

Peter P. Lamy, Ph.D. (1964). Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science. Professor 
of Pharmacy; Director, Institutional Pharmacy Programs; Chairman, Department of 
Pharmacy Practice and Administrative Sciences. Research interests include geriatrics, 
drug interactions, drug distribution, information systems and nutrition. 

51 



Stuart M. Speedie, Ph.D. (1973). Purdue University. Assistant Professor, Department 
of Pharmacy Practice and Administrative Sciences and Director, Office of Educational 
Development. Research interests include health services research, computer applica- 
tions, patient education, health professional education. 

Preceptors: 

Vincent dePaul Burkhart, M.S., Director, Department of Pharmacy Services, Univer- 
sity of Maryland Hospital and Clinical Assistant Professor, School of Pharmacy. 

Director, Pharmacy Services, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Clinical Associate Pro- 
fessor, School of Pharmacy. 

Earl P. Labatt, M.A., Chief, Pharmacy Services, V. A. Medical Center, Washington, 
D. C. and Clinical Instructor, School of Pharmacy. 

John T. Jordan, Chief, Pharmacy Services, V. A. Medical Center, Baltimore, and 
Clinical Instructor, School of Pharmacy. 






52 



FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION 




53 



Faculty 

Professors 

William J. Kinnard, Jr., Ph. D., (1957), Purdue University, Dean and Professor of 
Pharmacology and Toxicology 

Dean E. Leavitt, Ph. D., (1968), Purdue University, Associate Dean for Administration 
and Professional Services and Professor of Pharmacy Practice and Administrative 
Sciences 

Ralph N. Blomster, Ph. D., (1963), University of Connecticut, Professor of Medicinal 
Chemistry and Pharmacognosy and Department Chairman 

Nairn Khazan, Ph. D., (1960), Hebrew University, Israel, Emerson Professor of Phar- 
macology and Toxicology and Department Chairman 

David A. Knapp, Ph. D., (1965), Purdue University, Professor of Pharmacy Practice 
and Administrative Sciences and Director of Graduate Studies and Research 

Peter P. Lamy, Ph. D., (1964), Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science, Professor 
of Pharmacy Practice and Administrative Sciences and Department Chairman 

Ralph F. Shangraw, Ph. D., (1959), University of Michigan, Professor of Pharmaceutics 
and Department Chairman 

Nicolas Zenker, Ph. D., (1958), University of California, Professor of Medicinal Chem- 
istry and Pharmacognosy 

Associate Professors 

Benjamin F. Allen, Ph. D., (1949), University of Maryland, Associate Professor of 
Pharmacy Practice and Administrative Sciences 

Larry L. Augsburger, Ph. D., (1967), University of Maryland, Associate Professor of 
Pharmaceutics 

Gary G. Buterbaugh, Ph. D., (1969), University of Iowa, Associate Professor of Phar- 
macology and Toxicology 

Patrick S. Callery, Ph. D., (1973), University of California, San Francisco, Associate 
Professor of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy 

Robert A. Kerr, Pharm. D., (1970), University of California, San Francisco, Associate 
Professor of Clinical Pharmacy and Department Chairman 

S. Edward Krikorian, Ph. D., (1967), Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Associate 
Professor of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy 

James Leslie, Ph. D., (1959), Queens University, Belfast, Ireland, Associate Professor 
of Pharmaceutics 

J. Edward Moreton, Ph. D., (1971), University of Mississippi, Associate Professor of 
Pharmacology and Toxicology 

Gary M. Oderda, Pharm. D., (1972), University of California, Associate Professor of 
Clinical Pharmacy and Director, Maryland Poison Information Center 

Francis B. Palumbo, Ph. D., (1974), University of Mississippi, Associate Professor of 
Pharmacy Practice and Administrative Sciences 

Karl-Heinz A. Rosier, Ph. D., (1960), University of Munich, Germany, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy 

Larry A. Spitznagle, Ph. D., (1969), Purdue University, Associate Professor of Medicinal 
Chemistry and Pharmacognosy 

Myron Weiner, Ph. D., (1972), University of Maryland, Associate Professor of Phar- 
macology and Toxicology 

Thomas H. Wiser, Pharm. D., (1973), University of Minnesota, Associate Professor of 
Clinical Pharmacy 

Jeremy Wright, Ph. D., (1965), University of London, England, Associate Professor of 
Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy 

Assistant Professors 

Robert S. Beardsley, Ph. D., (1977), University of Minnesota, Assistant Professor of 
Pharmacy Practice and Administrative Sciences 

54 



Thomas J. Cali, Pharm. D., (1973), Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science, 

Assistant Professor of Clinical Pharmacy 
Christine U. Eccles, Ph. D., (1979), Johns Hopkins University, Assistant Professor of 

Pharmacology and Toxicology 
Donald O. Fedder, M.P.H., (1978), Johns Hopkins University, Assistant Professor 

of Pharmacy Practice and Administrative Sciences and Director of Community 

Pharmacy Programs 
R. Gary Hollenbeck, Ph. D., (1977), Purdue University, Assistant Professor of Phar- 
maceutics 
John M. Hoopes, Pharm. D., (1973), Duquesne University, Assistant Professor of 

Clinical Pharmacy 
Gordon A. Ireland, Pharm. D., (1976), University of Minnesota, Assistant Professor 

of Clinical Pharmacy 
Andre J. Jackson, Ph. D., (1972), University of Cincinnati, Assistant Professor of 

Pharmaceutics 
Gary A. Lesher, Ph. D., (1977), Purdue University, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology 

and Toxicology 
Raymond C. Love, Pharm. D., (1977), University of Maryland, Assistant Professor of 

Clinical Pharmacy 
Thomas C. Majerus, Pharm. D., (1976), University of Minnesota, Assistant Professor 

of Clinical Pharmacy 
Robert J. Michocki, Pharm. D., (1974), University of Maryland, Assistant Professor of 

Clinical Pharmacy 
David S. Roffman, Pharm. D., (1973), University of Maryland, Assistant Professor of 

Clinical Pharmacy 
Wendy Klein-Schwartz, Pharm. D. (1977), University of Maryland, Assistant Professor 

of Clinical Pharmacy and Assistant Director of Maryland Poison Information Center 
Marilyn K. Speedie, Ph. D., (1973), Purdue University, Assistant Professor of Medicinal 

Chemistry and Pharmacognosy 
Stuart M. Speedie, Ph. D., (1973), Purdue University, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

Practice and Administrative Sciences and Director, Office of Educational Devel- 
opment 

Instructors 

David B. Haughey, Pharm. D., (1978), State University of New York at Buffalo, In- 
structor in Clinical Pharmacy 

Marvin L. Oed, B.S. Pharm., (1956), University of Maryland, Instructor in Pharmacy 
Practice and Administrative Sciences 

Anthony C. Tommasello, B.S. Pharm., (1973), University of Maryland, Instructor in 
Pharmacology and Toxicology 

Lecturers 

Paul T. Cuzmanes, LL.D., (1975), University of Baltimore 
Joseph S. Kaufman, LL.B., (1950), University of Maryland 

Board of Regents 

Mr. Peter F. O'Malley, Chairman, 1980 

Dr. Hugh A. McMullen, Vice Chairman, 1980 

Dr. Samuel H. Hoover, Secretary, 1982 

Mr. A. Paul Moss, Treasurer, 1983 

Mrs. Mary H. Broadwater, Assistant Secretary, 1983 

Mr. John C. Scarbath, Assistant Treasurer, 1980 

The Hon. Wayne A. Cawley, Jr., Ex-officio 

Mr. Percy M. Chaimson, 1981 

Mr. Ralph W. Frey, 1981 

55 



Ms. Hanne J. Lundsager, 1980 

Mr. Allen L. Schwait, 1984 

Ms. Dorina A. Shelton, 1980 

The Hon. Joseph D. Tydings, 1984 

Mr. Wilbur G. Valentine, 1982 

Mr. N. Thomas Whittington, Jr., 1980 



Administration 

University of Maryland — Central Administration 

President 

John S. Toll, B.S., Yale University, 1944; A.M., Princeton University, 1948; Ph.D., 

1952. 

Executive Vice President 

Albin O. Kuhn, B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; Ph.D., 1948. 

Vice President for Academic Affairs (Acting) 

Ruth H. Young, A.B., Wellesley College, 1944; M.S.S.W., The Catholic University of 
America, 1949; D.S.W. 1965 

Vice President for General Administration 

Warren W. Brandt, B.S., Michigan State University, 1944; Ph.D. University of Illinois, 
1949. 

Vice President for Graduate Studies and Research 

David S. Sparks, B.A., Grinnell College, Iowa, 1944; M.A. University of Chicago, 
1945; Ph.D., 1951. 

Vice President for Agricultural Affairs and Legislative Relations 
Frank L. Bentz, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland 1942; Ph.D., 1952. 

Vice President for University Development 

Robert G. Smith, B.S., State University of New York at Geneseo, 1952; M.A., Ohio 
University, 1956. 



University of Maryland at Baltimore 

Dean, Dental School 

Errol L. Reese, B.S., Fairmont State College, 1960; M.S. University of Detroit, 1968; 
D.D.S., University of West Virginia, 1963. 

Dean, Graduate School and Interprofessional Studies (Acting) 

Ross W. I. Kessel, M.B., B.S., University of London, 1956; Ph.D., Rutgers, The State 
University, 1960. 

Dean, School of Law 

Michael J. Kelly, B.S., Princeton University, 1959; Ph.D., Cambridge University, 1964; 
LLB., Yale Law School, 1967. 

Dean, School of Medicine 

John M. Dennis, B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; M.D., 1945 

Dean, School of Nursing 

Nan B. Hechenberger, B.S., Villanova University, 1956; M.S., The Catholic University 
of America, 1959; Ph.D., 1974; RN 

Dean, School of Pharmacy 

William J. Kinnard, Jr., B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1953; M.S., 1955; Ph.D., Purdue 
University, 1957. 

56 



Dean, School of Social Work and Community Planning (Acting) 

MalindaB. Orlin, D. A., University of Michigan, 1964; M.S. W., 1966; Ph.D., University 
of Pittsburgh, 1973 

University of Maryland at Baltimore 

Chancellor 

Albin O. Kuhn, B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; Ph.D., 1948 

Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs 

John M. Dennis, B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; M.D., 1945. 

Assistant to the Chancellor 

Roy Borom, B.A., Wooster College, 1959; M.S.S.A., Western Reserve University 
School of Applied Social Sciences, 1951. 

Director of Admissions and Registrations 

Wayne A. Smith, B.S., University of Maryland, 1962. 

Director of Business Services 

Robert C. Brown, B.A., University of Maryland, 1963. 

Director of Health Sciences Computer Center 

Donn Lewis. B.S., University of Maryland, 1973; M.B. A., University of Maryland 1976 

Director of Personnel 

Ronald J. Baril, B.S. Ed., Bridgewater State College, Massachusetts, 1965. 

Director of Student Financial Aid 

James H. Nolan, B.S., University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1965. 

Director of Physical Plant 

Robert L. Walton, B.S., University of Maryland, 1938. 

Director of Student Health Services 

Wilfred H. Townshend, B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1936; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1940. 

Director of University of Maryland Hospital 

G. Bruce McFadden, B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1957; M.H.A., Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia, 1961. 

Director of University Relations 

Louise M. White, A.B., Randolph-Macon Woman's College, 1959; M.L.A., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1965. 

Librarian, Health Sciences Library 

Cyril C. H. Feng, B. A., Tamkang College, Taiwan, 1961; M.S., University of Kentucky, 
1965. 



57 



CAMPUS MAP 




©©» 





yuuj 


kjjjjjofi 



©I 




6 




2o| 


m 









W. PRATT ST ■ 



7r 



BUILDING KEY, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE 




Allied Health Professions Building. 
32 S Greene Street 
Medical Technology. School of 
Pharmacy. Physical Therapy. 
Radiologic Technology classrooms, 
offices, laboratories 
Alpha House. 828 N Eutaw Street 
i off campus) 

Baltimore Union. 621 W Lombard 
Street 

Cafeteria, student housing, meeting 
rooms for students and faculty. 
lounges, game room, Synapse 
Bressler Research Building. 29 S 
Greene Street 

Medical school research labs. Balti- 
more offices of the university's 
Board of Regents 

Walter P Carter Center. 630 W 
Fayette Street 

The university uses this facility 
jointly with the Inner City Mental 
Health Program and the State De 
partment of Mental Hygiene 
Community Pediatnc Center. 412 
W Redwood Street (off campus) 
Innovative program of comprehen 
sive health care for children in 
southwestern health distnct Feder 
ally funded 

Davidge Hall. 522 W Lombard 
Street 

Built in 1812 and designed by Rob- 
ert Carey Long Sr . who used the 
Pantheon in Rome as his model 
The oldest building in the nation 
used continuously for medical edu 
cation The university's Medical 
Alumni Association plans to restore 
the building to its onginal state and 
open it to the public as a medical 

Dunning Hall. 636 W Lombard 
Street 

School of Pharmacy classrooms and 
offices, drug manufactunng lab. poi- 
son information center 



9 Fayette Street Garage, 633 W Fay 
ette Street 

10 Gray Laboratory. 520 Rear W 
Lombard Street 

Physical Therapy Office. Campus 
Police, Center for the Graduate 
Social Work Education of the Hear 

11 ing Impaired 

Hayden-Hams Hall. 666 W Bala 
more Street 

Baltimore College of Dental Sur- 
gery, Dental School, clinics, class- 
rooms, labs, offices 

12 Health Sciences Computer Center, 
610 W Lombard Street 
Computer Center, pharmacy school 
offices and labs. Medical Technol 
ogy labs. Division of Clinical Investi- 
gation. Office of Student Affairs 

13 Health Sciences Library. Ill S 
Greene Street 

Main library for all professional 
schools except the School of Law 
Includes historical book collection 
and computenzed circulation and 
information services 

14. Howard Hall. 660 W Redwood 
Street 

Central Administration offices med 
ical school classrooms, offices labs 

15. Howard Hall Tower. 655 W Balti- 
more Street 

Medical school classrooms, offices. 
labs Administrative offices of (he 
medical school, including the office 
of dean and vice chancellor 

16 Institute of Psychiatry and Human 
Behavior 645 W Redwood Street 
IE. F and G wings of the hospital) 
The medical school's center for psy- 
chiatric teaching and research as 
well as inpatient and outpatient 

17 Kelly Memonal Building. 650 W 
Lombard Street 

Headquarters of Maryland Pharma- 
ceutical Association B Olive Cole 
Museum 



18 Lane Hall 500 W Baltimore Street 
School of Law classrooms, offices, 
library. Developmental Disabilities 
Law Clinic 

19 Legal Services Clinic, 116 N Paca 
Street 

20 Lombard Building 511 W Lom- 
bard Street 

Bookstore University Relations 

21 Maryland Institute for Emergency 
Medical Services. 22 S Greene 
Street 

The first major trauma program in 
the nation, combining multidiscipli 
nary teaching and research with ex 
pen round -the-clock care for the 
critically ill and injured in the state 

22 Medical School Teaching Facility. 
10 S Pine Street 

Medical school classrooms, offices, 
research labs, animal facility Office 
of Medical Education. Illustrative 
Services 

23 Medical Technology Building. 31 S 
Greene Street 

Medical school offices, labs 

24 Mencken House. 1524 Hotlins 
Street (off campus) 

25 Methadone Program. 104 N 
Greene Street (off campus} 

26 National Pituitary Agency. 210 W 
Fayette Street (off campus) 
Under contract with the National 
Institutes of Health, the University 
of Maryland administers the NPA, 
which is the official agency for col 
Section and distnbution of human 
pituitary hormones for research pur- 
poses 

27 Newman Center, 712 W Lombard 
Street 

28 Nilsson House. 826 N Eutaw Street 
(off campus) 

29 Parsons Residence Hall for Women 
622 W Lombard Street 

30 Pratt Street Garage and Athletic Fa 
cility. 646 W Pratt Street 



31 Redwood Hall, 721 W Redwood 
Street 

Division of Alcoholism and Drug 
Abuse offices, clinical areas 

32 School of Nursing Building 655 W 
Lombard Street 

Nursing school classrooms, offices 

33 School of Social Work and Admin- 
istration Building. 525 W Redwood 
Street 

Office of the chancellor School of 
Social Work and Community Plan 
ning classrooms, offices 
34. Slate Medical Examiner's Building, 
1 1 1 Penn Street 

35 Stroke Center. 412 W Redwood 
Street (off campus) 

36 Temporary Academic Building. 601 
Rear W Lombard Street 

School of Social Work and Com 
munity Planning classrooms offices 

37 Tuerk House. 106 N Greene Street 
(off campus) 

Residential facility for alcoholism 
programs of the University of Mary 
land Hospital (Also Alpha and Nils 
son Houses ) 

38 University College, 520 W Lorn 
bard Street 

Offers degree and non-degree edu- 
cational programs Juvenile Law 
Clinic 

39 University Garage. 701 W Red 
wood Street 

Helistop 

40 University of Maryland Hospital, 22 
S Greene Street 

41 Western Health Clime, 700 W 
Lombard Street 

42 Whitehurst Hall. 624 W Lombard 
Street 

Graduate School office, nursing, 
pharmacy social work and commu- 
nity planning offices, classrooms 



58 



Statement of Affirmative Action 

The University of Maryland is an equal opportunity institution with respect to both 
education and employment. The University's policies, programs and activities are in 
conformance with pertinent federal and state laws and regulations on nondescrimination 
regarding race, color, religion, age, national origin, sex and handicap. Inquiries regarding 
compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, Title IX of the 
1972 Education Amendments, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, or related 
legal requirements should be directed to the Office of the Chancellor. 

Statement of Student Privacy Acts 

In accordance with "The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974" (P.L. 93- 
380), popularly referred to as the "Buckley Amendment", disclosure of student infor- 
mation, including financial and academic, is restricted. Release to anyone other than 
the student requires a written waiver from the student. A full policy statement is found 
in the current "Information Guide for Students and Faculty." 

The School of Pharmacy stands ready as it has in the past, to assist the handicapped 
individual in the completion of the professional and graduate programs within the School 
of Pharmacy. The School will make itself available to all those handicapped individuals 
who can function adequately within the professional framework of the profession. 

The University of Maryland seeks to provide equal educational opportunities without 
regard to race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, or handicap. This policy extends 
to employment, admission, and all programs and activities supported by the University. 

The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract 
between the student and the University of Maryland. Changes are effected from time 
to time in the general regulations and in the academic requirements. There are estab- 
lished procedures for making changes, procedures which protect the institution's integrity 
and the individual student's interest and welfare. When the actions of a student are 
judged by competent authority, using established procedure, to be detrimental to the 
interests of the University community, that person may be required to withdraw from 
the University. 



59 






\ ' 



/ 




UNIVERSITY 

OF MARYLAND 

SCHOOL OF 

PHARMACY 



1984-86 Catalog and 130th Announcement 



Volume 53 

Number 1 

March, 1984 



Maryland College of Pharmacy, 1841-1904 






< *9 



mm 




CONTENTS 



3 



The School and Its Environment 

The School 

The University of Mankind at 



Baltimore 


7 


Baltimore 


7 


Academic Information 




Academic Sessions 


8 


Academic Kegulatii ins 


8 


Grading System 


8 


Honors and Awards 


8 


Memorial Lecture Series 


9 


Academic Status Policies 


9 


Determination of In-State Status 


10 


Privacy of Student Records 


10 


I landicapped Students 


10 


Student Services 




Student Health 


11 


Housing 


11 


Student Government Alliance (SGA) 


11 


American Pharmaceutical Association 




and Mankind Pharmaceutical 




Association Student Chapter 


11 


Student National Pharmaceutical 




Association 


11 


Fi) tancial I> formation 




Fees and Expenses, 1983-84 


12 


Financial Aid 


12 



Licensure Requirement oi the 
Mankind Board of Pharmacy 

Statement on Moral Character of 
Applicants 



19 
19 



Doctor of Pharmacy Program 19 

Professional Degree Courses 

'Clinical Pharmacy (PCLN) 21 
Medicinal Chemistn-Pharmaci >gnosy 

(MCPG) 22 

Pharmaceutics (PIL\R) 23 

Pharmacology and Toxicology (PCOL) 24 
Pharmacy Practice and Administrative 

Science (PPAS) 2S 

Interdepartmental Courses (PHMY) 2" 

Graduate Degree Programs 

Medicinal Chemistn-Pharmacognosv 

(MCPG) 29 

Pharmaceutics (PHAR) 32 

Pharmacology and Toxicology (PCOL) 3S 
Pharmacy Practice and Administrative 

Science ( PPAS ) 38 



Administration and Faculty 

University of Mankind 43 

University of Mankind at Baltimore 43 

School of Pharmacy 43 



Intercampus Programs 

Honors Programs, University of 

Mankind Eastern Shore (UMES) 
Dual Degree Program, Coppin State 

College 
Dual Degree Honors Program, 

Morgan State University 
Dual Degree Program with Bowie 

State College 



13 
13 
13 

13 



Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 
Program 

Admission IS 

Application Deadline l" 7 

Curriculum 17 

Employment Prospects 18 



Statement of Faculty, Student and 
Institutional Rights and 
Responsibilities for Academic 
Integrity 46 



Campus Map 



48 



THE SCHOOL AND ITS 
ENVIRONMENT 



5 



The School 

The Maryland College of Pharmacy, the oldest 
pharmacy school in the south, gave its first 
lectures in November, 1841. Throughout its 
history the school has provided local and 
national leadership for the profession. 

Among its more noteworthy achieve- 
ments are involvements with the founding of 
the American Association of Colleges of Phar- 
macy to formulate uniform standards for the 
graduation of pharmacy students and the 
development of the American Council for 
Pharmaceutical Education, the current ac- 
creditation body for schools of pharmacy. 

Primarily existing as an independent in- 
stitution until 1904, the Mankind College of 
Pharmacy then became the Department of 
Pharmacy of the University of Mankind and 
in 1920, merged with Mankind State College 
(College Park) to form the state university. 

In 1970, through the joint efforts of the 
school and the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, 
Mankind became the first state to replace the 
unstructured internship program with a pro- 
fessional experience program incorporated in 
the school's curriculum. 

In the summer of 1982, the school 
expanded its educational, research and serv- 
ice programs into a new seven-story facility 
which greatly enhances its ability to evolve 
these programs to better meet the future 
needs of the profession and the health care 
system. 

Accreditation 

The school's Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 
and Doctor of Pharmacy programs are ac- 
credited by the American Council on Phar- 
maceutical Education. The school is a 
member of the American Association of Col- 
leges of Pharmacy and is an accredited pro- 
vider of continuing education. 

Degrees Offered 

The School of Pharmacy offers courses lead- 
ing to the following degrees: Bachelor of 
Science in Pharmacy, Doctor of Pharmacy, 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 



The degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy is conferred upon students who 
successfully complete the preprofessional 
program and the three-year professional pro- 
gram (as outlined later in the catalog). 

The Doctor of Pharmacy degree is con- 
ferred upon students who successfully com- 
plete the preprofessional program, the first 
two years of the Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy program and the two years of the 
Pharm.D. program. Students holding a B.S. in 
pharmacy from an accredited school of phar- 
macy may earn a Pharm.D. degree by success- 
fully completing the two-year Pharm.D. 
program. 

Candidates for advanced degrees ( M.S. 
and Ph.D. ) must register in the Graduate 
School of the university. More detailed infor- 
mation is found in the graduate program 
section of this catalog and in the catalog of 
the Graduate School. 

Service Organizations 

Student Committee on Drug Abuse Educa- 
tion (SCODAE) is a volunteer organization of 
pharmacy students who, with faculty support 
and guidance, are committed to contributing 
their knowledge and personal talents toward 
the development of rational attitudes about 
drugs and sen'ing as a source of unbiased 
information concerning drugs. The group 
believes in presenting relevant data as hon- 
estly as possible to assist people in making 
informed decisions concerning the use of the 
drugs. 

Students learn through experience to 
provide drug education lectures to a variety 
of groups from school children to health 
professionals. SCODAE also allows pharmacy 



6 



students to become involved in other projects 
of drug abuse information dissemination in- 
cluding the drug abuse information tele- 
phone service and the publication of 
SCODAE's newsletter PharmAlert. Mr. An- 
thony Tommasello is the faculty coordinator 
of this group. 

The Elder-Ed Program represents an in- 
novative approach to helping the elderly take 
medications more appropriately. Pharmacy 
students, along with retired pharmacists, re- 
ceive special training regarding the social and 
psychological aspects of drug use among the 
older population as well as the therapeutic 
goals of treatment for prescribed and over- 
the-counter medications. Emphasis is placed 
on developing talks for presentation to com- 
munity groups of elderly; public speaking 
skills are enhanced. Members of the Geriatric 
Committee serve as faculty and also speak to 
both community and professional groups re- 
garding medication use among the senior 
population. Pharmacy students receive aca- 
demic credit for participation and many con- 
tinue to present these programs in their own 
communities following graduation. Ms. 
Madeline Feinberg is the faculty coordinator 
for this service activity. 

The Maryland Poison Center (MPC) is 
the regional poison center for the entire state 
of Maryland. As an emergency telephone 
service, it provides toxicity and treatment 
information to health professionals and the 
general public on a 24 hour basis. Staffed by 
pharmacists and fifth year pharmacy students, 
the center handles approximately 50,000 poi- 
son-related calls each year. Certified as a 
Regional Center by both the American Asso- 
ciation of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) 
and the National Poison Center Network 
(NPCN), the Maryland Poison Center has one 
satellite center, Tri-State Poison Center, lo- 
cated at Sacred Heart Hospital in Cum- 
berland. The MPC was established as the 
central poison center for Maryland in 1966 
and became a part of the University of 
Maryland School of Pharmacy in 1972. Gary 



M. Oderda, Pharm.D., M.P.H., and Wendy 
Klein-Schwartz, Pharm.D., serve as the cen- 
ter's director and assistant director, respec- 
tively. 

The Clinical Pharmacokinetics Labora- 
tory (CPL), a state and federally licensed 
facility, serves the medical community by 
providing an analysis and interpretation of 
the blood concentrations of therapeutic 
drugs, particularly for those with a small 
margin between toxicity and therapeutic 
efficacy such as anticonvulsants, theophylline 
and certain antibiotics. The concentration of 
drug in the blood and other body tissues 
serves as a guide to clinicians in achieving 
optimum therapeutic response in individual 
patients. 

The CPL also provides specialized ana- 
lytical and pharmacokinetic consultations for 
drug concentrations in body fluids for 
clinically oriented research projects and 
clinical trials. Dr. Larry Lesko and Dr. James 
Leslie are the director and assistant director 
of the laboratory. 

Rho Chi Honorary Pharmaceutical Soci- 
ety: Omicron Chapter of Rho Chi, national 
honorary pharmaceutical society, was estab- 
lished at the University of Maryland in 1930. 
Eligibility for membership in the society is 
based on high attainment in scholarship, 
character, personality and leadership. 



7 



The University of Maryland at 
Baltimore 

The professional schools campus, located in 
the heart of metropolitan Baltimore, is an 
inner city campus surrounded by the contem- 
porary health problems and health care sen- 
ice systems so essential to modern health 
care education. The University of Maryland 
Medicial System and its hospital serve as a 
focal point for the education and interaction 
of the students and faculty of the Schools of 
Dentistry, Law, Medicine, Nursing, Social 
Work and Community Planning and the Grad- 
uate School. 

The 36-acre campus is located just west 
of the heart of the city at the head of the 
Baltimore-Washington Parkway. The campus 
and its neighborhoods have gone through, or 
are currently experiencing, the spirit of re- 
newal for which the city is famous. 

Health Sciences Library 
The Health Sciences Library serves the 
Schools of Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, 
Nursing, Social Work and Community Plan- 
ning, as well as the Graduate School and 
medical system. The library contains more 
than 250,000 volumes, including 2,800 cur- 
rent journal titles, and is ranked in size 
among the top IS health sciences libraries in 
the country. 

The Computerized Online Catalog en- 
ables one to look for library materials by 
title, author, subject, key word, call number, 
series, meeting name and organization name. 
In addition to giving information on library 
holdings, the system tells whether or not the 
material has been checked out of the library. 
The Online Catalog can be accessed from any 
computer terminal on the UMAB campus that 
is hooked into the Professional Schools Com- 
puter Center, as well as from any dial access 
terminal. 

Information specialists in the CRABS 
(Computerized Referenced and Bibliographic 
Services) office will execute online comput- 
erized literature searches on over 30 
databases, including MEDLINE, Biological Ab- 
stracts, Chemical Abstracts and Psychological 
Abstracts, for a nominal fee. 



Professional Schools Computer Center 

The Instructional and Research Computer 
I 'nit. a component of the Professional 
Schools Computer Center, is part of the 
University of Maryland Instruction and Re- 
search Computing Network. An IBM 43^1 and 
a Univac 11S2 (located at College Park) are 
available to students through terminals lo- 
cated in the unit. The system has capabilities 
to use Basic, Fortran, Pascal and PL-1 lan- 
guages; and to program statistical analysis 
packages SPSS, SAS and BMDP. 

The Academic Services Division of the 
Instructional and Research Computer Unit 
offers a one-credit elective course and other 
noncredit courses on programming and com- 
puter applications. These are designed to 
help students use the center to full advantage. 

Baltimore 

Baltimore city itself, the ninth largest in the 
country, combines a strong sense of its long 
history and its culture evidenced in its many 
museums, libraries, symphony, opera and 
theatres. Sport fans know it as the home of 
the Orioles and the Colts. Nearby Chesapeake 
Bay offers easy access to a variety of recrea- 
tional activities, not the least being enjoyment 
of its seafood. Baltimore is also distinguished 
and immensely enriched by the many well 
known institutions of higher learning, in 
addition to the university, which are located 
both in the city and in the nearby metro- 
politan area. 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 



Academic Sessions 

The school calendar operates on a three-term 
basis. The fall term, four months in length, 
ends prior to the Christmas recess. The 
winter term, three weeks in length, allows 
students to avail themselves of tutorial serv- 
ices or elective courses. The spring term, 
four months in length, begins during the final 
week in January. 

Academic Regulations 

Each student is responsible for his/her own 
progress in his work; instructors will make 
appointments for a formal conference about 
work upon request. Each student is assigned 
an academic faculty counselor for personal as 
well as academic problems. Students should 
not delay the discussion of such problems 
until such time as correction is difficult or 
impossible. Each class is assigned a class 
advisor who not only functions as an aca- 
demic counselor but also coordinates the 
overall activities and performance of the 
class. 

Grading System 

The standard grading system is used: 

Grade Interpretation Point Value 

A Excellent 4 

B Good 3 

C Fair 2 

D Poor but Passing 1 

F Failure 

I Incomplete Replaced by defi- 

nite grade when 
course require- 
ments have been 
met. 
In computing scholastic averages only the 
grades earned in those courses taken in 
residence at the University of Maryland are 
considered. When, for any reason, a course is 
repeated, the final mark is used. 

Honors and Awards 

University Scholarship Honors: Final honors 
for excellence in scholarship are awarded to 
not more than one-fifth of the graduating 
class in the School of Pharmacy. To be 
eligible for honors, pharmacy students must 



complete at Baltimore at least two academic 
years of resident work applicable to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 
with an average of "B" (30) or higher. Those 
in the first tenth of the class will graduate 
with high honors and those in the second 
tenth of the class with honors. 
School of Pharmacy Gold Medal for General 
Excellence: Awarded annually to the candi- 
date for the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy who has attained the highest gen- 
eral average, provided that this average is not 
below the grade of B. 

Certificates of Honor: Honorable mention is 
made annually of the first three students of 
the graduating class having the highest gen- 
eral averages, provided these averages do not 
fall below the grade of B. Only courses taken 
at the School of Pharmacy at Baltimore are 
considered in awarding these honors. 
L.S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize: 
Awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly of 
the School of Pharmacy to the student having 
the highest general average throughout the 
course in practical and dispensing pharmacy. 
Andrew G. DuMez Medal: Awarded annually 
by the Faculty Assembly to a candidate for the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 
for superior proficiency in pharmacy. 
The Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize: 
Awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly to 
the fifth-year student who has performed 
exceptionally throughout the course in phar- 
macognosy. 

Dr. and Mrs. Frank J. Slama Award: An annual 
award presented by the Faculty Assembly to a 
fifth-year student for superior work in the 
field of biopharmacognosy 
William Simon Memorial Prize: Awarded an- 
nually by the Faculty Assembly to a candidate 
for the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy who has done superior work in the 
fields of practical and analytical chemistry. 



9 



Wagner Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence Prize: 
Awarded annually by the Faculty Assembly to 
a fifth-year student for meritorious achieve- 
ment in pharmaceutical jurisprudence. 
John F. Wannenwetsch Memorial Prize: 
Awarded to the graduating student majoring 
in general pharmacy who has exhibited ex- 
ceptional performance and promise in the 
practice of community pharmacy. 
Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity 
Prize: Given to a senior student for profi- 
ciency in pharmacology. 
Epsilon Alumnae Chapter, Lambda Kappa 
SigmaCole Award: Given to a senior student 
for proficiency in pharmacy administration. 
Maryland Society for Hospital Pharmacists 
Award: Given to a senior student who shows 
promise in the area of hospital pharmacy. 
Frank J. Slama Award by the School's Alumni 
Association: Given to a graduating student 
who has excelled in extracurricular activities. 
Maryland Pharmaceutical Society Award: 
Given to outstanding senior minority stu- 
dents. 

Memorial Lecture Series 

Andrew G. DuMez Memorial Lecture: In 

1969, Mrs. Andrew G DuMez established at 
the school an endowed lectureship as a 
memorial to her late husband, Dr. Andrew G 
DuMez, Dean of the University of Mankind 
School of Pharmacy from 1926 to 19-48, and a 
distinguished educator and leader in phar- 
macy in Maryland, the United States and 
internationally. 

Francis S. Balasonne Memorial Lecture: The 

Mankind Pharmaceutical Association and the 
University of Maryland Pharmacy Alumni As- 
sociation endowed a lectureship as a memo- 
rial to Francis S. Balasonne, a 19-40 graduate 
of the school, a past president of the Alumni 
Association, a distinguished former faculty 
member and a past president of the National 
Association of Boards of Pharmacy. 

Ellis Grollman Lectures in Pharmaceutical 
Sciences: In 1983, Mrs. Evelyn Grollman 
Glick endowed a lecture program as a me- 
morial to her brother, Ellis Grollman, a 
graduate of the school in the class of 1926. 



The lecturers are nationally recognized re- 
searchers in the pharmaceutical or related 
basic sciences. 

Academic Status Policies 

The academic stattis of each student is re- 
viewed at the end of each semester by the 
Student Affairs Committee of the Faculty As- 
sembly. The committee recommendations 
and decisions are subject to approval by the 
Faculty Assembly. 

Students must maintain a cumulative 
grade point average of 2.000 or higher. Any 
student who fails to maintain this average wil 
be placed on probation during the next 
semester. Any student who has been on 
probation for one semester and then obtains 
a probation average for a second semester 
will have the following options, if allowed to 
continue in the program: to continue in 
pharmacy school on a reduced load; or to 
continue in school on a full load on the 
understanding that academic dismissal is 
mandatory should his/her cumulative grade 
point average still be below 2.000 at the end 
of the following semester. 

Students who fail one or more courses 
will be subject to being placed on probation 
or academically dismissed, depending upon 
an academic review of their record by the 
Student Affairs Committee. 




10 



Students must have a cumulative grade 
point average of not less than 2.000 for entry 
into the required program of the fifth year. 
Students in the fifth year class must maintain 
a grade average of 2.000 to become eligible 
for graduation. 

Reduced Academic Load Program Policies: 
Students who are on reduced load must 
complete their outstanding coursework on a 
two for one basis, i.e., a maximum of two 
semesters to complete the equivalent of one 
semester on full load. An average of 2.000 
must be maintained in the courses a student 
is taking on reduced load. Failure to maintain 
this average in any one semester will result 
in academic dismissal. Students on reduced 
load must take advantage of tutorial as- 
sistance, if available. Students cannot enter 
their fifth year on reduced load. Students in 
the fourth year on a reduced load may take 
fifth year electives but no required or profes- 
sional experience program courses. 
Academic Dismissal: A student may appeal 
the Faculty Assembly's decision by writing to 
the chairperson of the Student Affairs Com- 
mittee and has the right to present his/her 
case in person before the committee. The 
decision on the appeal is forwarded by the 
committee to the Faculty Assembly. If the 
appeal is denied, the student has the right to 
appeal directly to the Dean, who may allow 
or reject the appeal but must inform the 
Faculty Assembly of his decision at the next 
assembly meeting. This latter decision is the 
final decision of the School of Pharmacy. 

Academic dismissal is a process which is 
not completed and does not take effect until 
the student has had an opportunity to exhaust 
the appeal process. This process must be 
completed before the beginning of the next 
semester. 



After some form of remediation, a stu- 
dent who has been academically dismissed 
once may petition the admissions subcommit- 
tee for reinstatement. A student who has 
been academically dismissed twice is not 
eligible for reinstatement. 

Determination of In-State Status 

An initial determination of in-state status for 
admission, tuition and charge-differential pur- 
poses will be made by the university at the 
time a student's application for admission is 
under consideration. The determination 
made at that time, and any determination 
made thereafter, shall prevail in each se- 
mester until the determination is successfully 
challenged. Students classified as in-state for 
admission, tuition and charge-differential pur- 
poses are responsible for notifying the Office 
of Admissions and Registrations of the Bal- 
timore campus, in writing, within fifteen days 
of any change in their circumstances which 
might in anv way affect their classification at 
I'MAB. 

The determination of in-state status for 
admission, tuition and charge-differential pur- 
poses is the responsibility of the Office of 
Admissions and Registrations, UMAB. Copies 
of the university's policy are available from 
this office. 

Privacy of Student Records 

In accordance with the "Familv Education 
Rights and Privacy Act of 1974" (P.L. 93-380), 
popularly referred to as the "Buckley Amend- 
ment," disclosure of student information, in- 
cluding financial and academic, is restricted. 
Release to anyone other than the student 
requires a written waiver from the student. A 
full policy statement is found in the current 
"Information Guide for Students and Faculty." 

Handicapped Students 

The School of Pharmacy is eager to assist the 
handicapped individual in the completion of 
the professional and graduate programs 
within the School of Pharmacy. The school 
will make itself available to all those handi- 
capped individuals who can function ade- 
quately within the professional framework. 



STUDENT SERVICES 



11 






Student Health 

Student health care is provided by the Cam- 
pus Health Sen ices for a fee of $-t().00 per 
annum, payable at registration in September. 
At the beginning of the entering year, stu- 
dents must provide completed physical exam- 
ination forms from their family physician or 
from Campus Health Services. 

All students are required to earn - Blue 
Cross hospitalization insurance or its equiv- 
alent. In addition, it is recommended that all 
students earn' Blue Shield insurance, or its 
equivalent, to cover physicians' and surgeons' 
fees. Additional information regarding Cam- 
pus Health Services may be obtained in the 
Office of Administration of the School of 
Pharmacy. 

Housing 

The University of Mankind at Baltimore of- 
fers both apartment and dormitory-style ac- 
commodations for students. For information 
concerning housing, contact the Division of 
Residence Life, University of Maryland at 
Baltimore, 621 West Lombard Street, Bal- 
timore, Mankind 21201. 

Student Government Alliance 
(SGA) 

The Student Government Alliance of the 
School of Pharmacy is an organization of 
undergraduate students established to aid in 
the internal administration of the school, to 
organize all extracurricular programs and 
activities of the student body and to coordi- 
nate these programs and activities with those 
of the faculty and administration to foster 
mutual understanding and cooperation. The 
Executive Council is composed of the presi- 
dents of the respective classes and one dele- 
gate elected from each undergraduate class. 



American Pharmaceutical 
Association and Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Association 
Student Chapter 

The purpose of the American Pharmaceutical 
Association and the Maryland Pharmaceutical 
Association Student Chapter is to encourage 
in the broadest and most liberal manner the 
advancement of pharmacy as a science and as 
a profession in accordance with the objec- 
tives stated in the constitution of these two 
associations, especially in fostering education 
in matters involving pharmacy in all of its 
branches and its application and aiding in 
promoting the public health and welfare. 

Student National 
Pharmaceutical Association 

The purposes of this organization are to help 
the minority student maintain the expected 
academic level; provide the minority student 
with an organization that can deal with prob- 
lems facing pharmacy and pharmacists in this 
country; plan, organize, supplement, coordi- 
nate and execute comprehensive programs to 
improve the health, education and social 
environment of minority groups in Mankind. 
Although its membership is not limited to 
minority students, the SNPHA chapter hopes 
to provide the health-oriented minority stu- 
dent with an opportunity to achieve greater 
self-awareness and a larger representation in 
the School of Pharmacy and to make the 
community more aware of the minority- 
group's health problems. 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 



Fees and Expenses, 1983—84 



Tuition and Fees 




Per Year 


In-State (B.S. Program) 




$1,084.00 


(Pharm.D. Program) 




1,500.00 


Out-of-State (B.S. Program) 




3,479.00 


(Pharm.D. Program) 




4,014.00 


Part-time Undergraduate, per credit 




(8 credits or less) 




64.00 


Instructional Resources Pee 






(Full- or part-time) 




44.00 


Supporting Facilities Fee (Pull-time) 


100.00 


(Part-time) 




22.00 


Student Activities Fee (Full- or p; 


art-time) 1500 


Student Health Fee (Full-time ) 




40.00 


( Part-time ) 




20.00 


Health Insurance (Blue Cross)* 






One Person 




173.04 


Two Persons 




332.76 


Family 




447.00 


Clinical Clerkship Fee 




175.00 


Housing 




805.00-925.00 



* Health insurance is required of all full-time 
professional school students (nine or more 
semester hours) in addition to the Student Health 
Fee. A student with equivalent insurance coverage 
must provide proof 6f such membership to his 
dean at the time of registration and obtain a 
hospital insurance waiver 




Other Fees and Expenses 

Application Fee 

(nonreturnable) $ 20.00 

Books and Supplies, approximately 280.00 

Change in Registration Fee 

(after first week) 10.00 

Deposit upon Acceptance for Admission 

(nonreturnable) 50.00 

Graduation Fee 

(to be paid in February of the fifth year) 20.00 
Late Registration Fee 25.00 

Matriculation Fee 

( new students ) 28.00 

Professional Liability Insurance Fee* 9.75 

The university reserves the right to make such 
changes in fees and other changes as may be 
found necessary; a/though even' effort will be 
made to keep the cost to the student as low as 
possible. 

"Required during professional experience program 
and clinical experience. 

Financial Aid 

Student financial aid programs are centrally 
administered by the Division of Financial Aid, 
located in the Baltimore Student Union. The 
main purpose of the program is to help 
students who otherwise would be unable to 
attend the university. To qualify for aid, you 
must apply annually and meet certain eligibil- 
ity requirements. 

Aid packages often include a combina- 
tion of loans, grants, scholarships and work- 
study designed to meet 100% of a student's 
need. Usually, 30-50% of the need can be 
met with grant assistance; the balance is met 
with loan or work-study funds. Out-of-state 
residents may find a lower percentage of 
their need met, since many of the programs 
are restricted to residents of Maryland. 



INTERCAMPUS PROGRAMS 



13 



Honors Programs, University of 
Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES) 

The University of Maryland Eastern Shore, in 
cooperation with the professional schools of 
the University of Maryland at Baltimore, has 
instituted an honors program for students of 
great promise and ability who can meet 
rigorous academic standards. The program 
includes specific preprofessional tracks in 
medicine, dentistry, law, pharmacy, nursing 
and social work and community planning. 

The program of study consists primarily 
of honors sections in biology, chemistry, 
English, mathematics and social sciences. It 
also emphasizes independent study courses 
and honors seminars through which students 
explore in depth various academic disci- 
plines. 

Admission to the program is based on a 
combination of predictive factors, which in- 
clude the high school record, SAT scores. 
interviews, a personal statement written at the 
time of the interview and letters of recom- 
mendation. Special attention is given to mi- 
norities and students from geographical areas 
traditionally underserved by the professions. 

For additional information, write to the 
Chairman of the Honors Program Committee, 
University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Prin- 
cess Anne, Maryland 21853. 

Dual Degree Program, Coppin 
State College 

The dual degree pharmacy program between 
Coppin State College and the School of 
Pharmacy is designed to: 

1. Give Coppin prepharmacy students a 
broad liberal arts education with a strong 
background in chemistry. 

2. Increase the pool of well-prepared, pre- 
pharmacy students entering the University 
of Maryland School of Pharmacy. 

3. Increase the number of disadvantaged stu- 
dents graduating from UMAB at an accept- 
able level required for the practice of 
pharmacy. 

4. Provide selected students with the oppor- 
tunity to earn two baccalaureate degrees, a 
B.S. in general science from Coppin State 
College (at the end of the fourth year of 



the program, the first year at Mankind) 
and a B.S. in pharmacy from the University 
of Mankind School of Pharmacy (at the 
end of the sixth year). 

Dual Degree Honors Program, 
Morgan State University 

The 5/5 honors program between Morgan 
State University and the School of Pharmacy 
is designed for prepharmacy honors students. 
Students enrolled in the program will spend 
three years of intensive study in prepharmacy 
(preprofessional chemistry track) at Morgan 
and three years in professional school at the 
University of Mankind School of Pharmacy. 
Students will earn a B.S. degree in preprofes- 
sional chemistry from Morgan after complet- 
ing the fourth year of the program, and a B.S. 
in pharmacy from the University of Mankind 
School of Pharmacy after completing the sixth 
year of the program. 

Dual Degree Program with 
Bowie State College 

The dual degree program is designed to: 

1. Give Bowie prepharmacy students a broad 
liberal arts education with a strong back- 
ground in chemistry. 

2. Increase the pool of well-prepared stu- 
dents entering the School of Pharmacy. 

3. Increase the number of black students 
graduating from the School of Pharmacy. 

4. Provide selected students with the oppor- 
tunity to earn two baccalaureate degrees, a 
B.S. from Bowie State College (at the end 
of the fourth year of the program, the first 
year at UMAB) and a B.S. in pharmacy 
from the School of Pharmacy (upon suc- 
cessful completion of the professional pro- 
gram in Baltimore). 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
PHARMACY PROGRAM 



15 



The three-year program, offered on the Bal- 
timore campus, has been divided into two 
parts: the first two years of the program 
being a basic science sequence and the final 
year primarily clinical in design. By dividing 
the program in this manner, students may 
select career options after completing the 
first two years, then move into the clinical 
year to receive a B.S. in Pharmacy and fulfill 
requirements for licensure or move into the 
Doctor of Pharmacy program. During the 
program, students complete 76 credits of 
required courses, 14 credits of professional 
experience (PEP) and a minimum of 10 
elective credits for a total of at least 100 
credits. 

The clinical year consists of five months 
of professional experience or clinical clerk- 
ship ( 12 credits) plus eight credits of re- 
quired course work and 10 credits of 
electives. The required course work includes 
courses in pharmaceutics, pharmacy practice 
and clinical toxicology. The five months of 
professional experience are divided into two 
months of required time plus three months 
of elective time. The two-month required 
clerkships and the one-month rotation re- 
quired in the summer after the first profes- 
sional year are divided equally among 
community pharmacy, institutional pharmacy 
and patient care. The final three months are 
elective in the area that the student desires to 
follow as a career. 

The community practice segment is 
served in a community pharmacy under a 
preceptor who has faculty rank in the school. 
This pharmacist is selected by the school and 
his/her practice must achieve certain require- 
ments to be accepted. The student follows a 
structured program in the preceptor's prac- 
tice, and his performance is evaluated by 
both the preceptor and the school. The 
institutional practice segment centers around 
distributive functions in hospitals ranging 
from the University of Maryland Medical Sys- 
tem/Hospital and the Johns Hopkins Hospital 
to community hospitals throughout the state. 



The segment of patient care is hospital expe- 
rience time in patient care areas. Students 
will be involved in developing drug histories 
of patients, overseeing drug administration to 
the patient, noting adverse drug reactions, 
going on rounds with medical staff, providing 
drug information to the physician and other 
specialized conference activities. This pro- 
gram is under the supervision of the clinical 
pharmacy department of the school. Other 
patient care areas involve the counseling of 
patients in the outpatient clinic, the dental 
clinic and other patient care facilities in 
Baltimore. Completion of the professional 
experience program will be accepted by the 
Maryland Board of Pharmacy as meeting the 
internship requirements necessary for licen- 
sure. 

Admission 

The University of Maryland seeks to enroll 
students with diversified backgrounds in 
order to make the educational experience 
more meaningful for each student. Candi- 
dates seeking admission to the School of 
Pharmacy should write to the Dean's Office, 
University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, 
20 N. Pine Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 
Applicants who wish advice on any problem 
relative to their application should call the 
office at (301) 528-7650. 




Prerequisites 

Applicants must present evidence of having 
successfully completed the required pre- 
professional program, or be enrolled in the 
final semester leading to completion of that 
program. In general, the preprofessional 
course requirements are: 
Course Credits 
English 6 
Math (Precalculus/Calculus I) 6-7 
Zoology or Biology' 4 

General Chemistry 8 

Organic Chemistry 8-10 
Physics 8 



40-43 



An additional 17 to 20 credits in humanities, 
social sciences and free electives must be 
earned to total a minimum of 60 credits. In 
addition, applicants must take the Pharmacy 
College Admissions Test (PCAT) and submit 
the test results with the other records re- 
quired by the application. 



All correspondence referring to entrance 
into the preprofessional program of the 
school should be directed to an accredited 
junior or senior college with an appropriate 
prepharmacy curriculum. In the case of the 
University of Maryland campuses, contact: 
College Park (UMCP) 

Director of Admissions 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Maryland 20742 
Baltimore County Campus (UMBC) 

Office of Admissions 

University of Maryland Baltimore County 

5401 Wilkens Avenue 

Catonsville, Maryland 21228 
Eastern Shore Campus (UMES) 

Director of Admissions 

University of Maryland Eastern Shore 

Princess Anne, Maryland 21853 
Address all correspondence concerning en- 
trance to the professional programs to the 
University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, 
20 N. Pine Street,' Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

Applicant Selection Procedures 
An admissions subcommittee consisting of 
faculty members and representatives of the 
student body considers all applicants meeting 
the prerequisites. The subcommittee consid- 
ers the applicant's academic achievement; 
extracurricular activities, personal charac- 
teristics, determined by interviews by the 
subcommittee members; and scores on the 
Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT). 
Academic achievement and/or high scores on 
the PCAT do not in themselves ensure accept- 
ance. Also of concern to the committee are 
the professional and social awareness, com- 
munication skills, integrity, maturity and moti- 
vation of the applicant. While a minimal QPA 
of 2.25 (A = 4.0) is required for application 
consideration, the average QPA of entering 
students is approximately 30. This, coupled 
with the multiple applications for each avail- 
able position in the entering class, gives 
those applicants with QPAs below 2.5 ex- 
tremely low probabilities for admission. 



17 



Attrition Rate 

Over the past two years the attrition rate at 
the School of Pharmacy has been 12.2%. This 
figure includes both academic dismissals and 
voluntary withdrawals from the program. 
For the classes of 1982 and 1983. 

Admitted 188 100.0% 

Graduated 148 78.7% 

Still in Program 17 9.0% 

Dismissed/Withdrew 23 12.2% 

This indicates an increased attrition rate over 
the classes of 1980 and 1981, which experi- 
enced a rate of 8.1%. 

Application Deadline 

All applications must be received by April 1 
and all supportive records necessary for com- 
pletion of the total application received by 
May 1. It is the responsibility of the applicant 
to ensure that all these records are filed with 
the Admissions Office. 

Curriculum 

Third Year (First Professional Year) 

FALL SESSION CREDITS 



MCPG 333 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry I 


3 


MCPG 431 


Biochemistry I 


3 


PPAS 333 


Pharmacy Practice I 


2 


PHMY 335 


Human Biology I 


4 


PHMY331 


Mathematics & Statistics for 
Pharmaceutical Science 


2 


PHMY 333 


Pharmacy Skills Lab 


2 



Total credits 
WINTER 

Optional electives available 
SPRING 



16 



V 'MMER SESSION 

(one of the following required courses) 
Professional Experience (Clinical Clerkship) 

PPAS 360 Community Practice I 2 

PPAS 361 Institutional Practice 1 2 

Fourth Year (Second Professional 
Year) 

FALL SESSION 

PHMY 431 Pharmacology & Therapeutics 1 4 
PPAS 433 Pharmacy Management I 2 

PPAS 431 Pharmacy Practice II 2 

MCPG 461 Pharmaceutical Chemistry II 3 
PHAR 431 Pharmaceutics I 3 

PHMY 433 Pharmacy Skills Lab III 3 

Total credits 1 7 

WINLER 

Optional electives and interprofessional 
courses available 

SPRING SESSION 

PHMY 432 Pharmacology & Therapeutics II 4 

PPAS 434 Pharmacy Management II 2 

PPAS 432 Pharmacy Practice III 2 

MCPG 462 Pharmaceutical Chemistry III 3 

PHAR 432 Pharmaceutics II 3 

PHM\' 434 Pharmacy Skills Lab IV 3 

Total credits 1 7 



MCPG 432 Biochemistrv II 



PPAS 332 Medical Care Organization 

PHMY 336 Human Biology II 

MCPG 334 Pharmaceutical Microbiology 

PHMY 337 Principles of Drug Action 

PHMY 334 Pharmacy Skills Lab 



Total credits 



18 



18 



Fifth Year (Third Professional Year) 

SUMMER (JUNE-AUGUST) 
Professional Experience (Select 2 or 3 of the 
following courses; PPAS 368 and PPAS 369 
may be repeated. ) 



PCLN 362 


Patient Care I 


4 


PPAS 368 


Community Practice II 


2 


PPAS 369 


Institutional Practice II 


2 


PPAS 363 


Special Studies 


2 


Total credits 
FALL SESSION 


4-8 


PHAR 442 


Pharmaceutics III 


2 


PHMY 444 


Pharmacy Practice Pv 


3 


PCLN 451 


Clinical Toxicology 


2 


PHMY435 


Pharmacy Skills Lab V 


1 



Total credits 



8 



Electives: A total of 10 credits of elective 

courses is required for graduation. 

WINTER (JANUARY) 

Optional electives, interprofessional courses 

and professional experience 

SPRING SESSION 

A minimum of two professional experience 
courses must be taken during the spring 
session. A maximum of four professional 
experience courses may be taken during the 
term. Normally a student selects his/her final 
two professional experiences and completes 
the remainder of the 10 credits of elective 
courses required for graduation from the B.S. 
in Pharmacy program. 

Summary 1 of the B.S. in Pharmacy 
Program 

Credits 

Required courses 76 

Professional experience 14 

Electives 10 minimum 

100 



Professional Experience Program 

The Professional Experience Program (PEP) 
offers structured experiential training in a 
variety of practice settings. Six four-week 
units develop in the student the judgment, 
competencies and skills necessary to practice 
in a broad range of health care environments. 
One unit (Community' Practice I or Institu- 
tional Practice I ) is required during the 
summer following the first professional year. 
The remaining units ( Patient Care I, Commu- 
nity Practice II, Institutional Practice II and 
Special Studies) are taken during the summer 
following the second professional year and 
the Winter and Spring semesters of the third 
professional year. A cumulative grade point 
average of 2.0 or greater is required for 
participation. Compensation to the student 
for PEP work is not permitted. 

Employment Prospects 

The most recent study on pharmacy salary 
and employment conditions in the state was 
done by the Maryland Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion in December 1982.* 
Source of Employment 

Community Pharmacy 78.4% 

Hospital Pharmacy 12.9% 

Other 8.6% 

Average Salary by Age 

Age Salary 

21-25 $28,707 

26-30 28,665 

31-35 31,759 

36-40 31,133 

The average full-time salary for the state was 
$31,002. Classified ads and inquiries to the 
school's placement service indicate that job 
opportunities exist in community and hospi- 
tal pharmacies. 

*Wampler, W.R., "Salary and Employment 
Conditions Survey," The Maryland Pharmacist, 50: 
5, 1983. 



19 



Licensure Requirement of the 
Maryland Board of Pharmacy 

Any person of good moral character, 
who presents satisfactory evidence to the 
Mankind Board of Pharmacy that he or she 
has had at least four years standard high 
school training or its equivalent, is a graduate 
of a reputable school or college of pharmacy 
approved by the board and accredited by the 
American Council on Pharmaceutical Educa- 
tion, has served an approved internship, and 
has passed a board examination shall be 
registered as a pharmacist and be given a 
certificate of such regisration. Persons must 
pay a fee of $85 and turn in the application 
to the secretary of the board at least 10 days 
before any stated meeting of the board. 

For further information, please contact 
the secretary of the Mankind Board of Phar- 
macy, 201 West Preston Street, Baltimore, 
Man-land 21201. 

Statement on Moral Character 
of Applicants 

The licensing of pharmacists by an agency of 
the state in which the pharmacist intends to 
practice represents a public trust in that 
individual. In view of this, the public has a 
right to certain expectations of honesty and 
good character in those upon whom this trust 
has been bestowed. Thus, the School of 
Pharmacy will accept only applicants of good 
moral character. Criminal arrests and convic- 
tions ( including but not limited to violations 
of laws pertaining to drugs) as well as other 
criteria may be relied upon by the School of 
Pharmacy in evaluating the moral character of 
applicants. A student who provided false or 
incomplete information about arrests or con- 
victions at the time of application may be 
dismissed if the falsehood or omission is 
disclosed to the School of Pharmacy after the 
student's admission. Discipline or dismissal of 
students may result from criminal arrest or 
criminal conviction during the student's en- 
rollment in the School of Pharmacy. 



Doctor of Pharmacy Program 

The Pharm.D. program is a two-year program, 
admitting either B.S. in Pharmacy graduates 
or applicants completing a program equiv- 
alent to the first two years of the school's B.S. 
program. The major emphasis of the program 
is the training of a clinical practitioner to 
function as a therapeutic consultant, a direct 
provider of health care and an educator in 
the clinical use of therapeutic agents. 

The Pharm.D. professional degree is cur- 
rently being revised by the school. For infor- 
mation write: 

Dean's Office 

University of Maryland 

School of Pharmacy 

20 N. Pine Street 

Baltimore, Maryland 21201 






m 




PROFESSIONAL DEGREE COURSES 



21 



Clinical Pharmacy (PCLN) 

Staff: Kerr (Chairman). Harris-Zuckerman, 
Hoopes, Hvizdos, Klein-Schwartz, Long, 
Michocki, Oderda, Roffman, Wiser 
PCLN 346. Pathophysiology (3). Spring 

term. This course will enable students, by 
generally considering broad concepts of dis- 
eased physiologic processes, to relate them to 
specific disease states and to the rationale for 
the therapeutic correction. Emphasis at all 
times will be on disease processes rather 
than on the specifics of a given disease state. 
PCLN 362. Patient Care (4). A required 
professional experience program designed to 
acquaint the pharmacy student with disease 
states and related therapeutics by involve- 
ment in hospital patient care. 
PCLN 435. Introduction to the Poison Cen- 
ter ( 1 ). Fall term. Repeatable up to 2 credits. 
Designed to introduce the student to the 
Man, land Poison Center, its operation and 
resources. Provides the opportunity to de- 
velop and utilize telephone communication 
skills. 

PCLN 448. Special Projects (var. 1-3). 
Independent investigations in the field of 
clinical pharmacy, consisting of library and 
laboratory or field research, seminars and/or 
other assignments appropriate to the prob- 
lem being investigated. 

PCLN 449. Special Group Studies (var. 1-5). 
Repeatable up to 12 credits. Prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. An omnibus course 
permitting experimentation with new or dif- 
ferent subject matter and/or instructional ap- 
proaches. 

PCLN 451. Clinical Toxicology (2). Fall 
term. Deals with the clinical classes of poi- 
soning and includes pharmacological princi- 
ples in treatment of acute poisoning, 
mechanism of toxic actions of drugs and 
household products and responsibilities of 
poison control officers. 



PCLN 461. Therapeutics (3). Fall term. A 
course designed to present basic principles 
of rational drug therapy within the context of 
various pathophysiologic processes which the 
student has already learned. Concurrently, 
salient points in the evaluation of therapeutic 
literature will be discussed. 
PCLN 462. Statistics in Clinical Investigation 
( 1 ). Winter term. The course is designed to 
introduce the student to the elements of 
statistics and demonstrate their application to 
study design with the aim of improving the 
student's ability to evaluate clinical literature. 
PCLN 463. Drug Induced Diseases (2). Fall 
term, consent of coursemaster. Focus is on 
the clinical manifestations and incidence of 
drug reactions; systems affected; differentia- 
tion between idiosyncratic reactions, hyper- 
sensitivity reactions and extensions of 
pharmacologic action; and assessment of drug 
reaction literatures. 

PCLN 570. Clinical Clerkship 1(4). Fall 
term. A professional experience program Lie- 
signed to acquaint the pharmacy student with 
disease states and related therapeutics by 
involvement in hospital patient care. 
PCLN 578. Clinical Clerkship II ( 3 credits/ 
month). Students will work closely with 
clinical pharmacy staff in the areas where 
clinical services exist and would be given 
some direct responsibility in patient-care 
services and in directing undergraduate stu- 
dents in their basic clerkships. Emphasis in 
these experiences would be placed on solv- 
ing specific therapeutic problems, gaining 
clinical experience in the practical problems 
encountered in therapeutics and gaining ex- 
perience in providing drug information. 



22 



PCLN 579. Clinical Clerkship III (3). 

Clerkships for advanced students designed to 
improve the depth of their clinical skills and 
to allow for initial selection of areas of 
specialty. 

PCLN 580, 581. Clinical Therapeutics Semi- 
nar I, II (1,1 ). A seminar designed to provide 
the student with experience in analyzing 
specific patient therapeutic problems through 
formal patient presentation and analysis semi- 
nars conducted by members of the clinical 
pharmacy division and medical personnel. 

Medicinal Chemistry- 
Pharmacognosy (MCPG) 

Staff: Blomster (Chairman), Callery, Krikorian, 
Pogell, Rosier, M. Speedie, Wright, Zenker 
MCPG 333. Pharmaceutical Chemistry I (3). 
Fall term, three lectures. A study of phys- 
icochemical principles related to organic 
functional group chemistry and chemical 
structure leading to an understanding of the 
biological activity of drugs. Specifically in- 
cluded are discussions of the factors which 
affect the absorption and distribution of 
drugs. 

MCPG 334. Pharmaceutical Microbiology 
(4). Spring term, 4 lectures. Prerequisites: 
organic chemistry and MCPG 431. This course 
is designed specifically for pharmacy students 
and includes basic introductory studies on 
microbial structure, physiology and genetics, 
immunology, and practical and theoretical 
considerations of bacteria, molds, yeasts, vi- 
ruses and their involvement in disease pro- 
duction. 

MCPG 431, 432. Biochemistry I & II (3,2). 
Fall term, three lectures; spring term, two 
lectures. Prerequisite: One year of organic 
chemistry. Physical and chemical properties 
and the components of living systems and the 
metabolic processes in health and disease. 
MCPG 440. Community & Environmental 
Health (2). Prerequisite: permission of the 
instructor. A study of the public health facili- 
ties in the community; their impact on health 



care and the disease state as well as the role 
of ecosystems in the health care package. The 
application of statistical and epidemiological 
methods to health problems will be illus- 
trated through lectures and demonstrations. 
MCPG 448. Special Projects (var. 1-3). 
Independent investigations in the field of 
medicinal chemistry-pharmacognosy, consist- 
ing of library and laboratory or field research 
seminars and/or other assignments appropri- 
ate to the problem being investigated. 
MCPG 449. Special Group Studies (var. 
1—5). Repeatable up to 12 credits. Prerequi- 
site: consent of intructor. An omnibus course 
permitting experimentation with new or dif- 
ferent subject matter and/or instruction ap- 
proaches. 

MCPG 452. Antibiotics (2). Prerequisite: 
permission of the instructor. The use of 
antibiotics in treating specific infectious dis- 
eases, sensitivity testing and dosing considera- 
tions, antibiotic utilization review. Extensive 
use is made of current primary literature. 
MCPG 454. Diagnostic and Clinical Micro- 
biology (3). Prerequisite: permission of the 
instructor. Theory and techniques involved in 
clinical and diagnostic applied microbiology, 
particularly in routine serology, diagnostic 
microbiology, immunoelectrophoresis, with 
quality control of parenteral solutions and 
other pharmaceutical preparations with em- 
phasis on sterility methods in the unidose 
concept. 



MCPG 461. Pharmaceutical Chemistry II, 
Chemistry of Medicinal Products (3) Fall 

term, three lectures. Prerequisites: Phar- 
maceutical Chemistry I, Pharmaceutical Micro- 
biology and Principles of Drug Action. An in- 
depth discussion of the chemistry of pres- 
ently used drugs. Included are compounds 
obtained from natural and synthetic sources. 
MCPG 462. Pharmaceutical Chemistry III, 
Chemistry of Medicinal Products (3). Spring 
term, three lectures. Prerequisite: Phar- 
maceutical Chemistry II. A continuation of 
Pharmaceutical Chemistry II. 

Pharmaceutics (PHAR) 

Staff: Shangraw (Chairman), Augsburger (Di- 
rector of Graduate Program ) , Lesko ( Direc- 
tor, Clinical Pharmacokinetics Laboratory), 
Leslie, Hollenbeck, Jackson 
PHAR 431, 432. Pharmaceutics I and II 
(3,3)- Fall & Spring terms. Fourth year, three 
lectures. Prerequisites: Math-Stat for Phar- 
maceutical Science, Pharmacy Practice I, Skills 
Lab I and II, Principles of Drug Action or 
permission of instructor. A study of the basic 
technology involved in small and large scale 
production of pharmaceutical dosage forms 
(first semester: solid and semi-solid dosage 
forms; second semester: solutions and liquid 
dispersion systems). It is also designed to 
increase the understanding of physical-chem- 
ical principles involved in pharmaceutical 
systems and the application of such knowl- 
edge to the problems involved in drug for- 
mulation, preparation, distribution, stability 
and pharmacological action. 
PHAR 442. Pharmaceutics III (2). Fall term. 
Fifth year. This course focuses on formulation 
and the preparation of specialized dosage 
forms: radiopharmaceuticals, sterile dosage 
forms and compounded prescriptions. Drug 
product selection is addressed from a phys- 
iochemical and biopharmaceutical point of 
view. 

PHAR 448. Special Projects (var. 1-3). 

Independent investigations in the field of 
pharmaceutics, consisting of library and labo- 
ratory' or field research, seminars and/or 
other assignments appropriate to the prob- 
lem being investigated. 




PHAR 449. Special Group Studies (var. 1-5). 
Repeatable up to 12 credits. Prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. An omnibus course 
permitting experimentation with new or dif- 
ferent subject matter and/or instructional ap- 
proaches. 

PHAR 451. Advanced Pharmaceutical For- 
mulations & Compounding (2). A study of 
the ingredients and techniques involved in 
the extemporaneous or small scale bulk com- 
pounding of pharmaceutical formulations uti- 
lized in community and hospital pharmacy. 
PHAR 452. Advanced Pharmaceutical For- 
mulations & Compounding Laboratory ( 1 ). 
Laboratory. 



24 



PHAR 453- Cosmetics and Dermatological 
Preparations (2). A presentation of the essen- 
tial components of specialized areas of cos- 
metics and cosmetic-like preparations used in 
pharmacy. The course is designed to famil- 
iarize students with ingredients and processes 
involved in the formulation, manufacture and 
quality control of cosmetics. Lectures and 
topics on the fundamentals of cosmetic law 
and government regulations of importance to 
pharmacists. Planned field trips to the Noxell 
Corporation will acquaint the pharmacy stu- 
dent with the manufacturing operation on a 
commercial scale. 

PHAR 456. Cosmetics and Dermatological 
Preparations Laboratory ( 1 ). Laboratory. 
PHAR 464. Introduction to Industrial Phar- 
macy (2). Introduction to the organization 
and operation of pharmaceutical companies 
with particular emphasis on the development, 




production and quality control of drug prod- 
ucts and the regulatory implications involved 
in both production and sales. 
PHAR 475. Clinical Pharmacokinetics Semi- 
nar ( 1 ). One session per week. The focus of 
this course is the clinically relevant phar- 
macokinetic aspects of drugs whose serum 
concentrations are used as a guide to dosage 
regimen design in patients. The significance 
of disease states, age and drug interactions is 
illustrated by case studies. 
PHAR 485. Advanced Pharmaceutics ( 1 ). 
One lecture per week. A study of specialized 
formulations, dosage forms and drug delivery 
systems designed for the clinical pharmacist 
involving bioavailability, stability and drug 
administration considerations. 
PHAR 502. Advanced Biopharmaceutics (2). 
A clinically oriented in-depth study of the 
factors affecting the time-course of drugs with 
emphasis on the implication and qualification 
of these factors in the disease state. 

Pharmacology and Toxicology 
(PCOL) 

Staff: Khazan (Chairman), Buterbaugh, Eccles, 
El-Fakahaney, Moreton, Weiner 
PCOL 358. Drug Abuse Education (1-3). 
Fall and spring terms. Practice and training in 
the dissemination of drug information, es- 
peciallv drug abuse information, to the pub- 
lic. 

PCOL 448. Special Projects (var. 1-3). 
Independent investigations in the field of 
pharmacology and toxicology, consisting of 
library and laboratory or field research, semi- 
nars and/or other assignments appropriate to 
the problem being investigated. 
PCOL 449. Special Group Studies (var. 1-5). 
Repeatable up to 12 credits. Prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. An omnibus course 
permitting experimentation with new or dif- 
ferent subject matter and/or instructional ap- 
proaches. 



25 



PCOL 452. Principles of Toxicology (2). Fall 
term, two lectures/week with conferences and 
laboratory projects equivalent to one labora- 
tory. Deals with basic principles of investiga- 
tive toxicology and includes toxic effects on 
organ, cell and enzymes systems, forensic 
toxicology and toxicity of classes of com- 
pounds. 

PCOL 470, 471. Drug Action Conference I, 
II (2,2). One two-hour session per week. 
The two-semester course is an interdisciplin- 
ary seminar designed to integrate the basic 
and clinical pharmacological aspects of the 
major classes of drugs at a level of sophistica- 
tion commensurate with that of the Pharm.D. 
student. The primary objective is to improve 
the student's ability when observing an al- 
tered therapeutic response or when attempt- 
ing to predict an alteration in advance, to 
utilize advanced basic science knowledge in 
thinking about the following determinants of 
drug activity: dosage form and route of ad- 
ministration, dose and dose regimen, absorp- 
tion, distribution, metabolism, excretion, 
receptor-drug interactions, drug-drug interac- 
tions, interactions with other substances, ef- 
fects of disease and miscellaneous patient and 
drug variables. Students learn to evaluate 
original research articles and must present an 
oral and written report in clinical phar- 
macology each semester. 

Pharmacy Practice and 
Administrative Science (PPAS) 

Staff: Lamy (Chairman), Beardsley, Fedder, 
Knapp, Leavitt, McKay, Oed, Palumbo, S. 
Speedie 

PPAS 332. Medical Care Organization (3). 
Spring term, three lectures. Prerequisite: per- 
mission of instructor. A study of the phar- 
maceutical industry and the distribution of 
drug products and pharmaceutical services. 
Special emphasis is placed on the patient and 
on the institutions involved in supplying 
health care to the patient. 



PPAS 333. Pharmacy Practice 1(2). Fall 
term. A basic description of the profession, 
the practice of pharmacy and the health care 
system, including an introduction to the pre- 
scription, weights and measures, official com- 
pendia, drug literature and dosage forms. 

PPAS 352. Community Pharmacy Manage- 
ment III (2). Fall and spring terms. Prerequi- 
site: Pharmacy Management II. A study of the 
management problems of community phar- 
macy, including organization, staffing, direct- 
ing, planning and control. 
PPAS 360. Community Practice 1(2). 
Summer between the first and second profes- 
sional years. A required four-week profes- 
sional experience in beginning community 
pharmacy practice. 

PPAS 361. Institutional Practice I (2). 
Summer between the first and second years. 
A required four-week professional experience 
in beginning institutional pharmacy practice. 
PPAS 363. Special Studies (2). Two credits/ 
four weeks. By permission of the Professional 
Experience Program director. An elective pro- 
fessional experience in a specialized health 
care service or related field. 
PPAS 368. Community Practice II (2-8). 
Two credits/four weeks. A four-week profes- 
sional experience in intermediate/advanced 
pharmacy practice. 




PPAS 369. Institutional Practice II (2-8). 
Two credits/four weeks. A four-week profes- 
sional experience in intermediate/advanced 
community' pharmacy practice. 
PPAS 414. Death Education (3). Fall term. 
The course prepares pharmacy students to 
interact with terminally ill patients through 
increased understanding of the social and 
psychological aspects of death and dying as 
well as approaches to interacting with termi- 
nally ill patients. 

PPAS 4 16. Consumer Education Program for 
Older Adults (2). Offered both semesters, 
variable hours. A training program and a 
program of addressing older adults on intel- 
ligent use of drugs. Credit for fourth and fifth 
year students only. 

PPAS 431, 432. Pharmacy Practice II & III 
(2,2). Fall and spring terms. Prerequisite: 
Pharmacy Practice I . This course deals with 
the theoretical basis and practical application 
in the following areas of pharmacy practice: 
social and behavioral aspects, communication 
skills, health education and professional eth- 
ics; and the application of knowledge of 
prescription and nonprescription medicines, 
parapharmaceuticals and pharmaceutical law. 
PPAS 433, 434. Pharmacy Management I & II 
(2,2). Fall and spring terms. A study of 
management, financial and legal topics as 
they relate to pharmacy practice. 



PPAS 448. Special Projects (var. 1-3). 
Independent investigations in the field of 
pharmacy practice and administrative science 
consisting of library and laboratory or field 
research, seminars and/or other assignments 
appropriate to the problem being investi- 
gated. 

PPAS 449. Special Group Studies (var. 1-5, 
repeatable up to 12 credits). Prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. An omnibus course 
permitting experimentation with new or dif- 
ferent subject matter and/or instructional ap- 
proaches. 

PPAS 454. Institutional Pharmacy 1(2). 
Fundamentals of institutional pharmacy prac- 
tice and administration with emphasis on 
hospitals and nursing homes. Includes phys- 
ical facilities, standards, purchasing, formulary 
implementation, record keeping, drug dis- 
tribution and control systems (Lamy). 
PPAS 456. Computers and Their Applications 
(2). Basic concepts of computing and major 
hardware and software components which 
make up computer systems will be examined. 
An in-depth examination of major pharmacy 
applications will be carried out and criteria 
for evaluation and selection of computers will 
be discussed (Speedie and McKay). 
PPAS 457. Parenteral Therapy (2). A com- 
prehensive review of all aspects of intra- 
venous fluid therapy. Emphasis centers 
around planning, organizing and implement- 
ing an intravenous admixture program; inter- 
nal and external pressures influencing 
development in fluid therapy programs; prep- 
aration of sterile products; and basic concepts 
of fluid balance and disease states, total 
parenteral nutrition and cancer parenteral 
chemotherapy. 



27 



PPAS 458. Selected Topics in Geriatrics and 
Gerontology (var. ). Fall term. The course 
provides an educational experience through 
the investigation of the areas of geriatrics and 
gerontology with the school's Center for the 
Study of Pharmacy and Therapeutics in the 
Elderly. 

PPAS 470. Health Education Seminar (2). 
One two-hour session per week. Health edu- 
cation is the scientific process designed to 
promote the health of individuals and groups 
by the use of education strategies to achieve 
voluntary behavioral change. The objective of 
the seminar is to prepare the student to 
become an effective health educator to pa- 
tients, other health practitioners and/or the 
community. The theoretical and conceptual 
frameworks upon which the discipline is 
based are fully developed. Students learn the 
techniques of behavioral and educational di- 
agnosis and their application in the develop- 
ment of educational intervention. 

Interdepartmental Courses 
(PHMY) 

PHMY 331. Math-Stat for Pharmaceutical Sci- 
ence (2). Fall term. The fundamentals of 
calculus and statistics necessary for an under- 
standing of the quantitative aspects of the 
basic and clinical pharmaceutical sciences, 
with an emphasis on practical applications. 
PHMY 333, 334. Skills Lab I & II (2,2). Fall 
and spring term. Laboratory courses to ac- 
company Pharmaceutical Chemistry I, Bio- 
chemistry, Human Biology, Mathematics and 
Statistics, Pharmacy Practice I, Microbiology, 
Principles of Drug Action and Medical Care 
Organization. Course provides supplemental 
demonstrations and learning activities related 
to the practice of pharmacy' and the afore- 
mentioned courses. 

PHMY 335, 336. Human Biology I & II 
(4,4). Fall and spring terms. A comprehen- 
sive study of structural and functional rela- 
tionships in the human body with special 
emphasis on sites of drug action. In addition, 
the course will explore altered human reg- 
ulatory mechanisms of specific disease states 
as they correlate with therapeutic interven- 
tion. 



PHMY 337. Principles of Drug Action (3). 

Spring term. Prerequisites: Pharmaceutical 
Chemistry I, Biochemistry I and Human Biol- 
ogy 1. A discussion of the general theoretical 
and practical principles of drug action, ab- 
sorption, distribution, metabolism and tox- 
icity. 

PHMY 340. Advanced First Aid (3). A course 
in advanced first aid and emergency care 
including CPR. 

PHMY 431, 432. Pharmacology and 
Therapeutics I & II (4,4). Fall and spring 
terms. Prerequisites: Human Biology I, II; 
Microbiology, Biochemistry; Principles of 
Drug Action; Pharmacy Skills Lab I or permis- 
sion of instructors. The study of drug mecha- 
nism of action, side effects and variables 
affecting administration, presented by phar- 
macologic class. This information is inte- 
grated with therapeutic application and 
monitoring parameters for drug effect and 
toxicity. 

PHMY 433, 434. Skills Lab III and IV (3,3). 
Fall and spring terms. Prerequisites: the skills 
laboratory which accompanies all second pro- 
fessional year required courses. Course pro- 
vides for integration of previously presented 
materials into pharmacy practice situations. 
PHMY 435. Skills Lab V ( 1 ). Fall term. A 
laboratory course to accompany Phar- 
maceutics III, Pharmacy Practice rv and 
Clinical Toxicology. The course provides sup- 
plemental demonstrations and learning ac- 
tivities related to the practice of pharmacy 
and the aforementioned courses. 
PHMY 444. Pharmacy Practice IV (3). Fall 
term. The course teaches the student prob- 
lem solving and patient management skills, 
centered around commonly encountered 
drug-oriented situations. Patient assessment, 
triage, patient education and monitoring skills 
are discussed. 



GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 



29 



Medicinal Chemistry- 
Pharmacognosy (MCPG) 

The Department of Medicinal Chemistry-Phar- 
macognosy offers graduate programs of study 
leading to the degrees Master of Science and 
Doctor of Philosophy. The goal of the depart- 
ment's graduate program is to prepare me- 
dicinal chemists and pharmacognosists for 
academic, industrial or government careers. 
Current research interest is in the areas of 
drug metabolism, biomedical mass spec- 
trometry, biochemical activities of marine 
fungi and genetic and biochemical regulation 
of secondary metabolites formation. Research 
in analytical chemistry as well as basic re- 
search in the area of cancer chemotherapy, 
with an emphasis on radiosensitizing agents, 
are also in progress. The program in the 
natural products areas emphasizes naturally 
occurring and synthetic flavonoids with anti- 
cataract activity and derivatives of anti- 
neoplastic agents with betalamic acid. 

Research Facilities 

The specialized laboratories of the depart- 
ment are equipped with the appropriate 
instrumentation (e.g., mass spectrometer, 
NMR, fermentors) to earn- out the ongoing 
research programs of the department. 

Application 

For information on graduate studies in me- 
dicinal chemistry-pharmacognosy. write to: 

Director of Graduate Studies 

Department of Medicinal Chemistry - 

Pharmacognosy 

University of Maryland 

School of Pharmacy 

20 N. Pine Street 

Baltimore, Mankind 21201 



I : aculty and Research Interests 
Ralph N. Blomster, Professor of Pharmacog- 
nosy and Department Chairman; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Connecticut, 1963. Phytochemistry 
and screening, medicinal folklore evaluation, 
thin-layer chromatography, biotransformation 
and tissue culture. 

Patrick S. Callery, Associate Professor of Me- 
dicinal Chemistry; Ph.D., University of Califor- 
nia, San Francisco, 1974. Metabolism and 
disposition of drugs; biomedical applications 
of mass spectrometry and stable isotopes. 
S. Edward Krikorian, Associate Professor of 
Medicinal Chemistry; Ph.D., Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology, 1967. Near-infrared 
spectroscopy with possible applications to 
pharmaceutical analysis; gas-liquid chro- 
matographic behavior of the salt forms of 
acidic and basic drugs. 
Barton M. Pogell, Professor of Medicinal 
Chemistry-Pharmacognosy; Ph.D., University 
of Wisconsin, 1952. Isolation and mode of 
action of compounds regulating differentia- 
tion in streptomycetes and embryonic 
hepatocytes. 

Karl-Heinz A. Rosier, Associate Professor of 
Pharmacognosy; Ph.D., University of Munich, 
1960. Isolation and structure elucidation of 
flavonoids with anticataract activity; synthesis 
of flavonoid alkaloids; Schiffs bases of tet- 
abouric acid from betaurin with anti- 
neoplastic agents. 

Marilyn K. Speedie, Associate Professor of 
Pharmacognosy; Ph.D., Purdue University, 
1973. Biosynthesis and regulation of forma- 
tion of secondary metabolites, especially anti- 
biotics; biochemical activities of marine fungi. 
Jeremy Wright, Associate Professor of Medici- 
nal Chemistry; Ph.D., University of London, 
1965. Synthesis and preliminary bioevaluation 
of radiosensitizing agents of potential in can- 
cer chemotherapy. 

Nicolas Zenker, Professor of Medicinal Chem- 
istry; Ph.D., University of California, San Fran- 
cisco, 1958. Formation and effects of thyroid 
hormone. 



30 



The following topics represent research ei- 
ther currently in progress or recently com- 
pleted: 
Applications of stable isotopes to the study of 

enzyme reaction mechanisms 
Alternate pathway's for the production of 

gamma aminobutyric acid 
Near-infrared spectrophotometric charac- 
terization of the amide group 
Biotransformation of recalcitrant pesticides 
Isolation, structure identification and syn- 
thesis of flavonoids 
Schiffs bases of betalamic acid 
Effectors of thyroxine 5'-deiodinase 
Enzymology of streptonigrin biosynthesis 
Characterization of new taurine derivatives 
produced by chick embryo hepatocytes 
Cloning of genes regulating development in 

streptomycetes 
MCPG 411. Plant Anatomy (2,2). Fall term. 
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The 
course is designed to teach the student to 
develop a knowledge of the vascular tissue 
and fine structure of vascular plants. It will 
give the student a complete study of the 
gross anatomy and morphology of the appen- 
dages of the living plant and detailed studies 
of the cells, tissues and organ systems of the 
angiosperms and gymnosperms. 
MCPG 413. Plant Anatomy Laboratory (2,2). 
Fall term. Prerequisite: consent of the instruc- 
tor. Laboratory work covers advanced plant 
anatomy with special emphasis placed on the 
structure of roots, stems and leaves of vas- 
cular plants. 

MCPG 421, 422. Taxonomy of the Higher 
Plants (2,2). Fall term. Prerequisite: consent 
of instructor. Designed to emphasize the 
various characteristics, morphological, geo- 
graphical, anatomical and ecological, of plants 
that will allow the student to classify seed 
plants into family, genus and species. The 
course is structured to make use of lecture 
material that outlines botanical characteristics 



necessary to compare the physical properties 
of plants, conduct field work in the collection 
of local plants and allow students to identify 
and classify seed plants and ferns of the local 
flora. The course is taught in an unstructured 
framework in a tutorial mode, which requires 
independent student involvement. 
MCPG 454. Physical Chemistry II (3). Three 
lectures. An introduction to quantitative study 
of rate processes and the physical and chem- 
ical factors which influence the rates of 
chemical reactions, molecular structure and 
physical properties of compounds and ther- 
modynamic properties of solutions. 
MCPG 470. Basic Nuclear Science (3). 
Three lectures per week. Prerequisite: one 
year of college chemistry and one year of 
college physics or consent of instructor. A 
study of the safe and effective use of radi- 
otracers with emphasis on nuclear physics 
instrumentation for in vivo radioassay, count- 
ing statistics, tracer chemistry and radiation 
safety. 

MCPG 471. Basic Nuclear Science Labora- 
tory (1). One three-hour laboratory. Prereq- 
uisite: concurrent registration in MCPG 470 
or consent of instructor. Training in the safe 
and effective use of radiotracers and nuclear 
instrumentation. 

MCPG 620. Instrumental Methods of Phar- 
maceutical Analysis (3). Two lectures, one 
laboratory; spring term. Prerequisites: organic 
chemistry and quantitative analysis. A survey 
of spectrometric and chromatographic meth- 
ods of chemical analysis as applied especially 
to the analysis of materials of pharmaceutical 



interest. Basic principles and applications of 
the various techniques will be stressed so 
that the student will gain an appreciation of 
the scope and utility of the methods dis- 
cussed. 

MCPG 646, 647. Fermentation and Bio- 
synthesis of Natural Products (2,2). 
Prerequisites: microbiology, biochemistry, 
and/or organic chemistry or the equivalent or 
by permission of the instructor. Topics in the 
fermentation area to be discussed and stud- 
ied in the laboratory are the biosynthesis of 
secondary metabolites, batch and continuous 
culture and microbial degradation and trans- 
formations. Biosynthetic topics to be pre- 
sented include the use of isotopes in 
elucidation of biosynthetic pathways, regula- 
tion of secondary metabolism and the ap- 
plication of genetic engineering to applied 
microbiology. 

MCPG 709. Non-Thesis Research (1-3). 
MCPG 739. Seminar ( 1 ). Each semester, 
required of students majoring in medicinal 
chemistry/pharmacognosy. Reports of pro- 
gress and survey of recent developments in 
chemistry. 

MCPG 741. Physical Organic Basis of Medici- 
nal Chemistry (3). Three lectures, fall term. 
Prerequisites: physical chemistry and inter- 
mediate organic chemistry. A discussion of 
atomic structure, bonding, resonance, kinetics 
and mechanism of organic reactions, ster- 
eochemistry and conformation analysis. 
MCPG 758. Special Problems (1-3). 
MCPG 769- Topics in Advanced Medicinal 
Chemistry (2). Two lectures, spring term, 
odd years. Prerequisites: MCPG 443, 444 and 
741. The subject matter may change each 
time the course is presented, depending 
upon current important areas of medicinal 
chemistry. The chemistry of heterocyclic 
drugs is emphasized. 

MCPG 781. Enzyme and Metabolic Inhibitors 
(2). Two lectures, fall term, odd years. Pre- 
requisites: MCPG 431 and 432. Discussion of 
the design, mode of action at the enzymatic 
level and metabolism of biochemical analogs. 
MCPG 799- Thesis Research, Master's Level 
(variable credit). 




MCPG 81 1, 812. Chemotaxonomic and Phy- 
tochemical Methodology (4,4). Two lectures 
and two laboratories; given in alternate years. 
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. A study of 
plant products from the chemotaxonomic and 
microchemical standpoint. Emphasis is be 
placed on the screening of phytochemical 
constituents and their relationship to phy- 
togeny. 

MCPG 841, 842. Natural Products Chemistry 
(4,4). Non-nitrogenous and nitrogenous het- 
erocycles. 

MCPG 899. Dissertation Research, Doctoral 
Level (variable credit). 



32 



Pharmaceutics (PHAR) 

The goal of the pharmaceutics program is to 
provide a broad-based educational back- 
ground emphasizing the theoretical and tech- 
nical disciplines essential for dosage form 
design and evaluation. There is a continuing 
need for such pharmaceutical scientists in the 
research and development laboratories of the 
pharmaceutical industry, in education and 
with government regulatory and research 
agencies. 

Research Facilities 

The schools industrial and pharmaceutical 
technology research and manufacturing facil- 
ity is one of the most modern in the country. 
The facility is equipped with small-scale and 
large-scale equipment for the production of 
liquid, semi-solid, aerosol, parenteral and 
solid dosage forms. Included are stability 
testing facilities and a fully automated drug 
dissolution laboratory. A specially equipped 
solids research laboratory includes instru- 
mented single punch and rotary tablet ma- 
chines, an instrumented automatic capsule 




filling machine and equipment for evaluating 
the physiomechanical properties of powders, 
granules and solid dosage forms. The facili- 
ties also include high intensity mixers, preci- 
sion blenders and fluidized bed granulating 
and coating equipment. Instrumentation is 
available to measure moisture, particle size, 
surface area, conductivity, osmotic pressure, 
surface and interfacial tension and thermal 
effects. Data acquisition, storage and analysis 
are facilitated by a computer which interfaces 
with both machines and instruments and a 
microprocessor-controlled recorder with ana- 
log/digital conversion and disc storage. 

The Clinical Pharmacokinetics Laboratory 
is a modern, state-of-the-art analytical facility 
which supports basic and applied research in 
pharmacokinetics. The laboratory is a focal 
point for research in a clinical phar- 
macokinetics consultation service using 
serum drug concentrations and plays a major 
role in conducting clinical research in hospi- 
talized patients. In addition, the laboratory 
includes the instrumentation and equipment 
necessary to study all phases of a drug's 
absorption and disposition in animals and/or 
humans. 

The laboratory is equipped with fully 
automated high pressure liquid chro- 
matographs, automatic gas-liquid chro- 
matographs, spectrophotometers and 
counting equipment for enzyme and/or radio- 
immunoassay. Minicomputers are available in 
the laboratory; pharmacokinetic analysis of 
data is easily accessible from the laboratory 
through the campus computer system. 



33 



Application 

Applicants should have a degree in pharmacy. 
Majors in chemistry, biology, engineering or 
physics will also he considered, although 
such students may be required to take addi- 
tional undergraduate courses to fulfill re- 
quirements. For further information, write to: 

Director of Graduate Studies 

Department of Pharmaceutics 

University of Mankind 

School of Pharmacy 

20 N. Pine Street 

Baltimore, Mankind 21201 

Faculty and Research Interests 
Ralph F. Shangraw, Professor of Phar- 
maceutics and Department Chairman; Ph.D., 
University of Michigan, 1958. Design, formula- 
tion, manufacture and bioavailability of solid 
dosage forms (tablets and capsules); phar- 
maceutical excipients; drug stability and pack- 
aging ( nitroglycerin ) . 
Larry L Augsburger, Professor of Phar- 
maceutics and Director of the Pharmaceutics 
Graduate Program; Ph.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1967. The interplay of formulation and 
process variables in the design of capsule and 
tablet formulations, drug dissolution and in- 
strumentation of tablet presses and capsule- 
filling machines. 

R. Gary Hollenbeck, Associate Professor of 
Pharmaceutics; Ph.D., Purdue University, 1977. 
Physical pharmacy, including thermodynamics 
of real solutions, drug-excipient interactions 
in solution and water vapor adsorption of 
heterogeneous systems. 
Andre J. Jackson, Assistant Professor of Phar- 
maceutics; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati, 
19" 7 2. Biopharmaceutics and liposomes as 
drug delivery* system. 

Lawrence J. Lesko, Associate Professor of 
Pharmaceutics and Director of the Clinical 
Pharmacokinetics Laboratory; Ph.D., Temple 
University Health Science Center, 1971. Drug 
assay development and clinical pharmaco- 



kinetics with emphasis on cardiovascular 
agents, bronchodilators and drugs in the 
geriatric patient. 

fames Leslie, Associate Professor of Phar- 
maceutics and Assistant Director of the 
Clinical Pharmacokinetics Laboratory; Ph.D., 
Queen's University of Belfast, 1959. Kinetics 
of reactions of biological interest and devel- 
opment of methods of drug analysis. 
The following topics represent research ei- 
ther currently in progress or recently com- 
pleted: 

Development and evaluation of new phar- 
maceutical excipients for direct compres- 
sion of tablets including filler binders, 
lubricants and disintegrating agents 
Effect of formulation and processing variables 
on bioavailability from compressed tab- 
lets and gelatin capsules 
Formulation and stability of nitroglycerin dos- 
age forms 
Instrumentation of tablet presses and capsule 
filling equipment for optimizing man- 
ufacturing and formulation variables 
Drug-excipient complexation in solutions 
Influence of adsorbed moisture on the phys- 
ical and chemical stability of drugs and 
excipients 
Calorimetric measurement of the thermal 
consequences of powder compaction 
Pharmacokinetics of analgesics in sickle cell 

anemia patients during crisis 
Pharmacokinetics of aminoglycosides in dis- 
eased states 



34 



Development of assays and pharmacokinetics 

of cardiovascular drugs 
Pharmacokinetic aspects of the absorption 

and disposition of calcium-channel 

blockers and newer anti-arrhythmic 

agents in dogs and humans 
Factors affecting the serum protein binding 

isotherms of highly bound therapeutic 

agents 
Clinical pharmacokinetics of high-dose phe- 

nytoin in prophylactic management of 

seizures in traumatized patients 

PHAR 602. Advanced Biopharmaceutics (3). 
Three lectures, given in alternate years. Pre- 
requisites: Pharmacology and Therapeutics I 
and II; Pharmaceutics I and II; consent of 
instructor may waive some or all of these. A 
clinically oriented in-depth study of the fac- 
tors affecting the time-course of drugs, with 
emphasis on the implication and qualification 
of these factors in the disease states. 
PHAR 610. Pharmaceutical Formulation and 
Unit Processes (3). Three lectures, fall term, 
given in alternate years. Prerequisites: Phar- 
maceutics I and II; consent of instructor may 
waive one or both of these. A study of the 
processes and equipment involved in the 
large-scale manufacture of pharmaceuticals, 
including a discussion of control procedures, 
new drug applications; patents; and the 
Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 
PHAR 612. Drug Stability and Packaging 
Technology (3). Three lectures, spring term, 
given in alternate years. Prerequisites: Phar- 
maceutics I and II; consent of instructor may 
waive one or both of these. A study of drug 
stability as affected by environment and con- 
tainers. Emphasis is placed on the physical 
and chemical properties of both the drugs 
and the component parts of the container, as 
well as the practical problems of drug pack- 
aging, storage and clinical effectiveness. 



PHAR 701. Theoretical Aspects of Liquid 
Dosage Forms (3). Three lectures, fall term; 
given in alternate years. Prerequisites: Phar- 
maceutics I and an acceptable course in 
physical chemistry; consent of instructor may 
waive one or both of these. The application 
of fundamental physiochemical concepts of 
solution theory, colloids, rheology and sur- 
face chemistry in order to gain an under- 
standing of liquid dosage forms. 
PHAR 702. Theoretical Aspects of Solid Dos- 
age Forms (3). Three lectures, spring term, 
given in alternate years. Prerequisites: Phar- 
maceutics II and an acceptable course in 
physical chemistry; consent of instructor may 
waive one or both of these. A survey of the 
fundamentals relevant to the performance 
and processing of solid dosage forms. As 
most pharmaceuticals are prepared from 
powders, special emphasis is given to means 
of identifying, measuring and controlling 
those properties which determine the pro- 
cessing characteristics of powdered materials. 
PHAR 703- Industrial Pharmacy Laboratory 
(2). Two laboratories, given in alternate 
years. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Lab- 
oratory practice in the preparation of useful 
and important pharmaceuticals in large quan- 
tity, including the observance of federal good 
manufacturing practices. 
PHAR 705, 706. Special Topics in Phar- 
maceutics (2,2). Two laboratories. A study of 
the special problems involved in the design, 
manufacturing and distribution of phar- 
maceutical products including stabilization, 
preservation, optimization of drug availability, 
packaging and drug utilization. 



35 



PHAR 708. Product Development Laboratory 

(2—4). Each semester; laboratories and con- 
ferences as needed. Credits are determined 
after consultation with the instructor. Prereq- 
uisite: consent of instructor. The development 
of new pharmaceutical or cosmetic prepara- 
tions from concept through marketing. 
PHAR 709. Pharmaceutical Seminar ( 1 ). Fall 
and spring terms. Required of students major- 
ing in pharmacy. Course of progress in 
research and surveys of recent developments 
in pharmacy. 

PHAR 747. Advanced Pharmacokinetics (3). 
Two hours of lecture weekly and laboratory 
projects equivalent to one laboratory per 
week; alternate years. Prerequisites: Human 
Biology I, II and Advanced Biopharmaceutics. 
A detailed study of the principles of drug 
transport, distribution, biotransformation, 
binding and excretion. Emphasis is placed on 
quantitative aspects and measurement of 
these processes. 

PHAR 799. Thesis Research, Master's Level 
(variable credit) 

PHAR 801. Physical Pharmacy (3). 
Prerequisite: one year of college-level phys- 
ical chemistry. A study of pharmaceutical 
systems using the fundamentals of physical 
chemistry; in particular, the course aims to 
provide the graduate student with a deeper 
understanding of some fundamental concepts 
of thermodynamics. Basic concepts of chem- 
ical kinetics also will be introduced with 
applications to the decomposition of medici- 
nal agents. 

PHAR 899. Dissertation Research, Doctoral 
Level (variable credit) 

Pharmacology and Toxicology 
(PCOL) 

The Department of Pharmacology and Tox- 
icology offers graduate programs of study 
leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy in pharmacology 
and toxicology. The research emphases of the 
departmental faculty include psychophar- 
macology, neuropharmacology, behavioral 
pharmacology, biochemical pharmacology 
and toxicology. 



The goal of the department's graduate 
program is to prepare scholar-scientists for 
careers in pharmacology and/or toxicology. 
Graduate study committees aid in planning 
and implementing each student's program. 
Annual reviews are conducted to evaluate the 
students progress toward the degree, based 
on faculty assessment of his/her coursework 
and seminar and research performance. Suc- 
cessful completion of written and oral com- 
prehensive examinations is required prior to 
the student s admission to candidacy for the 
Ph.D. degree. The candidate is required suc- 
cessfully to defend a dissertation based on 
independent research. Students are expected 
to pursue graduate studies on a full-time 
basis; completion of the Graduate Schools 
doctoral requirements is usually accom- 
plished within four years. 

Application 

For information on graduate studies in phar- 
macology and toxicology, write to: 

Director of Graduate Studies 

Department of Pharmacology & 
Toxicology 

University of Maryland 

School of Pharmacy 

20 N. Pine Street 

Baltimore, Man-land 21201 



36 



Faculty 1 and Research Interests 
William J. Kinnard, Jr., Dean and Professor of 
Pharmacology; Ph.D., Purdue University, 1957. 
Behavioral pharmacology, cardiovascular 
pharmacology and drug screening tech- 
niques. 

Nairn Khazan, Emerson Professor of Phar- 
macology and Toxicology and Department 
Chairman; Ph.D., Hebrew University, Jerusa- 
lem, I960. Neuropsychopharmacology of 
sleep, evoked potentials and EEG effects of 
halucinogens, observational methods of CNS 
drug evaluation; EEG behavioral and phar- 
macological effects of drugs of abuse, experi- 
mental addiction to opioids in the rat, effects 
of morphine antagonists in suppressing re- 
lapse, pharmacology of agonist-antagonist an- 
algesics and self-administration of opioid 
peptides. 

Gary G Buterbaugh, Associate Professor of 
Pharmacology and Toxicology; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Iowa, 1969. Neurochemistry of seizure 
acquisition and retention, neonatal matura- 
tion of kindled seizures, alteration of limbic 
afterdischarge characteristics, and hormonal 
influences in epileptic phenomena. 
Christine U. Eccles, Assistant Professor of 
Pharmacology and Toxicology; Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins University, 19H0. Neurotoxicology; 
behavioral pharmacology, toxicology of 
pesticides, mercury and lead; and elec- 
trophysiological and neuropharmacological 
techniques in toxicology and pharmacology. 
Esam El-Eakahany, Assistant Professor of 
Pharmacology and Toxicology; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Minnesota, 1980. Biochemical phar- 
macology', cell culture, cyclic nucleotides and 
regulation of CNS neurotransmitter receptors. 
./. Edward Moreton, Associate Professor of 
Pharmacology and Toxicology; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Mississippi, 1971. Neuropharmacology 
and behavioral pharmacology as they relate 
to the study of drug abuse and drug depen- 
dence, EEG and behavioral correlates of ad- 
diction and drug self-administration in the 
rat. 



Myron Weiner, Associate Professor of Phar- 
macology- and Toxicology; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland, 1972. Biochemical pharmacology; 
drug biotransformation; role of cyclic nu- 
cleotides and prostaglandins in drug metabo- 
lism; and mechanisms for altered drug 
metabolism caused by cancer, diabetes or 
aging. 

Gerald A. Young, Adjunct Associate Professor; 
Ph.D., McMaster University, 1973. EEG and 
behavioral correlates of drugs of abuse, be- 
havioral pharmacology of narcotic agonists 
and antagonists and computer analysis of 
drug-induced EEG changes. 
The following topics represent research cur- 
rently in progress or recently completed: 
Alterations in EEG, EMG and behavior pro- 
duced by acute ethanol administration 
Drug self-administration and sleep-awake ac- 
tivity in rats dependent on opioids 
R( >le of cyclic adenine nucleotides in the 

regulation of drug metabolism in normal 
and disease states such as cancer and 
diabetes 
Behavioral and neurophysiological conse- 
quences of prenatal exposure to environ- 
mental toxicants 
Electrophysiologic studies on limbic seizure 
characteristics 

Electrophysiologic characterization of pro- 
convulsant and anti-convulsant drugs 

Effect of aging on conjugative drug metabo- 
lism 

Alterations in heme synthesis, degradation 
and utilization produced by diabetes and 
aging 



Electrophysiological and behavioral effects of 
phencyclidine (PCP) and PCP analogues 
in the rat 
Role of estradiol and progesterone in the 
acquisition, retention and activation of 
seizures 
Electrophysiological effects of alkytin com- 
pounds in rats 
Dynorphin self-administration in the rat 
Mu vs kappa opioid agonists, dependence/ 

withdrawal 
Effects of age and pathology - on coo.xidation 
of drugs by prostaglandin endoperoxide 
synthetase 
Down-regulation of muscarinic cholinergic 

receptors 
Mechanism of tolerance to cardiac effects of 

B-adrenoceptor agonists 
Alteration of hippocampal afterdischarge by 

ketamine and related drugs 
Effects of mu, kappa and sigma opioid ago- 
nists on EEG power spectra and associ- 
ated behavior 
Alterations in EEG, EEG power spectra and 
behavior produced by THC analogues 
PCOL 601, 602. Advanced Toxicology (3,4). 
Prerequisites: Biochemistry, Human Biology I, 
II or equivalent and consent of instructor. A 
two-semester course; either semester may be 
taken separately. PCOL 601: Environmental 
Toxicology (fall semester). PCOL 602: Princi- 
ples of Investigative Toxicology (spring se- 
mester ) . 

PCOL 643, 644. Pharmacodynamics I, II 
(4,4). Prerequisites: Human Biology I, II and 
Biochemistry or equivalent and consent of 
the course director. The course concentrates 
on the mechanisms by which phar- 
macological agents interact with the living 
organism in order to provide the student 
with a rational basis for therapeutic uses, side 
effects, adverse reactions and drug interac- 
tions. The major areas to be covered are the 
pharmacodynamics of drugs influencing the 
peripheral and central nervous systems, car- 
diovascular, renal and the endocrine systems. 




PCOL 707. Principles of Biochemical Phar- 
macology (3). Prerequisites: Pharmacology 
and Therapeutics I, II (PHMY 431, 432), 
Biochemistry (MCPG 431, 432) or equivalent 
and consent of the instructor. Alternate years. 
Two lectures, one laboratory weekly; a the- 
oretical and practical approach to the study of 
the cellular and subcellular actions of drugs 
and the relationship of these actions to the 
pharmacological properties of medicinal 
agents in the intact organism. 
PCOL 720. Techniques and Concepts of 
Pharmacologic Analysis (3). Prerequisite: 
consent of department. The practical and 
theoretical aspects of classical and contempo- 
rary experimental methods used in phar- 
macology. 

PCOL 721. Introduction to Research in Phar- 
macology (3)- Prerequisite: consent of de- 
partment. Systematic rotation of the student 
through the various faculty research laborato- 
ries in the department. 



38 



PCOL 727. Principles of Drug Action (3). 

Prerequisite: consent of department. A discus- 
sion of the general theoretical and practical 
principles of drug action, absorption, dis- 
tribution, metabolism and toxicity. The phar- 
macodynamics of individual drugs or drug 
classes is offered in Advanced Phar- 
macodynamics I. 

PCOL 737. Pharmacometrics and Experimen- 
tal Design (3). A discussion of the theoretical 
and practical application of statistics and ex- 
perimental design to enable the student to 
utilize these tools in research problems. 
PCOL 789. Seminar (1). Prerequisite: con- 
sent of department staff member designated 
as responsible for seminar. Each semester. 
Reports on current literature or research in 
progress. 

PCOL 799. Master's Thesis Research in Phar- 
macology. Properly qualified students may 
arrange with their advisor for credit hours. 
PCOL 829. Advanced Pharmacodynamics 
(3). Prerequisites: Pharmacology and 
Therapeutics I, II or equivalent, alternate 
years. A coordinated series of four one- 
semester courses involving two hours of 
lecture weekly together with conferences and 
special laboratory exercises. 

829A — Neuropsychopharmacology 
829B — Autonomic Pharmacology 
829C — Cardiovascular Pharmacology 
829D — Renal and Endocrine Phar- 
macology 
PCOL 858. Special Studies in Phar- 
macodynamics (2—4). Each semester. Prereq- 
uisites: Pharmacology and Therapeutics I, II 
or equivalent. Credits are determined after 
consultation with the instructor. Laboratories 
and conferences. 

PCOL 899. Doctoral Dissertation Research in 
Pharmacology. Properly qualified students 
may arrange with their advisor for credit and 
hours. 



Pharmacy Practice and 
Administrative Science (PPAS) 

The department offers concentrations in in- 
stitutional pharmacy (M.S., thesis option 
only), community pharmacy management 
(M.S.), and pharmacy administration (M.S. 
and Ph.D.). 

Institutional Pharmacy Concentration 

The objectives of the concentration in institu- 
tional pharmacy are to prepare the student 
to: 

1. Effectively administer a pharmacy program 
in a complex, comprehensive, modern 
institutional pharmacy environment; 

2. Design and perform research that will lead 
to improvement in institutional pharmacy 
practice; 

3. Plan, develop, implement and evaluate in- 
novative pharmacy services that will lead 
to the improvement of health care in the 
institutional setting; 

4. Serve as a knowledgeable spokesperson 
for institutional pharmacy practice to all 
sectors of health care. 

Three options are available. The student may 
pursue: 

1. A full-time academic M.S. program; 

2. A part-time academic M.S. program, 
limited to exceptionally well-qualified 
practitioners who hold responsible posi- 
tions in institutional pharmacy; 

3. A joint M.S. -residency program in conjunc- 
tion with area hospitals. 



39 



Participating hospitals include the University 
of Mankind Medical System/Hospital, the 
Johns Hopkins Hospital, the Veterans Admin- 
istration Medical Center in Washington, D.C. 
(all accredited by ASHP) and the Veterans 
Administration Medical Center in Baltimore, 
Mankind (ASHP accreditation pending). 
Facilities: The program has access to all 
previously described laboratories and utilizes 
course offerings by the schools of medicine, 
nursing and social work and community 
planning. The combined facilities of the par- 
ticipating hospitals offer all aspects of institu- 
tional pharmacy; centralized and decen- 
tralized unit-dose distribution systems, com- 
puter systems, drug information, rv admix- 
ture and TPN sen'ices, patient counseling, 
rounding, audit and DUR. 
Financial Aid: Under the joint M.S. -residency 
program, the student receives a stipend from 
the hospital. Financial support for the M.S. 
program without a residency is not currently 
available. 

Entrance Requirements: Entrance require- 
ments are those of the Graduate School. In 
addition, applicants must have a degree in 
pharmacy and must, within six months of 
admission to the program, show proof of 
registration with the state Board of Pharmacy. 
Applicants to the programs at the Veterans 
Administration Medical Centers must be U.S. 
citizens. Having met these requirements, the 
applicant who elects one of the M.S. -resi- 
dency programs must also apply to the pre- 
ceptor of the residency of his choice. 
Applicants accepted into the joint program 
with the University of Maryland Medical Sys- 
tem/Hospital and the Johns Hopkins Hospital 
must be eligible for licensure in Maryland 
within six months of graduation. Those ac- 
cepted into the program at the Veterans 
Administration Medical Center must show 
proof of licensure at the beginning of the 
program. 



Application: For additional information on 
graduate study in institutional pharmacy and 
an application, write: 

Director, Institutional Pharmacy Program 

Department of Pharmacy Practice and 
Administrative Science 

Liniversity of Maryland 

School of Pharmacy 

20 N. Pine Street 

Baltimore, Mankind 21201 

Community Pharmacy Management 
Concentration 

The concentration in community' pharmacy 
management seeks to prepare the student to: 

1. Effectively manage a modern pharmacy 
practice in a variety of community settings 
including independently owned phar- 
macies, corporate chains, ambulatory 
clinics, nursing homes, health maintenance 
organizations and other organized health 
care settings; 

2. Maintain a proper balance and concern for 
the efficient and economical use of re- 
sources and the need to maintain and 
improve the quality, comprehensiveness 
and accessibility of pharmacy services; 

3. Provide leadership in developing, imple- 
menting and evaluating innovative phar- 
macy services; and 

4. Serve as a knowledgeable spokesperson 
for community pharmacy practice to all 
sectors of health care. 

Applicants must have a professional degree in 
pharmacy'. 

Pharmacy Administration 
Concentration 

The M.S./Ph.D. concentration in pharmacy 
administration seeks to prepare the student 
to: 

1. Design and earn- out high quality research 
related to pharmacy practice and drug use 



40 



based upon strong training in research 
methodology, depth of knowledge in one 
or more of the social and/or administrative 
sciences, a sound understanding of health 
care services and a concern for the appro- 
priate provision of high quality pharmacy 
services; 

2. Serve as a knowledgeable spokesperson to 
the public and private sectors of health 
care concerning pharmacy practice re- 
search and pharmacy-related issues; 

3. Interact with members of other health, 
social and administrative disciplines and 
initiate and/or collaborate in research en- 
deavors related to pharmacy practice and 
other health services; and 

4. Be an effective teacher in both academic 
and nonacademic settings. 

The primary goal of this concentration is to 
educate students to the doctoral level; there- 
fore, an option for especially well qualified 
students to bypass the master's under spec- 
ified conditions, is available. Some of the 
courses required in this program must be 
taken at other University of Maryland cam- 
puses. 

For additional information on graduate 
study in community pharmacy management 
and pharmacy administration and an applica- 
tion, write: 

Director, Graduate Program 

Department of Pharmacy Practice and 
Administrative Science 

University of Maryland 

School of Pharmacy 

20 N. Pine Street 

Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



Faculty 1 and Research Interests 
Peter P. Lamy, Professor of Pharmacy Practice 
and Administrative Science and Department 
Chairman; Ph.D., Philadelphia College of 
Pharmacy and Science, 1965. Geriatrics, drug 
interactions and drug distribution, informa- 
tion systems and nutrition. 
Robert S. Beardsley, Associate Professor; Ph.D., 
University of Minnesota, 1977. Patient coun- 
seling and communication, long-term care, 
death and dying and social aspects of phar- 
macy. 

Donald O. Fedder, Assistant Professor; D.P.H., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1982. High blood 
pressure and health education. 
David A. Knapp, Professor; Ph.D., Purdue 
University, 1965. Medical care organization 
and drug-prescribing review. 
Dean E. Leavitt, Professor; Ph.D., Purdue 
University, 1968. Community pharmacy man- 
agement. 

Alan McKay, Assistant Professor; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity' of Mississippi, 1980. Computers in 
health care; economics of the clinical role 
and community pharmacy management. 
Francis B. Palnmbo, Associate Professor; 
Ph.D., University of Mississippi, 1974; J.D., 
University of Baltimore, 1982. Long-term care, 
community pharmacy management, drug-pre- 
scribing review and pharmacy law. 
Smart M. Speedie, Associate Professor; Ph.D., 
Purdue University, 1973- Health services re- 
search, computer appplications and patient 
and health professional education. 



41 



PPAS 610. Pharmacy, Drugs, and the Health 
Care System (3). An examination of the 
principal components of the U.S. health care 
system with special emphasis on their rela- 
tionship to the provision of drugs and phar- 
macy services ( Knapp ) . 
PPAS 620. Social and Behavioral Aspects of 
Pharmacy Practice (3). The fields of medical 
sociology, psychology, social psychology and 
interpersonal communication will be studied 
as they relate to the pharmacy practice system 
which involves patients, pharmacists, physi- 
cians, nurses and other health care profes- 
sionals (Beardsley) . 

PPAS 630. Advanced Pharmacy Management 
(3). The application of management princi- 
ples to the various practice environments of 
pharmacy (Leavitt, McKay, Palumbo). 
PPAS 632. Special Topics in Community 
Pharmacy (2). A forum for discussion and 
analysis of current issues in community phar- 
macy practice. Relevant topics will be se- 
lected by departmental staff based on current 
developments in community practice (Staff). 
PPAS 640. Advanced Pharmaceutical Market- 
ing (3)- An analytical examination of the U.S. 
pharmaceutical industry and marketing of 
drug products. Topics include the develop- 
ment of new drugs; pricing, promotion and 
distribution; government regulation, competi- 
tion and international issues (Knapp, Leavitt). 
PPAS 650. Health Economics ( 3 ) . An exam- 
ination of the economic factors influencing 
pharmacy and health care and the economic 
implication of activities in the various facets 
of the health care industry (Palumbo). 
PPAS 690. Instructional Techniques for Pro- 
fessional Education (1 ). An introduction to 
the basic principles of teaching in a profes- 
sional education setting. Relevant educational 
principles from the literature of education 
and educational psychology' will be applied to 
the process of teaching (Speedie). 



PPAS 701, 702. Research Methodologies I & 
II (3,2). These courses are designed to 
introduce the student to the concepts of 
scientific research in pharmacy practice and 
administrative science. Topics to be discussed 
include the scientific method and problem- 
solving processes, social science measure- 
ment and several specific methods of re- 
search. 

PPAS 708. Special Problems (var., 1-6). This 
course involves students with faculty mem- 
bers in a number of research or problem 
areas. 

PPAS 709. Graduate Seminar (1 ), repeatable. 
A weekly seminar involving graduate stu- 
dents, departmental faculty and participants 
from outside the department. 
PPAS 799. Master's Thesis Research (var., 
1-6). 

PPAS 899. Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(var., 1-12). 




ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 



43 



University of Maryland 

Board of Regents 

The Honorable Wayne A. Cawley, Jr., Ex officio 

A. James Clark. 1986 

Betty R. Coss. 1988 

Ralph W. Frew 1986 

Frank A. Gunther, Jr.. 1987 

The Honorable Blair Lee III, 1985 

Dorothy J. Lehrman, 1984 

Larry L.' McCullough, 1984 

Clarence M Mitchell, Jr., 1987 

A. Paul Moss, 1988 

Allen L. Schwait, 1984 

Constance C. Stuart, 1985 

The Honorable Joseph D. Tydings, 1984 

John W. T. Webb, 1985 

Central Administration 

John S. Toll, Ph.D., President 

Albert H. Bowker, Ph.D., Acting Executive Vice 

Preside) it 
Rita R. Colwell, Ph.D., Vice President for Academic 

Affairs 
Frank L. Bentz, Jr., Ph.D., Vice President for 

Agricultural Affairs and Legislative Relations 
Donald L. Myers, M.B.A., Acting Vice President for 

General Administration 
Robert G. Smith, M.A., Vice President for University 

Relations 
David S. Sparks, Ph.D., Vice President for Graduate 

Studies and Research 



University of Maryland at 
Baltimore 

Principal Academic Officers 

T. Albert Farmer, Jr., M.D., Chancellor 
Errol L. Reese, D.D.S., Dean, Dental School 
Ross W. I. Kessel, Ph.D., Acting Dean, Graduate 

School 
Michael J. Kelly, Ph.D., LL.B., Dean, School of Imv 
John M. Dennis, M.D., Dean, School of Medicine 

and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 
Nan B. Hechenberger, Ph.D., Dean, School of 

Nursing 
William J. Kinnard.Jr., Ph.D., Dean, School of 

Pharmacy 
Ruth H. Young, Ph.D., Dean, School of Social Work 

and Community Planning 



School of Pharmacy 

Administration 

William J. Kinnard.Jr., Ph.D., Dean 
Dean E. Leavitt, Ph.D., Associate Dean for 

Administration and Professional Services 
Stuart M. Speedie, Ph.D., Assistant and Dean for 

Professio) tal Edi /cation 
Grady Dale, Ed.D., Assistant to the Dean for 

Academic Services 

Professors 

Larry L. Augsburger, R.Ph., Ph.D. (1967), University 

of Maryland, Professor of Pharmaceutics and 

Director of the Pharmaceutics Graduate 

Program 
Ralph N. Blomster, R.Ph., Ph.D. (1968), University 

of Connecticut, Professor of Medicinal 

Chemistry and Pharmacognosy and 

Department Chairman 
Nairn Khazan, R.Ph., Ph.D. ( I960), Hebrew 

University, Jerusalem. Emerson Professor of 

Pharmacology and Toxicology- and 

Department Chairman 
William J. Kinnard.Jr., R.Ph., Ph.D. (1957), Purdue 

University, Dean and Professor of 

Pharmacology and Toxicology- 
David A. Knapp, R.Ph., Ph.D. ( 1965), Purdue 

University, Professor of Pharmacy- Practice and 

Administrative Science 
Peter P. Lamy, R.Ph., Ph.D. (1965), Philadelphia 

College of Pharmacy and Science, Professor of 

Pharmacy Practice and Administrative Science 

and Department Chairman 
Dean E. Leavitt, R.Ph., Ph.D. ( 1968), Purdue 

University, Associate Dean for Administration 

and Professional Services and Professor of 

Pharmacy Practice and Administrative Science 
Burton M. Pogell, Ph.D. (1952), University of 

Wisconsin, Professor of Medicinal Chemistry/ 

Pharmacognosy 
Ralph F. Shangraw, R.Ph., Ph.D. (1958), University 

of Michigan, Professor of Pharmaceutics and 

Department Chairman 
Nicolas Zenker, Ph.D. (1958), University of 

California, Professor of Medicinal Chemistry 

and Pharmacognosy 



44 



Associate Professors 

Robert S. Beardsley, R.Ph., Ph.D. ( 1977), University 

of Minnesota, Associate Professor of Pharmacy 

Practice and Administrative Science 
Gary G. Buterbaugh, Ph.D. (1969), University of 

Iowa, Associate Professor of Pharmacology 

and Toxicology 
Patrick S. Callery, R.Ph., Ph.D., (19 7 4), University 

of California, Associate Professor of Medicinal 

Chemistry and Pharmacognosy 
R. Gary Hollenbeck, R.Ph., Ph.D ( 1977), Purdue 

University, Associate Professor of 

Pharmaceutics 
Robert A. Kerr, R.Ph., Pharm.D. ( 1970), University 

of California, Associate Professor of Clinical 

Pharmacy and Department Chairman 
S. Edward Krikorian, Ph.D. (1967), Massachusetts 

Institute of Technology, Associate Professor of 

Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy 
Lawrence J. Lesko, R.Ph., Ph.D. ( 1971), Temple 

University Health Science Center, Associate 

Professor of Pharmaceutics and Director of 

the Clinical Pharmacokinetics Laboratory 
James Leslie, Ph.D. (1959), Queen's University, 

Belfast, Ireland, Associate Professor of 

Pharmaceutics and Assistant Director of the 

Clinical Pharmacokinetics Laboratory 
J. Edward Moreton, R.Ph., Ph.D. ( 1971), University 

of Mississippi, Associate Professor of 

Pharmacology and Toxicology 
Gary M. Oderda, R.Ph., Pharm.D. (1972), University 

of California, Associate Professor of Clinical 

Pharmacy and Director, Maryland Poison 

Center 
Francis B. Palumbo, R.Ph., Ph.D. ( 1974), University 

of Mississippi. Associate Professor of Pharmacy 

Practice and Administrative Science 
David S. Roffman, R.Ph., Pharm.D. ( 1973), 

University of Maryland, Associate Professor of 

Clinical Pharmacy 
Karl-Heinz A. Rosier, R.Ph., Ph.D. ( 1960), 

University of Munich, Germany, Associate 

Professor of Medicinal Chemistry and 

Pharmacognc >sy 
Marilyn K Speedie^ R.Ph., Ph.D. ( 1973), Purdue 

University, Associate Professor of 

Pharmacognosy 
Stuart M. Speedie, Ph.D. (19 7 3), Purdue University, 

Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice and 

Administrative Science and Assistant Dean for 

Professional Education 
Myron Weiner, R.Ph., Ph.D. ( 1972), University of 

Maryland, Associate Professor of 

Pharmacology and Toxicology 



Thomas H. Wiser, R.Ph., Pharm.D. ( 1973), 

University of Minnesota, Associate Professor of 

Clinical Pharmacy 
Jeremy Wright, R.Ph.,' Ph.D. ( 1965), University of 

London, Associate Professor of Medicinal 

Chemistry 

Assistant Professors 

Grady Dale, Ed.D. (1974), University of Northern 

Colorado, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy and 

Assistant to the Dean for Academic Services 
Christine U. Eccles, Ph.D. (1980), Johns Hopkins 

University, Assistant Professor of 

Pharmacology and Toxicology 
Esam El-Fakahany, R.Ph., Ph.D. ( 1980), University 

of Minnesota, Assistant Professor of 

Pharmacology - and Toxicology 
Donald O. Fedder, R.Ph., D.P.H. (1982), Johns 

Hopkins University, Assistant Professor of 

Pharmacy Practice and Administrative Science 
Alan Forrest, R.Ph., Pharm.D. ( 1979), University of 

Southern California, Assistant Professor of 

Clinical Pharmacy 
Bene Harris-Zuckerman, R.Ph., Pharm.D. (1983), 

University of Maryland, Assistant Professor of 

Clinical Pharmacy 
John M. Hoopes, R.Ph., Pharm.D. (1973), 

Duquesne University, Assistant Professor of 

Clinical Pharmacy 
Andrew J. Hvizdos, RPh., Pharm.D. (1981), 

University of Cincinnati, Assistant Professor of 

Clinical Pharmacy 
Andre J. Jackson, Ph.D. (1972), University of 

Cincinnati, Assistant Professor of 

Pharmaceutics 
Wendy Klein-Schwartz, R.Ph., Pharm.D. (1977), 

University of Maryland, Assistant Professor of 

Clinical Pharmacy and Assistant Director of 

Maryland Poison Center 
Elaine Long, R.Ph., Pharm.D. (1981), Philadelphia 

College of Pharmacy and Science, Assistant 

Professor of Clinical Pharmacy 
Alan McKay, R.Ph., Ph.D. (1980), University of 

Mississippi, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

Practice and Administrative Science 
Robert J. Michocki, R.Ph., Pharm.D. (1974), 

University of Maryland, Assistant Professor of 

Clinical Pharmacy 
Marvin L Oed, R.Ph.,B.S. Pharm. (1956), 

University of Maryland, Assistant Professor of 

Pharmacy Practice and Administrative Science 

and Director of Professional Experience 

Program 



45 



Lecturers 

John F. Fader II, R.Ph., LL.B. ( 1968), University of 

Maryland 
Joseph S. Kaufman, LL.B. ( 1950), University of 

Maryland 

Instructors 

Anthony Tommasello, R.Ph., B.S. Pharm., ( 1973), 
University of Maryland, Instructor in Clinical 
Pharmacy 

Community Preceptors 

Marvin Abrams Mark A. Levi 



Arlin D. Altimus 
Dimitrios Apostolou 
Sarah Atas 
John H. Balch 
John B. Batdorf 
Gerald E. Beachy 
Arnold L. Blaustein 
Jerome Block 
Howard Bragg 
Jack R. Brooks 
Robert H. Campbell 
Leon R. Catlett 
Donald J. Ceccorulli 
Gerald I. Cohen 
John W. Conrad, Jr. 
David Cowden 
James P. Cragg, Jr. 
Ralph J. Crocamo 
James B. Culp, Jr. 
Gerald Y. Dechter 
Joseph LI. Dorsch 
Madeline Feinberg 
Neil Feldman 
Harry Finke 
Louis Friedman 
Howard Gampel 
Harvey J. Goldberg 
Harold Greenhouse 
Douglas B. Haggerty 
Mayer Handelman 
William C. Hill 
J. Todd Holland 
Harold Holmes 
Steven Hospodavis 
M. Neal Jacohs 
Irvin L. Kamanitz 
Albert Katz 
Larry D. Kelley 
Jerold A. Kempler 
Marv T. Lee 



Joseph Libercci 
David Liebman 
Joseph W. Loetell 
Mary Sue Long 
Ronald A. Lubman 
Nicholas C. Lykos 
J. Raymond Macintosh 
Leo F. Mallard 
Philip Marsiglia 
Robert J. Martin, Jr. 
Richard Matheny, II 
Bernard C. McDougall 
Rudolph P. Mierisch 
Jack W. Miller 
Martin B. Mintz 
Renard R. Monti 
John R. Newcomb 
Linda Newman 
Joseph Nusbaum 
John E. Padousis 
Leonard N. Patras 
Howard Pollack 
Sue A. Rephann 
Jerry L. Rhoades 
Arthur N. Riley 
Harold E. Rinde 
Melvin N. Rubin 
Howard R. Schiff 
Donald A. Schumer 
Albert Shapiro 
Howard Sherman 
William Tabak 
Vito Tinelli, Jr. 
Phillip P. Weiner 
Michael L. Weinstein 
Diane White 
Irvin Yospa 
J. Joseph Yousem 
Clifford A. Zarrow 



/; istiti itioi ml Preceptors 

David M. Arrington R. Lee Kestler 

Richard Batz 

Adolph P. Biasini 

Larry Bierley 

Patrick H. Birmingham 

Fred D. Chatlain 



Steven S. Cohen 
Mary W. Connelly 
James F. Day 
Morrell C. Delcher 
Dudley A. Demarest 
Lowell P. Fried 
Joseph F. Galleli 
Harry C. Georgerian 
William R. Grove 
Roger G. Heer 
William J. Heinrich 
A. Ramkrishnan Iyer 
William Jaffe 
John T. Jordan 
Louis R. Kern, Jr. 



Earl LaBatt 
Dorothy Levi 
Daniel F. Mackley 
Richard Ottmar 
Thomas E. Patrick 
Normand Pelissier 
Bonnie Pitt 
Richard Proksch 
Douglas M. Pryor 
James Rising 
Thomas Rodgers 
Sol Rosenstein 
Richard E. Rumrill 
June H. Shaw 
Raymond L. Spassil 
V. Puri Subramaniam 
Ronald C. Telak 
Harry Williams 
Thomas Wilson 



Specialty Institutional Preceptors 



Richard Baylis 
Jerome L. Fine 
Marvin Freedenberg 
Howard S. Gwon 
John Kudrick 



Milton Moskowitz 
Richard D. Parker, 
John R. Ricci 
Allan Schreiber 
Dennis B. Smith 



46 



Statement of Faculty, Student 
and Institutional Rights and 
Responsibilities for Academic 
Integrity 

Preamble 

At the heart of the academic enterprise are 
learning, teaching and scholarship. In universities 
these are exemplified by reasoned discussion 
between student and teacher, a mutual respect for 
the learning and teaching process and intellectual 
honesty in the pursuit of new knowledge. In the 
traditions of the academic enterprise, students and 
teachers have certain rights and responsibilities 
which they bring to the academic community. 
While the following statements do not imply a 
contract between the teacher or the university and 
the student, they are nevertheless conventions 
which the university believes to be central to the 
learning and teaching process. 

Faculty Rights and Responsibilities 

1. faculty shall share with students and 
administration the responsibility for academic 
integrity. 

2. Faculty are accorded freedom in the classroom 
to discuss subject matter reasonably related to 
the course. In turn, they have the responsibility 
to encourage free and honest inquiry and 
expression on the part of students. 

3. Faculty are responsible for the structure and 
content of their courses, but they have the 
responsibility to present courses that are 
consistent with their description in the 
university catalog. In addition, faculty have the 
obligation to make students aware of the 
expectations in the course, the evaluation 
procedures and the grading policy'. 

4. Faculty are obligated to evaluate students fairly 
and equitably in a manner appropriate to the 
course and its objectives. Grades shall be 
assigned without prejudice or bias. 

5. Faculty shall make all reasonable efforts to 
prevent the occurrence of academic dishonesty 
through the appropriate design and 
administration of assignments and 
examinations, through the careful safeguarding 
of course materials and examinations and 
through regular reassessment of evaluation 
procedures. 



6. When instances of academic dishonesty are 
suspected, faculty shall have the right and 
responsibility to see that appropriate action is 
taken in accordance with university regulations. 

Student Rights and Responsibilities 

1. Students shall share with faculty and 
administration the responsibility for academic 
integrity. 

2. Students shall have the right of inquiry and 
expression in their courses without predjudice 
or bias. In addition, students shall have the 
right to know the requirements of their courses 
and to know the manner in which they will be 
evaluated and graded. 

3. Students shall have the obligation to complete 
the requirements of their courses in the time 
and manner prescribed and to submit to 
evaluation of their work. 

4. Students shall have the right to be evaluated 
fairly and equitably in a manner appropriate to 
the course and its objectives. 

5. Students shall not submit as their own work 
any work which has been prepared by others. 
Outside assistance in the preparation of this 
work, such as librarian assistance, tutorial 
assistance, typing assistance, or such assistance 
as may be specified or approved by the 
instructor, is allowed. 

6. Students shall make all reasonable efforts to 
prevent the occurrence of academic dishonesty. 
They shall by their own example encourage 
academic integrity and shall themselves refrain 
from acts of cheating and plagiarism or other 
acts of academic dishonesty. 

7. When instances of academic dishonesty are 
suspected, students shall have the right and 
responsibility to bring this to the attention of 
the faculty or other appropriate authority. 



// isn't i uioi ml Respoi isibilit) > 

1. Campuses or appropriate administrative units of 
the University of Man land shall take 
appropriate measures to foster academic 
integrity in the classroom. 

2. Campuses or appropriate administrative units 
shall take steps to define acts of academic 
dishonesty, to ensure procedures for due 
process for students accused or suspected of 
acts of academic dishonesty, and to impose 
appropriate sanctions on students guilty of acts 
of academic dishonesty. 

3. Campuses or appropriate administrative units 
shall take steps to determine how admission or 
matriculation shall be affected by acts of 
academic dishontesy on another campus or at 
another institution. No student suspended for 
disciplinary reasons at any campus of the 
University of Man land shall be admitted to any 
other University of Mankind campus during the 
period of suspension. 

(Adopted May 8, 1981, by the Board of Regents) 

The I 'niversity of Maryland Position on Acts of 
Violence and Extremism Which Are Racially, 
Ethnically, Religiously or Politically Motivated 
The Board of Regents strongly condemns 
criminal acts of destruction or violence against the 
person or property of others. Individuals 
commiting such acts at any campus or facility- of 
the university will be subject to swift campus 
judicial and personnel action, including possible 
expulsion or termination, as well as possible state 
criminal proceedings. 




The University of Maryland seeks to provide equal 
educational opportunities without regard to race, 
color, religion, national origin, sex, age or 
handicap. This policy extends to employment, 
admission and all programs and activities 
supported by the university. 

The provisions of this publication are not to 
be regarded as an irrevocable contract between 
the student and the University of Maryland. 
Changes in general regulations and in the 
academic requirements are effected from time to 
time. Established procedures for making changes 
protect the institution's integrity and the individual 
student's interest and welfare. When the actions of 
a student are judged by competent authority using 
established procedure to be detrimental to the 
interests of the university community, that person 
may be required to withdraw from the university. 



CAMPUS MAP 

University of Maryland at Baltimore 



ui " " 




University 8c Campus Related Buildings 



1. Administration Building 
737 W. Lombard St. 

2. Allied Health Professions 
Building. 32 S. Greene St. 

3. Baltimore Student Union 
62 1 VV. Lombard St. 

4. (Walter P.) Carter Center 
620 W. Fayette St. 

5. Communis Pediatric Center 
700 W. Lombard St. 

b. Davidge Hall 

522 VV Lombard St. 

7. Dental School 
Havden Harris Hall 
666 VV. Baltimore St. 

8. Dunning Hall 

636 VV. Lombard St. 

9. East Hall. 520 VV. Lombard St. 



10. Grav Laboratory 
520 VV. Lombard St. 



(rear) 



1 1. Greene Street Building 
29 S. Greene St. 

12. Health Sciences Building 
610 VV. Lombard St. 

13. Health Sciences Library 
111 S. Greene St. 

14. Howard Hall 

660 VV. Redwood St. 

15. Institute of Ps\chiatr\ and 
Human Behavior 

645 VV. Redwood St. 

16. Kellv Memorial Building 
650 VV. Lombard St. 

17. Law School, Lane Hall 
500 VV. Baltimore St. 

18. Legal Services Clinic 
116 N. Paca St. 

19. Lombard Building 

5 1 1 VV. Lombard St. 

20. Maryland Institute for 
Emergency Medical Servitcs 
Systems. 22 S. Greene St. 



21. Medical School 

Frank C. Bressler Research 
Building, 655 VV. Baltimore St. 

22. Medical School Teaching 
Facility, 10 S. Pine St. 

23. Medical Technology 
31 S. Greene St. 

24. Mencken House 

1524 Hollins St. (off campus) 

25. Methadone Program 
121 S. Greene St. 

26. National Pituitary Agency 
210 VV. Fayette St. 

(off campus) 

27. Newman Center 
712 VV. Lombard St. 

28. Nilsson House 

826 N. Eutaw St. (off campus) 

29. Nursing School 
655 VV. Lombard St. 

30. Parsons Hall 

622 VV. Lombard St. 

31. Pascault Row 

651-655 VV. Lexington St. 

32. Pharmacy School 
20 N. Pine St. 

33. Poe School, 520 VV. Favette St. 

34. Pratt Street Garage and Athletic 
Facility. 646 VV. Pratt St. 

35. Redwood Hall 

721 VV. Redwood St. 

36. Ronald McDonald House 
635 VV. Lexington St. 

37. Social Work and Administration 
Building. 525 VV. Redwood St. 

38. Social Work and Community 
Planning School 

525 VV. Redwood St. 

39. State Medical Examiner's 
Building, 1 1 1 Penn St. 

40. Storage Building 
710 W. Lombard St. 

41. Temporary Academic Building 
(Tempo South) 

601 VV. Lombard St 

42. Tuerk House 
106 N. Greene St. 

43. University Blood Donor Center 
22 S. Greene St. 

44. University of Maryland Medical 
System/Hospital, 22 S. Greene St. 

45. University Plaza and Garage 
Redwood and Greene Sts. 

46. Westminster Church 
515 VV. Favette St. 

47. Whitchurst Hall 
624 VV. Lombard St.